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Why am I so "creative"?


D_B_X
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I am new to competition (and shooting in general). I now had 12 matches, and screwed up in each and every one of them. The mistakes include newbie ones like "never saw a target and never planned for it", "forget my stage planning and missed 2 last targets", "take my eyes off target too quickly and have Mikes on the closest targets", yada yada... They frustrated me a great deal. But I am determined not to repeat the same mistake twice --- so far I have done that.

 

The most frustrating part is I keep finding new ways to screw things up. In my last match at a big stage, I had planned things carefully. But the moment the buzzer went off, my right-hand drew the pistol (of course). And in the most inexplicable fashion, my left hand grabbed a loaded mag from my waist and went into a reload motion. As my two hands started to meet to shoot the first target, I was confused: "WTF do I have a mag in my left hand?!!!" In a panic reaction, I dropped the mag and proceeded to shoot the stage. Of course, at the end of the stage when I went for my 2nd reload, my left hand found nothing on my waist. With great embarrassment and everyone watching, I ran back the stage to pick up my dropped mag at the start position -- a good 25+ yards away.

 

Never ever in any dry-fire practices or matches did I ever go for a reload at the draw. I could not understand what made me do that.

 

I am utterly frustrated by my creativity to come up with new ways to screw things up in every match. 

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2 hours ago, D_B_X said:

I am new to competition (and shooting in general). I now had 12 matches, and screwed up in each and every one of them. The mistakes include newbie ones like "never saw a target and never planned for it", "forget my stage planning and missed 2 last targets", "take my eyes off target too quickly and have Mikes on the closest targets", yada yada... They frustrated me a great deal. But I am determined not to repeat the same mistake twice --- so far I have done that.

 

The most frustrating part is I keep finding new ways to screw things up. In my last match at a big stage, I had planned things carefully. But the moment the buzzer went off, my right-hand drew the pistol (of course). And in the most inexplicable fashion, my left hand grabbed a loaded mag from my waist and went into a reload motion. As my two hands started to meet to shoot the first target, I was confused: "WTF do I have a mag in my left hand?!!!" In a panic reaction, I dropped the mag and proceeded to shoot the stage. Of course, at the end of the stage when I went for my 2nd reload, my left hand found nothing on my waist. With great embarrassment and everyone watching, I ran back the stage to pick up my dropped mag at the start position -- a good 25+ yards away.

 

Never ever in any dry-fire practices or matches did I ever go for a reload at the draw. I could not understand what made me do that.

 

I am utterly frustrated by my creativity to come up with new ways to screw things up in every match. 

There’s a lesson here. Never ever shoot a stage without having extra “oh s#!t” mags on your belt. 

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5 hours ago, D_B_X said:

In a panic reaction

I'm guessing that by being new to this you have some high tension before the buzzer goes off. Relax, because being calm is the main factor of performing well in these sports. It's great that you plan to do what you want to do, but you have to release most of your mental tension to prevent error. Remember that throughout the day(s) it's a game.

 

Try reading these articles from @benos. They might help.

https://brianenos.com/care-less/

https://brianenos.com/no-need-to-worry/

https://brianenos.com/stay-calm/

 

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We usually put the newer shooters down the list and this doesn't help if you are first couple up, but I have learned that taping & resetting the stage as many times as possible gives me a heads up on my stage plan because you see all the hidden targets & positions. 

 

gerritm

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3 hours ago, Sarge said:

There’s a lesson here. Never ever shoot a stage without having extra “oh s#!t” mags on your belt. 

That is one lesson I took from this. The number of lessons keep adding up -- that's what deflated me.

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29 minutes ago, TheChewycookie said:

I'm guessing that by being new to this you have some high tension before the buzzer goes off. Relax, because being calm is the main factor of performing well in these sports. It's great that you plan to do what you want to do, but you have to release most of your mental tension to prevent error. Remember that throughout the day(s) it's a game.

 

Try reading these articles from @benos. They might help.

https://brianenos.com/care-less/

https://brianenos.com/no-need-to-worry/

https://brianenos.com/stay-calm/

 

Thanks. You are absolutely right. In fact I had realized this from my earlier screw-up. And I try to remind myself to relax. Then I forget this from time to time.

 

What really frustrated me this time was why on earth did I go for reload at the buzzer. Where did that come from....

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1 minute ago, D_B_X said:

Thanks. You are absolutely right. In fact I had realized this from my earlier screw-up. And I try to remind myself to relax. Then I forget this from time to time.

 

What really frustrated me this time was why on earth did I go for reload at the buzzer. Where did that come from....

 

Was one of your last practice sessions all reload practice?  Quite possible that muscle memory was stuck in your brain.

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40 minutes ago, gerritm said:

We usually put the newer shooters down the list and this doesn't help if you are first couple up, but I have learned that taping & resetting the stage as many times as possible gives me a heads up on my stage plan because you see all the hidden targets & positions. 

 

gerritm

I do end up being the first shooters because of alphabetical order. Except my very first match, I am always the 1st or 2nd shooter at some stage. A few times when the stage was big, I knew I was not ready but time was up. Like the reload-at-buzzer screw-up last match, I was the 2nd shooter. But that's part of the game and not an excuse for my screw-up...

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Just now, D_B_X said:

I do end up being the first shooters because of alphabetical order. Except my very first match, I am always the 1st or 2nd shooter at some stage. A few times when the stage was big, I knew I was not ready but time was up. Like the reload-at-buzzer screw-up last match, I was the 2nd shooter. But that's part of the game and not an excuse for my screw-up...

 

Ask for a different sort order.  When the scoring tablets follow the squad, a random sort stays the same stage to stage and is "equitable" vs name or number.

 

Almost nobody argues with this.

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3 minutes ago, mreed911 said:

 

Ask for a different sort order.  When the scoring tablets follow the squad, a random sort stays the same stage to stage and is "equitable" vs name or number.

 

Almost nobody argues with this.

Thanks. I may do that. Regardless, getting myself ready more quickly is also something I should work on. 

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4 minutes ago, D_B_X said:

Thanks. I may do that. Regardless, getting myself ready more quickly is also something I should work on. 

 

FWIW, I'm about to have a fun night at a match.  Doing something silly because I can... and I've never practiced with it so it should be interesting to say the least...

 

Dan Wesson 8" .357 (shooting .38 spl) for Steel Challenge.  From a holster.  :)

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27 minutes ago, D_B_X said:

I do end up being the first shooters because of alphabetical order. Except my very first match, I am always the 1st or 2nd shooter at some stage. A few times when the stage was big, I knew I was not ready but time was up. Like the reload-at-buzzer screw-up last match, I was the 2nd shooter. But that's part of the game and not an excuse for my screw-up...

I wouldn't hesitate to ask to be moved somewhere further down in the shooting order.   Most decent RO's, knowing who is a newbie, will do this automatically.   It's just too much for a new shooter to absorb IMHO.  Plus I believe it's safer.   New shooters get a chance to be more acclimated to the squad and get to see how others run the stage.   Less stress, less chance of screwing up IMHO. 

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13 minutes ago, NETim said:

I wouldn't hesitate to ask to be moved somewhere further down in the shooting order.   Most decent RO's, knowing who is a newbie, will do this automatically.   It's just too much for a new shooter to absorb IMHO.  Plus I believe it's safer.   New shooters get a chance to be more acclimated to the squad and get to see how others run the stage.   Less stress, less chance of screwing up IMHO. 

This.

 

I don't know where you shoot, but here in the Houston area we never go off the way you either signed up, were squadded, or alphabetical. We always do a random mix and ask if newer shooters are comfortable  going early or need to move down. If you do go first you will rotate on next stage to last. This is supposed to be fun and a game. Major matches you are kinda stuck. Between watching other experienced shooters run the stage & taping & resetting you will get a good plan figured out. Tough part is sticking to it when the "neuralizer" goes off.

 

gerritm

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  • 4 weeks later...

What may seem to be a big screw up really isn't. Nobody is born into being a GM level shooter. It take years and years or screw up to get there. Learn from the mistake but dont let it ruin your day. Only think about the stage you are on. Dont dwell on past stages or future stages of the match. Doing that has helped me a lot. 

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I had to start the first stage in my first ever match and it was the important IPSC long course. I was so scared and stressed, my heart was pumping like hell. All i tried to do was calling my shots.

After the stage i felt like i could collapse :) and i really thought about driving back home. I couldn´t handle the pressure. 

 

Somehow I made 2nd on that stage with 3 seconds slower than some of the top 5 but with much more points. Made 2nd overall in Production out of 31 and could´t believe it. I was very happy.

 

The next 5 matches i made many of the mistakes you talked about. Forgot targets, run targets over, forgot stage plans, shot silly mikes i called good, lost magazines and I even was laying on the ground, slipping out on a piece of brass (indoors).  :)

 

It´s such a cool sport, but it´s very hard to handle the pressure :( 

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