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Camera on tripod placed in the stage


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I cannot find any USPSA rules about placing camera/tripod within a stage.  I have seen people put camera/tripod downrange.  What's the general consensus on do's and don'ts?  For example, it should not be within the fault line, should not be directly on the path of shooter movements, etc.  I am thinking along the lines of not "modifying the stage" by introducing new elements to the stage from shooter to shooter. 

 

How about clipping a GoPro on top of some walls? 

 

Is this something that requires MD approval?

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1 hour ago, Dazhi said:

I cannot find any USPSA rules about placing camera/tripod within a stage.  I have seen people put camera/tripod downrange.  What's the general consensus on do's and don'ts?  For example, it should not be within the fault line, should not be directly on the path of shooter movements, etc.  I am thinking along the lines of not "modifying the stage" by introducing new elements to the stage from shooter to shooter. 

 

How about clipping a GoPro on top of some walls? 

 

Is this something that requires MD approval?

Not MD approval unless it has been stipulated “no photography” during matches. It’s rare but some clubs have undercover operator types that don’t want cameras used. 
As far as normal run of the mill matches go, the RO on the stage can approve/dictate camera locations. In my experience polite shooters ask if and where they can put a camera

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Local guy around me has a sweet setup.  He has a 13 foot monopod that attaches to his cart with a GoPro mounted on top.  It captures all the action and is high enough that no one can stand in front of it.  Controls everything from his phone.

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A tripod should not be placed inside the fault-lines as the competitor may find themselves in a position where they have to shoot around the camera in order to hit the targets.  

 

Also, some stages are laid out in such a way that there is nowhere to place the camera where it would not be hit by a bullet. 
 

From 2009-2014 I never had issues with RO’s preventing me from placing my camera down-range; That changed from 2017 onwards when I started getting pushback from some Range Officers who stated that the camera was a distraction to the competitors. None of the shooters ever complained so I do wonder if there was/is some guidance from NROI that discourages down-range photography. 
 

Personally, I think the down-range camera will typically capture better action shots than a camera placed behind the competitor.

 

 

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some folks dont want to be filmed,

and others dont want to do said filmers share of range setup and be delayed by their fiddle farting around with their camera gadgets.

 

I also seriously doubt none of the shooters complained.  They maybe just didnt confront you personally.

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I thought the camera would only be setup during the owners run through the stage, not all the shooters. 
I would prefer to be asked before someone I didn’t know recorded me. You never know where the video will be used. 

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11 hours ago, Cuz said:

I thought the camera would only be setup during the owners run through the stage, not all the shooters. 
I would prefer to be asked before someone I didn’t know recorded me. You never know where the video will be used. 

Area 8 has multiple bays wired up with camera that recorded every shooter. You could purchase the videos of yourself compared to another shooter. 
Cool idea, but also demonstrates that asking for permission to video someone is not in the culture.

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11 hours ago, Cuz said:

I thought the camera would only be setup during the owners run through the stage, not all the shooters. 


I would set my camera up while the RO was reading the written stage briefing so I did not interfere with anyone’s walk-through. I’d take photos of everyone on that squad. Then, if the stage was a good one (offering some good action shots) then I would leave it there and get some shots of the next squad too.

 

This was only for stills; When I was doing the video stuff I would just follow the behind the RO/scorekeeper to get the footage. I’ve never put a video camera down-range, but the ShootingUSA guys used to do that for insert shots.

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One of the TV shows a few years ago had a problem with taping matches with a drone.

Shooters were complaining about it hovering over the target arrays during the match!

I might not enjoy that either.

A camera on a tripod probably wouldn't bother usually.

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a drone sounds not only obnoxious but dangerous especially if it goes off course or has a power issue.  Imagine if that thing flies over to another bay and whacks someone who is firing?

 

I know at some major local matches last year, Bill Duda from "Go Fast, Dont Suck" set up several giant pipe camera/erector set looking platforms (super sturdy) powered by a lawn mower battery in an ammo can at several stages.  These gopro cameras were 15' or higher, way behind the fault line, and did not interfere in any way.   They were on constant record the entire day, so everything/everyone at these stages was captured with the vids for sale on his site.  I think a tall selfie stick or modified painting, gutter cleaning pipe to hold an action camera attached to its own base or range cart is the least invasive and safest way to go.  

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Video is definitely better when done from behind the competitor, as the viewer can see the shooter and the targets.
 

For still shots I still maintain that a down-range camera is better and produces more marketable images. Mirrorless cameras are ideal for this as they are generally smaller than D-SLR’s and have silent shooting. The older D-SLR’s would sound like a mini-machine gun when taking rapid photos, and would clearly be a distraction.

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9 hours ago, 18111811 said:

a drone sounds not only obnoxious but dangerous especially if it goes off course or has a power issue.  Imagine if that thing flies over to another bay and whacks someone who is firing?

 

I know at some major local matches last year, Bill Duda from "Go Fast, Dont Suck" set up several giant pipe camera/erector set looking platforms (super sturdy) powered by a lawn mower battery in an ammo can at several stages.  These gopro cameras were 15' or higher, way behind the fault line, and did not interfere in any way.   They were on constant record the entire day, so everything/everyone at these stages was captured with the vids for sale on his site.  I think a tall selfie stick or modified painting, gutter cleaning pipe to hold an action camera attached to its own base or range cart is the least invasive and safest way to go.  

Yes!  The “ghost” comparison videos were very cool. They made really obvious where you were losing time 

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Personally have always cleared my camera setup with MD, stage RO and let shooters know where it is.  Tripod wise I've kept it halfway downrange if it's a long running stage, reckon the photos look nice capturing people running towards the camera. Ideally behind a barrel so it's not sticking out like a sore thumb right in front of the shooter, less of a temptation to be a visual distraction.

Wireless remote, burst = a whole lot of fun.

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