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Is it possible to have this barrel modified to use a DX style front sight?  I would like to use nite sights at indoor matches and fiber optic outdoor.  I know most ICORE is outdoors, but there is an indoor club match close to my house (Yorktown, VA).  Probably gonna cut off the end of the barrel at the same time.  I have noticed (and read) that the comp doesn't do much, if anything.  I don't use it, since I shoot limited.  But that area gets leaded-up.  Not going to touch anything until after the ICORE east-coast regionals.  Thanks to TK Custom, it runs like a champ.  

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It’s an easy task for a machinist. Mill off the factory front sight and install a base from Bowen. Probably an hour at a machine shop with a 1/4” end mill and tap.

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Be aware the DX front sights can come off if you catch them on the edge of a port. I have a detent ball behind the front sight spring of my 627 to increase the tension on the  sight blade.

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3 hours ago, NoSteel said:

I cut the nub off mine and recrossed,  much easier to keep clean and a better look.

698C5F35-D89D-4EC1-8C99-CB2FEB83382D.jpeg

This is exactly what I want to do.

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2 hours ago, PatJones said:

Be aware the DX front sights can come off if you catch them on the edge of a port. I have a detent ball behind the front sight spring of my 627 to increase the tension on the  sight blade.

How did you do it?

 

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6 hours ago, Rob5r said:

How did you do it?

 

It's been a few years since I've had the sight out, and this is from memory so bear with me.

 

My old Dawson sight had a smaller foot on it than my current one does. The new ones stay in better than the ones from 8 year's ago did. I don't remember if I had to take the detent ball out to get the new sight in.

 

Take the sight out. There's a small pin that retains the spring. Drive that out, take out all the parts, and put a small detent ball behind the spring. I do remember it wasn't the biggest detent ball that would fit in the hole. Resemble. A longer spring would do the same thing if you have one, we're just using the detent ball as a spacer to increase spring pressure.

 

If you're changing sights regularly you might find the added spring tension to be a pain. I never change my sight.

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16 hours ago, ysrracer said:

Here's a 929 barrel I had modified to shoot .22s thru. Welded up, and re-rifled.

 

 

23963.jpeg

Who did this work? I’m assuming you put it into a K frame? 

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1 hour ago, MWP said:

Who did this work? I’m assuming you put it into a K frame? 

 

I'm just joking, it's a 617 barrel I had cut down, and a Bowen block installed.

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18 hours ago, Rob5r said:

How did you do it?

 

Believe it or not,  no machine work here.  The “nub” was removed with a quality hack saw blade. Files then used to get the contour flat/shaped as I wanted.  11 degree piloted crown cutter was used to get the muzzle crown down. Filling the threaded hole was a little trickier.   Enlarged opening slightly to approx. size of stainless socket head bolt supplied with comp(1/8” deep).  Threaded in with lock tite and then filed to match contour.  Finished with scotch brite to desired finish.  In all, 2 hrs work...  My original crown was of less than desirable quality as many are so this work definitely helps to improve accuracy and cause less muzzle build up..  And just plain looks better!!!

Edited by NoSteel
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19 hours ago, NoSteel said:

I cut the nub off mine and recrowned,  much easier to keep clean and a better look.

698C5F35-D89D-4EC1-8C99-CB2FEB83382D.jpeg

 

Is there a best angle for the crown for accuracy?

Really like the looks above.

 

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3 minutes ago, IHAVEGAS said:

 

Is there a best angle for the crown for accuracy?

Really like the looks above.

 

That question could start a huge debate....  I went for the “Look” I wanted!!  

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There is no magic crown angle. anything from flat to 45 degrees works fine. What matters is if it's concentric to the bore. Benchrest rifles often have a flat crown or a flat counterbore. Can't go wrong with that. When you start making an angle or radius, it has to be exactly centered on the bore to shoot good groups. Most of the Smith revos I've seen with the rounded crown are off center a little to a lot, and can easily be improved on with a piloted cutter.

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1 hour ago, Toolguy said:

There is no magic crown angle. anything from flat to 45 degrees works fine. What matters is if it's concentric to the bore. Benchrest rifles often have a flat crown or a flat counterbore. Can't go wrong with that. When you start making an angle or radius, it has to be exactly centered on the bore to shoot good groups. Most of the Smith revos I've seen with the rounded crown are off center a little to a lot, and can easily be improved on with a piloted cutter.

I agree 100%.  And this is why you should always clean from the chamber to the muzzle when possible.   Many of my rifles have bore guides to help prevent damage to the crown.  I should probably try to make something for my revolvers.  Using a bore snake for now.  Would like to find an Allison Speed brush too.

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3 hours ago, Toolguy said:

There is no magic crown angle. anything from flat to 45 degrees works fine. What matters is if it's concentric to the bore. Benchrest rifles often have a flat crown or a flat counterbore. Can't go wrong with that. When you start making an angle or radius, it has to be exactly centered on the bore to shoot good groups. Most of the Smith revos I've seen with the rounded crown are off center a little to a lot, and can easily be improved on with a piloted cutter.

As Warren says the Crown needs to be square.  The reason for a recessed crown is it's harder to damage the rifling by accidentally smacking it into something.  Especially for a handgun.

Edited by pskys2
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I build rifles for a living. I use a recessed 90° crown on the rifles I build.

 

If you measure the grooves in the rifling on a cut rifle barrel, you will see that the grooves very in depth due to the manufacturing process. In an angled crown, the the shallower lands will release the gas sooner than the deeper ones. This can kick the base of the bullet slightly to one side as it leaves the barrel.

 

Flat crowns are easily damaged by improper cleaning. An angled crown is much more resistant to cleaning rod damage.

 

In handgun world, especially our game, I don't think there's any noticable accuracy difference between different crown types as long as they're straight. I think the durability of an angled crown wins out in our application.

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