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Hard Leans


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Shot a match last Sunday that involved two positions on the same stage where a fairly heavy and awkward lean was required for some targets.  I don't really have a problem shooting once I'm in the lean but I have a lot of hesitation getting into that position.

 

What are some things I could practice, beyond just setting up heavy leans, that may help this process?  Would you say there are general physical skills that could help this process?  I'm currently working on keeping low throughout my shooting to allow better flow around a stage.

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3 hours ago, joshdub84 said:

Shot a match last Sunday that involved two positions on the same stage where a fairly heavy and awkward lean was required for some targets.  I don't really have a problem shooting once I'm in the lean but I have a lot of hesitation getting into that position.

 

What are some things I could practice, beyond just setting up heavy leans, that may help this process?  Would you say there are general physical skills that could help this process?  I'm currently working on keeping low throughout my shooting to allow better flow around a stage.

Based on your info above: Practice hard leans to the right and left, getting in and out whilst staying low in a dry fire setting. Use all the space at your disposition within the shooting area, place tip of the strong foot on the fault line, weak foot pointed in the direction you want to go. Except of the physical aspects, it's also mental: always adopt a can do mentallity! DVC

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Practicing hard leans in dryfire and livefire will help a lot. In dryfire, play with different methods of setting up your feet and how you load your weight.

 

Physical fitness helps a lot, especially core and lower body strength. 

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On 4/28/2021 at 11:32 AM, joshdub84 said:

Shot a match last Sunday that involved two positions on the same stage where a fairly heavy and awkward lean was required for some targets.  I don't really have a problem shooting once I'm in the lean but I have a lot of hesitation getting into that position.

 

What are some things I could practice, beyond just setting up heavy leans, that may help this process?  Would you say there are general physical skills that could help this process?  I'm currently working on keeping low throughout my shooting to allow better flow around a stage.

If you are on the right side of the port/barricade and shooting around it to the left, land with your right foot forward and your hips to the left. Drive your right knee out over your toes of the right foot. This allows you to still stay low, always know which foot should lead, come around the edge without bending/rolling over at the waist as much, have a foot already loaded when it is time to move again.

 

Right side of something, right foot forward. Left side of something, left foot forward. Drive same knee over toes of forward foot. Twist more than bend. Know how you want your feet and making it a repeatable thing will help to reduce your hesitation. Secondly have some sort of visual reference point to know you've landed in what you feel is your best spot. Whether it is a quick glance at something on the fault line or something at eye level on the port barricade.

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The basic lean requires you to counter your weight that is on the side of your center of gravity with your leg, which is the only extremity that you can "spare" to provide counterbalance. So, if you want to have both legs on the ground, you have to go low - an outstretched leg at a severe angle won't touch the ground unless your primary leg is very low. Alternatively, if you're finishing the stage or continuing in the direction of the lean, you can keep the leg outstretched and in the air - less balance, but faster. This is often used for finishing a stage with a hard lean. 

 

Whatever you do with your body to keep the center of gravity somewhere between your legs is secondary fine tuning. You can't get around the leg position physics. 

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I would also add to practice leans into a drop step to get out of those positions faster.  Ideally you won't have to program a hard lean into your stage program, but when you absolutely have to, hitting a drop step will make it that much easier to get going to the next position.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Some strengthening of the outside of the hips will help as well. Look up clam shells on Google. Typically start with a couple sets of 10 reps on each side with a 10 second hold on each rep, focusing on good hip mobility without twisting your trunk.

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