Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

should i build a 3 gun rifle?????


nightwolf47
 Share

Recommended Posts

i started 3 gun last year and going to be closing up this season with 12. i currently use my LWRC DI that i did a couple mods to such as a comp, and changing the stock to fit me better and added a razor gen 3. the rifle weighs about 8lbs as it sits witch doesn't feel to heavy. i was looking into JP rifle instead of a build, or should i keep what i have. id like to here what ppl use for 3 gun do u build or buy a rifle for 3 gun. if u build where did u start if u bought a rifle what did u get and why.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have purchased two JPs. One 18" and one 14.5". I have since sold the 18" as I can easily get hits out to 600 yards with the 14.5" and it handles much better on bay stages. After making numerous modifications to my setup my recommendation would be to buy an upper if you are going to buy anything. 

 

I would just build a lower and use the controls, trigger, stock, and buffer that you prefer. I changed all these on my JP over time. I think JP has a pretty long wait right now though and if you know what you're doing a home build will be every bit as competitive. 

 

I have two bay match builds that I am messing around with and both have the JP LMOS carrier and the SCS. With an adjustable gas block they feel every bit as smooth and soft shooting as the factory guns. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, RangerTrace said:

I'd just add a nice trigger of your preference and a JP low mass BCG to your current rifle.  It will make a huge difference.  

 

Completely agree. Throw in an SCS if you had an extra $140 and you'll have a completely different rifle. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, RangerTrace said:

I'd just add a nice trigger of your preference and a JP low mass BCG to your current rifle.  It will make a huge difference.  

i forgot to mention i did install a HIPERTOUCH® ECLIPSE trigger as well it help a lot 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are able to keep the dot on target during recoil and rip relatively fast splits paying no attention to recoil during a course of fire I would think you do not need to change anything.  The SCS at that point is more of a luxury thing in not hearing the spring go "Doooing".  JP's SCS does require more maintenance than a normal buffer system, and you have to pay attention to the O-rings on the buffer assembly to prevent issues.  

 

If you find you have to consciously move the dot back on target for follow up shots you may want to play with making the rifle shoot softer.   

 

If you start messing with BCG and buffer mass I believe you will want to install an adjustable gas block if you are not already using one.  The lighter mass will not need as much gas to reciprocate the system, and the gas adjustable gas block will help bleed off gas to lessen the recoil impulse, and help minimize dot movement.  Its the whole system of the lighter BCG and SCS along with the adjustable gas block the leads to the lighter impulse.  If you install the gas block yourself make sure you understand how to line up the gas port on the barrel correctly with the new gas block, or your rifle will never run correctly and/or have tons of issues.  Also make final adjustment on the gas block when the system has at least 500 rounds through it.  You want the system to be somewhat dirty when making the final adjustment.  There are tons of videos on how to tune a gas block on line.

 

If your rifle was reliable and you like it I would keep it with those minor mods.  If you buy a rifle you most likely will not find one with those mods already installed, unless you build a rifle on JP's rifle builder (I think you can choose those options as you build a rifle out, and it will not be cheap).    Otherwise, I cannot remember seeing anyone that offered already built rifles with lighter BCG etc.  I could be wrong, it been awhile since I dug into that info.

 

I had a rifle built for 3 gun and it runs like a top with those components.  If you do not go JP make sure you buy a quality BCG with a coating like Nickle boron, QPQ (which is similar to DLC), or DLC coatings.  Avoid phosphate bolts, in that Nickle Boron, DLC and QPQ can be ran longer without maintenance, and in my opinion run the system way smoother.  

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's easy enough to call it assembling the rifle rather than "building it", it's not like a team of magic gunsmith elves. Invest $200 in specific AR tools and build an inexpensive cheap Palmetto State Kit by following You Tube or buying a book. Most of the assembly procedures haven't changed in fifty years, once you've done a few you can build an excellent gun in less than an hour. So make all your dumb mistakes on a $500 PSA before you spend several thousand on a dream gun. 

 

The skills involved means being able to follow instructions and guides, using internet searches for each question along the way ~ every possible situation has been covered with dozens of videos. After you watch a couple of one topic you'll know as much as 99% of most gun builders. Honestly the hardest part is identifying which spring goes where? (Bolt Catch and Disconnector springs are pretty similar size)

 

You need to punch in pins, squeeze springs, apply Lock-Tite, identity parts from diagrams... use a torque wrench, Torx and hex drivers, pretty straight forward stuff.... but seriously devote a weekend or two and you can call yourself a gun builder

 

What a factory-built gun from a reputable premium manufacturer is going to get you is a gun with everything properly torqued and locked, staked, secured. And a warranty and the knowledge that the parts collection work well together and the gun is balanced, no stupid amateur mistakes. That's worthwhile for a lot of people too busy to devote energy to gun building. 

 

Some gunmakers like JP will keep tighter tolerances so barrels fit into receivers tighter, then they heat the receivers to expand and insert the cold barrel in so it "locks in place". They even did videos so you could do what they do with a simple $12 torch (or your freezer). Others like Sons of Liberty I guess (don't want to draw his wrath) probably are looser than JPs, for less money, but have a great range of reliability, run cheaper ammunition, etc. 

 

JP and other premium brands build really nice guns but if you're at all halfway mechanically inclined you can build a gun just as nice. But probably not your first gun, everyone does at least a few scratches, lost detent pins, doing some part over, etc. 

 

 

Edited by Frankly
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would first take a look at the type of 3 gun matches you shoot or are in your area. If you are going to shoot mostly local bay type matches, you may want a shorter/lighter rifle than one you use for open terrain long range style matches. If you are going to shoot both, you may want one that compliments both style of matches. For bays 14.5" or 16" rifle with red dot vs. 16" or 18" with a LPVO. Whatever you go with spend the money where it counts: trigger, recoil system (adjustable gas, SCS, rifle length gas, etc.) Remember, you don't have to break the bank with high end name brand rifles. The upper and lower are only containers to put the good stuff inside of. Probably 99.9% of all rifle uppers/lowers are just fine right of the shelf. Also, you will be throwing this thing in muddy dump buckets, hitting tables, going prone in dirt, etc. It will will get beat up.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...