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929 Cylinder Size


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Posted (edited)

I was looking for previous thread to hijack, but couldn’t find one.

 

I got a .357 and .358 pin gauge. The .357 passed right through, the .358 does not. Reason asking I cannot push a .358 160 RN through the cylinder by hand. I have a bunch of Bayou .358 160 RN that I was going to use. But now I’m curious if it would lead up.
Any thoughts?

 

BTW this got me thinking from @Fishbreath ‘s post and his Ruger leading up.

Edited by SSGGlock
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You might be lucky enough to have cylinders that are actually at .3575”. If you’re not having any accuracy problems, don’t worry about it. The bullet shouldn’t just push through, it should take a couple of light taps with a hammer and a dowel pin. 

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3 minutes ago, Kurusty said:

You might be lucky enough to have cylinders that are actually at .3575”. If you’re not having any accuracy problems, don’t worry about it. The bullet shouldn’t just push through, it should take a couple of light taps with a hammer and a dowel pin. 

I actually think the cylinders are .3575. I haven’t tried tapping any through, if they tap through, I assume the coating should remain?

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if it cuts, the finish will be removed. Check 4drentals.com , they rent reamers, I’ve used them a couple of times for odd calibers. Your best bet is to have a gunsmith do it, it will probably cost you the same as the rental. 

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Total cost of my reamer rental was about $60, for what it's worth, between inbound and outbound shipping and the cost of the tool. Brownell's sells the same reamer and pilot kit for $180.

 

If/when I buy a backup gun, I'll probably also buy a set of reamers. I think a progressive press is on my list for before that, though.

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Posted (edited)
On 5/13/2021 at 8:05 PM, SSGGlock said:

I was looking for previous thread to hijack, but couldn’t find one.

 

I got a .357 and .358 pin gauge. The .357 passed right through, the .358 does not. Reason asking I cannot push a .358 160 RN through the cylinder by hand. I have a bunch of Bayou .358 160 RN that I was going to use. But now I’m curious if it would lead up.
Any thoughts?

 

BTW this got me thinking from @Fishbreath ‘s post and his Ruger leading up.

Those dimensions sound correct to me. The bullet should be bigger than the throat, and the throat should be bigger than the barrel. Leave it alone.

Edited by PatJones
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I use .358 bullets to prevent leading and to get good accuracy. If it were me I would load load up some of the bullets you have

and try them . Before carving on the gun to fix a nonexistent problem.  Just a FYI I have purchased two 929 that had leading and 

accuracy issues. Both were fixed by cleaning and .358 bullets. A third one came up a few weeks ago .This time it was a friend so

we cleaned and shot it with my ammo. He is very happy now.

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Lead bullets should be sized to your throat, or the throat should be sized to the bullets. You should be able to push your bullet through the throat with thumb pressure, throats should be the same size as the throat or, ideally .0005" smaller. Lead bullets that fall through the throat will cause leading because hot gases will go by the bullets as it leaves the throat and vaporize lead which will build up in the forcing cone and first inch of the barrel. Polymer coated bullets seem to withstand this and not cause leading. Tight bullets will be resized by the throats and, over time, the force of that resizing wil increase the end shake of the cylinder. With light loads that might take a while, but why not size the throat to the bullet, it isn't expensive and can be done at home.

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11 hours ago, CtYankee said:

Tight bullets will be resized by the throats and, over time, the force of that resizing wil increase the end shake of the cylinder. With light loads that might take a while, but why not size the throat to the bullet, it isn't expensive and can be done at home.

Because we're talking about a titanium cylinder and that would cut through the surface coating. If it ain't broke....

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Posted (edited)

My 929 shoots the 160 Bayou (or SNS) 0.358 just fine with no leading and as good of a group as I can shoot with a pistol. For 9mm (tapered) brass I am going to switch to a lighter bullet though as I see the rare bullet that has walked forward now and then and I have it in my head that this might be reduced shooting something closer to 130 grain than 160. In my gun 0.356 coated leads up nasty and I start throwing knuckle balls after about 100 rounds.

 

Edited by IHAVEGAS
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On 5/16/2021 at 12:07 AM, PatJones said:

Because we're talking about a titanium cylinder and that would cut through the surface coating. If it ain't broke....

Alright, I don't know anything about Titanium cylinders. Alternatively, you can resize the bullets. Polymer coated bullets can be sized down .001" without removing the polymer (yes, I've done this). Lee sizing dies are inexpensive and Midway carries them in .357.

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10 minutes ago, tomjerry1 said:

Are all of you guys using anything other than 9mm brass? 38 short colt? I'm thinking about using a larger bullet, .356 plated, to maybe a .357/.358.

 

My barrel slugged at .357 so I use .357/.358 bullets.

 

I shot one cylinder of .38 Short Colt thru it, but then couldn't resize the brass enough to use in my 627, so I just use 9mm brass now.

 

Federal brass with TK moon clips, Winchester brass with Ranch Products moon clips.

 

ymmv

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2 minutes ago, tomjerry1 said:

Guess I need to slug the barrel, it's shooting 9mm fairly well tho. I'd sure like to stop the bullets from walking out of the cases during firing.

 

I switched to a U die, and crimp the s#!t out of them 

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I had problems with plated bullets pulling out of the cases on my 627. Plated bullets are sometimes undersized, so I stopped using them and I roll crimp everything now.

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5 hours ago, tomjerry1 said:

PatJones, are you use straight lead? 

I did for years, now I'm using coated lead. My lead numbers dropped after I made the switch. I'm a gunsmith at an indoor range, my lead numbers are generally elevated above the average shooter.

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7 hours ago, PatJones said:

I did for years, now I'm using coated lead. My lead numbers dropped after I made the switch. I'm a gunsmith at an indoor range, my lead numbers are generally elevated above the average shooter.

 

I always wondered what the employees lead level was like, being there 5 days a week they must suck in a lot of it.

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14 hours ago, ysrracer said:

 

I always wondered what the employees lead level was like, being there 5 days a week they must suck in a lot of it.

It's not just breathing, it's the residue on surfaces that get on your hands and then rub your eyes or eat or smoke or...

I never thought the amount of lead in primers was a big deal, until I shot Fiocchi Lead/Zinc Free in new cases?  The fired cases were completely clean!

 

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