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Weighted 1911 base pads for single stack


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no idea about the rules, but I have several brass mag pads for SS I used in Standard in HI 10 round land. You check brownell's ?
Although dont really see much need for them if your gun is set up correctly and you have good reload technique.

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The dawson pads would be the heaviest ones most likely. Not many companies do anything with 1911 mags. But honestly the best way to add weight where it should be is a tungsten guide rod. 

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On 4/11/2021 at 5:55 PM, Bakerjd said:

The dawson pads would be the heaviest ones most likely. Not many companies do anything with 1911 mags. But honestly the best way to add weight where it should be is a tungsten guide rod. 

I’m with you on the tungsten guide rod. I would just like to see someone make brass pads for single stack. Reality is sometimes s#!t happens and you empty mags don’t want to drop free. One buggy reload can really set you back on a stage...

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Cesar Shop out of Europe sells base pads in brass but the are currently out of stock.

 

Edit: They are in stock. Waiting for them to respond to my email so I can order them.

Edited by ramnj
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/13/2021 at 6:07 PM, shootin-blanks said:

I've seen several tungsten guide rods break, I would pass on those.

Which ones? I've ran them for years now with out issue. On SS and limited guns. Only ones I use are 1 piece EGW tungsten guide rods. 

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Gravity is the same regardless of the weight of the mag. Sort of like Newton's laws. :-)

 

SV Tungsten guides have lasted for years for me.  

Two STI Tungsten guides broke rather quickly-like within the first few months.

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11 hours ago, pjb45 said:

Gravity is the same regardless of the weight of the mag. Sort of like Newton's laws. 🙂

 

SV Tungsten guides have lasted for years for me.  

Two STI Tungsten guides broke rather quickly-like within the first few months.

Gravity is the same, but any friction inside the grip is another story. And there can be friction from not getting a proper mag catch press, the gun not being perpendicular to the ground, or just dirt/dust/grit that may get inside the gun. 

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On 4/27/2021 at 10:19 AM, pjb45 said:

Gravity is the same regardless of the weight of the mag. Sort of like Newton's laws. 🙂

 

SV Tungsten guides have lasted for years for me.  

Two STI Tungsten guides broke rather quickly-like within the first few months.

Gravity is always the same but then you have to take account for outside forces. So really gravity has nothing to do with the mag leaving the gun easier, faster. Just look at the old idea of a feather and something solid of the same weight. Gravity pulls each down with the same force but the feather takes longer. I'm sure their is some mathematical theory that explains this but I'm not an engineer. 

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2 hours ago, Bakerjd said:

Gravity is always the same but then you have to take account for outside forces. So really gravity has nothing to do with the mag leaving the gun easier, faster. Just look at the old idea of a feather and something solid of the same weight. Gravity pulls each down with the same force but the feather takes longer. I'm sure their is some mathematical theory that explains this but I'm not an engineer. 

It's actually resistance that makes larger things generally fall slower than smaller things. It's all about surface area, which feathers have tons of by design, which makes them fall slower than say a solid thing od the same size. They're the exception (size-wise) that proves the rule.. Or something..., I too am not an engineer.

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On 4/11/2021 at 7:55 PM, Bakerjd said:

The dawson pads would be the heaviest ones most likely. Not many companies do anything with 1911 mags. But honestly the best way to add weight where it should be is a tungsten guide rod. 

HA, I remember years ago when i had to find a aluminum, FLGR or go with a shorty, do to the weight limit, how times change LOL

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On 5/4/2021 at 2:10 AM, Bakerjd said:

Gravity is always the same but then you have to take account for outside forces. So really gravity has nothing to do with the mag leaving the gun easier, faster. Just look at the old idea of a feather and something solid of the same weight. Gravity pulls each down with the same force but the feather takes longer. I'm sure their is some mathematical theory that explains this but I'm not an engineer. 

The first sentence is correct. The second sentence is at first wrong. In a vacuum all things fall at 9.8m/sec2 ( squared).  It has everything to do with falling objects.  You are correct that aerodynamics has an effect.
Back to Newton’s Laws.

 It is physics, math is the tool of physics. Fluid dynamics is usually in engineering and physics classes but that is old school. 
 

I am not an engineer (RPE), although my course work and experience qualified to become a registered professional engineer (my dad).  I did spend six years doing high energy physics research- think rail gun. 
 

sorry I was being anal about this. 

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7 hours ago, pjb45 said:

The first sentence is correct. The second sentence is at first wrong. In a vacuum all things fall at 9.8m/sec2 ( squared).  It has everything to do with falling objects.  You are correct that aerodynamics has an effect.
Back to Newton’s Laws.

 It is physics, math is the tool of physics. Fluid dynamics is usually in engineering and physics classes but that is old school. 
 

I am not an engineer (RPE), although my course work and experience qualified to become a registered professional engineer (my dad).  I did spend six years doing high energy physics research- think rail gun. 
 

sorry I was being anal about this. 

Nothing to be sorry about. I actually like to learn the technical aspect of stuff. You would be amazed at how knowing how the mechanics of parts work helps me being a heavy equipment mechanic. 

 

Side note, it always amazes me that people dont understand flow vs. pressure and how they are not linear in a hydraulic system. People also dont understand how hydraulic systems work in general terms yet have worked on them for YEARS. A basic understanding of the parts required and their basic functions is key to troubleshooting the systems.

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