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RL 1100 new press setup issues.


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1 hour ago, Sigarmsp226 said:

I see that there is a bearing upgrade kit for the RL1100.

I have the 1050 and the bearing kit is not needed at all. For spillage and bullet tip after MBF station issues the subject is keeping the brass stable as it transitions. A great technique is putting a zip tie around the edge from the powder drop and bullet drop station to the seating die.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Sigarmsp226 said:

Cuz - Not trying to derail your thread but my question is related to setting up the RL1100….

 

 Many years ago I purchased and still use the bearing kit for my XL650 that helped reduce the powder spillage issues. I also cut my detent spring down and replaced the ball with a delrin (spelling) ball. Everything still works great….. So to my question…

 

I see that there is a bearing upgrade kit for the RL1100. I am not experiencing any powder spillage but it is because I am loading “powder puff” loads…Has anyone upgraded their RL1100 with one of these “under the toolhead” bearing kits and if so are you happy with the results….Thanks Mark

 

Here is a link to one that I saw at the BSPS site….

 

https://benstoegerproshop.com/dillon-precision-1050-rl1100-premium-bearing-kit-and-spill-control-solution-by-reloading-innovations/

 

 

The bearing kit is a waste of money. 

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3 hours ago, Johnnymazz said:

Dont waste your money, if the press is set up properly theres no need for all those powder pufff add ons. Service the machine on a regular basis and keep it clean during loading

The trick is trying to determine what’s a “powderpuff add on” vs a useful addition to the press. That’s where experience comes into play. 

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3 hours ago, Johnnymazz said:

Dont waste your money, if the press is set up properly theres no need for all those powder pufff add ons. Service the machine on a regular basis and keep it clean during loading

 

I think this is the key for most issues. High volume loaders in particular.

Also realize these machines are not "set it and forget it" type operations. 

They need constant tweaking. There can be differences even between otherwise identical machines.

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4 hours ago, Johnnymazz said:

Dont waste your money, if the press is set up properly theres no need for all those powder pufff add ons. Service the machine on a regular basis and keep it clean during loading

Oh trust me, I don’t need it. My press is setup correctly, cleaned and serviced on a regular basis. 
 

It’s for this reason I don’t also need the threaded shell plate for the primer station.

 

 

Edited by George16
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On 6/30/2021 at 8:55 PM, Cuz said:

 Thanks Mark,

I didn’t even have to install the Range Panda product to know I won’t use it. I do have a bunch of his stuff and like it a lot, and I was already ordering more stuff so I figured I’d take a chance. 
 

 

Looks like I have to take back my comment on the Range Panda primer catcher.  I got fed up with all the primers ending up on the floor so I installed it, and over the last 500 rounds, it worked perfectly.  I can still see the spent primer drop down the clear tube so I know if it got decapped or not.  Very happy with it so far, as I've been with all the products I've gotten from them.

 

-Cuz

 

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10 hours ago, Cuz said:

The trick is trying to determine what’s a “powderpuff add on” vs a useful addition to the press. That’s where experience comes into play. 

Cuz Ive been reloading for 30 years, running the Ammobot on my Rl1100 for almost 2 years, I service the machine every 10,000 rounds. Ive loaded at least 70,000 rounds on my press. You will be fine with a stock unit.Things get really complex when the machine is automated, its super easy to break s#!t if its not set up right, have fun and enjoy the hobby.

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55 minutes ago, Johnnymazz said:

Cuz Ive been reloading for 30 years, running the Ammobot on my Rl1100 for almost 2 years, I service the machine every 10,000 rounds. Ive loaded at least 70,000 rounds on my press. You will be fine with a stock unit.Things get really complex when the machine is automated, its super easy to break s#!t if its not set up right, have fun and enjoy the hobby.

Johnny:

Does your machine service @ 10,000 rounds include the RL1100's priming system?  Or does it require more frequent cleaning?

 

Thanks!

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8 hours ago, HOGRIDER said:

Johnny:

Does your machine service @ 10,000 rounds include the RL1100's priming system?  Or does it require more frequent cleaning?

 

Thanks!

Yes that includes the priming system, full breakdown and clean of the entire machine

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28 minutes ago, Johnnymazz said:

Yes that includes the priming system, full breakdown and clean of the entire machine

How long does that take?

Is the process to do that documented anywhere?  I was looking at a bunch of Dillon videos just to see how to remove the tool head, and after checking a few where I knew it would be removed, they all started with it already removed. It looks like it’s just that big bolt on top, but how much torque should be used to retighten it?

 

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3 hours ago, Cuz said:

How long does that take?

Is the process to do that documented anywhere?  I was looking at a bunch of Dillon videos just to see how to remove the tool head, and after checking a few where I knew it would be removed, they all started with it already removed. It looks like it’s just that big bolt on top, but how much torque should be used to retighten it?

 

 

As far as I know the Dillon has not documented the complete disassemble/reassemble process for either the 1050 or the 1100. 

However there are numerous Youtube videos for the 1050 and the 1100 is so similar that they can be used for the 1100 as well.

It may seem a bit much the first time you do it but there is really only one way to put it back together so don't worry about that.

Once you've done it a few times it becomes a very straightforward process.

I've used the following: 

 

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4 minutes ago, ddc said:

 

As far as I know the Dillon has not documented the complete disassemble/reassemble process for either the 1050 or the 1100. 

However there are numerous Youtube videos for the 1050 and the 1100 is so similar that they can be used for the 1100 as well.

It may seem a bit much the first time you do it but there is really only one way to put it back together so don't worry about that.

Once you've done it a few times it becomes a very straightforward process.

I've used the following: 

 

ddc:

That's definitely one of the best videos for breaking down the 1050!  

 

👍

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4 hours ago, Johnnymazz said:

Yes that includes the priming system, full breakdown and clean of the entire machine

The reason I asked was that a couple of days ago I decided to clean my primer pickup tubes and primer system magazine, and I noticed the magazine took several alcohol patches to clean all the primer residue out.  I only use Federal Match primers, and have loaded less than 5,000 rounds..........

 

All reloaded brass is processed off-machine. 

 

Right now I'm wondering if I need to remove the Primer Slide Indexing Assembly and the Primer Slide in order to clean the Slide track of any residue/debris?  Also wondering if the slide track can be successfully cleaned without removing the shell plate?

 

Thanks! 

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Ive never cleaned primer tubes or magazines but the slide and underneath it needs to be clean so it travels smoothly. Also watch out for build up on the priming punch. 

 

As soon as my primers start playing up I tear it down and clean it.

 

Recently i had some trouble doing a run of 300 rounds, maybe 10 or so bad primers so I stopped and gave it a good clean. Then the next day I loaded 9200 rounds with zero primer issues. The press was spotless at the end. The brass was already processed beforehand. 

 

Before the 300 round run where I had trouble I had deprimed and sized about 25,000 40 cal cases. The primers leave a crusty residue all over the swage and priming area once they are deprimed. I had a small dome of crud on top of the primer punch causing my issues. 

 

 

 

 

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I don't think you can remove the primer slide without raising the primer slide actuating mechanism.

I may be mistaken on that. When I remove the slide I'm also removing everything else most times so no big deal.

 

I'm constantly using compressed air to blow debris off of the area around the primer slide and associated mechanism.

I've been told that doing so can lessen the probability of a primer stack explosion.

Having experienced an entire stack going off I'm quite interested in anything that could help prevent it.

 

As a result of all that I probably disassemble the primer mechanism more often than most.

Probably about every 5K.

 

In fact when I do that I've started taking the rest of the whole top end apart and clean and lube.

It really goes quite quickly once you've done it a few times.

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2 hours ago, ddc said:

 

As far as I know the Dillon has not documented the complete disassemble/reassemble process for either the 1050 or the 1100. 

However there are numerous Youtube videos for the 1050 and the 1100 is so similar that they can be used for the 1100 as well.

It may seem a bit much the first time you do it but there is really only one way to put it back together so don't worry about that.

Once you've done it a few times it becomes a very straightforward process.

I've used the following: 

 

Nice video, thanks for pointing it out. 

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1 hour ago, ddc said:

I don't think you can remove the primer slide without raising the primer slide actuating mechanism.

I may be mistaken on that. When I remove the slide I'm also removing everything else most times so no big deal.

 

I'm constantly using compressed air to blow debris off of the area around the primer slide and associated mechanism.

I've been told that doing so can lessen the probability of a primer stack explosion.

Having experienced an entire stack going off I'm quite interested in anything that could help prevent it.

 

As a result of all that I probably disassemble the primer mechanism more often than most.

Probably about every 5K.

 

In fact when I do that I've started taking the rest of the whole top end apart and clean and lube.

It really goes quite quickly once you've done it a few times.

Since I don't have the ratchet assembly on my machine, I'm "thinking" I may be able to remove the clevis pin from the Lever Arm Bracket, remove the Slide Stop in back, and then remove the Primer Slide Assembly which "should" give me a pretty good view of the Primer Slide channel for thorough cleaning.  But there could be an area under the shell plate that may not be accessible............

 

Even though I've never had an entire stack to light off, I always want to do anything and everything I can to prevent it!  

 

THANKS for sharing the process for using compress air.  I keep a couple of cans on the bench anyway.

 

And thanks for sharing your experience!

 

:)

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That might work; I've never tried it though.

 

My vote would be to bite the bullet and pull the tool head off completely, completely remove the primer mechanism, unscrew the shell plate lock ring, remove the shell plate.

 

That will also give you access to the primer punch mechanism, which is easy to remove, clean, reinstall.

 

That also would allow you access to the index detent ball and spring. I've found that keeping that clean helps keep the indexing process working correctly. If that detent ball and spring get too much gunk on them, eventually will happen, then the index doesn't complete the way it should.

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10 minutes ago, ddc said:

That might work; I've never tried it though.

 

My vote would be to bite the bullet and pull the tool head off completely, completely remove the primer mechanism, unscrew the shell plate lock ring, remove the shell plate.

 

That will also give you access to the primer punch mechanism, which is easy to remove, clean, reinstall.

 

That also would allow you access to the index detent ball and spring. I've found that keeping that clean helps keep the indexing process working correctly. If that detent ball and spring get too much gunk on them, eventually will happen, then the index doesn't complete the way it should.

ddc:

Again, thanks for the detailed explanation!

 

It's one of those situations where I dread doing it; but after I have, I'm competent and comfortable with doing it again!

 

👍

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Every time I remove the primer slide assembly for cleaning, I don’t touch, move or remove it by loosening the nut. Instead, I use an Allen wrench and loosen the set screw instead. Doing it this way keeps the adjustment the same when it’s time to put it back on.


I also inscribed a mark on the shell plates and it corresponds to the detention ball spring so it also goes back the same relative position. So far it has been working very well for me. 
 

I clean the whole machine after processing either 9mm or .223 brass (roughly every 5k cases).

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Arghh!!!
I just loaded 125 rounds in under 4 minutes on my new press. 
 

Then, I realized that I forgot to put primers in the primer tube!  Ughh!

 

Talk about a damn rookie mistake...

 

I think this post belongs in the “beginners” forum…

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9 minutes ago, Cuz said:

Arghh!!!
I just loaded 125 rounds in under 4 minutes on my new press. 
 

Then, I realized that I forgot to put primers in the primer tube!  Ughh!

 

Talk about a damn rookie mistake...

 

I think this post belongs in the “beginners” forum…

Cuz:

Don't sweat it...........WE ALL MAKE MISTAKES!  And I bet you won't let that happen again!  :)

 

BTW:  Low primer alarm not working?  😉

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6 minutes ago, HOGRIDER said:

Cuz:

Don't sweat it...........WE ALL MAKE MISTAKES!  And I bet you won't let that happen again!  :)

 

BTW:  Low primer alarm not working?  😉

I deserved that. 
I pulled the rod out when it went off, and got distracted, I forgot to put in the primers and the rod. 
 

And your right, won’t do that again. 

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