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D Class: Focus on slow A zone first?


leam
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I've been in and out of shooting, and never really got past D. We ran a couple of classifier drills yesterday and my accuracy, formerly my best skill, was bad. Multiple Mikes and NSs. Found myself jerking the trigger and moving the gun SHO/WHO, even when focusing on an A zone sight picture. Am I correct in thinking that my training focus should be on slow A zone hits?

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I'd pick up an Anderson's or Stoeger's book on dry fire drills.  You can make big gains without firing a shot.  They will help with all aspects, including trigger control.  Good luck to you...

Edited by BadShot
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2 hours ago, leam said:

I've been in and out of shooting, and never really got past D. We ran a couple of classifier drills yesterday and my accuracy, formerly my best skill, was bad. Multiple Mikes and NSs. Found myself jerking the trigger and moving the gun SHO/WHO, even when focusing on an A zone sight picture. Am I correct in thinking that my training focus should be on slow A zone hits?

Slow can mean different things to different shooters. I once told a new shooter to focus on getting hits and not worry about time. Shot a 20 second stage in about a minute and a half.😊

Now I usually just say try to shoot alphas as fast as you can and when NS or hard cover are involved shoot for the center of the brown. 

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If you have been in and out and not getting past D in qualifiers I think you need to stop and regroup and find some qualified help . as in an active IDPA or USPSA shooter, not a tactical Timmy.

While I can get being D class at matches due to physical issues, most classifiers tend to be stand and shoots with limited movement.

"Practice doesnt make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect" D.R. Middlebrook.

Not knocking you in the least, you are obviously here to get better. I just think you need a fresh look to get you on the right track to more perfect practice.
Could also be a gun, sight, ammo, issue.. Think you should start from scratch.

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5 hours ago, Sarge said:

Slow can mean different things to different shooters. I once told a new shooter to focus on getting hits and not worry about time. Shot a 20 second stage in about a minute and a half.😊

Now I usually just say try to shoot alphas as fast as you can and when NS or hard cover are involved shoot for the center of the brown. 

 

Some years ago I was an IDPA SO, and we had a new guy show up. Lots of enthusiasm for "run and gun", not much in the way of accuracy. He ran fast and may have hit once or twice, not sure. I took him to another bay and *walked* him through a stage. Emphasis on "walk".   :)

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51 minutes ago, Joe4d said:

If you have been in and out and not getting past D in qualifiers I think you need to stop and regroup and find some qualified help . as in an active IDPA or USPSA shooter, not a tactical Timmy.

While I can get being D class at matches due to physical issues, most classifiers tend to be stand and shoots with limited movement.

"Practice doesnt make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect" D.R. Middlebrook.

Not knocking you in the least, you are obviously here to get better. I just think you need a fresh look to get you on the right track to more perfect practice.
Could also be a gun, sight, ammo, issue.. Think you should start from scratch.

 

Hey Joe, I hear what you're saying. However, as a former NRA instructor and current USPSA RO, I can assure you that it's the trigger monkey. I did actually make C in Steel, but haven't shot that in a while. There are at least two core issues; "lack of practice" and "zero natural talent". Can't change the latter, but working on the former should compensate.

 

In yesterday's practice I went past my speed capability. For example, in 03-18 I had 15 A, 7 C, and 2 D with times of 18.96 and 17.95. That was my first run of the day, and I wasn't really settled mentally. The Sig P320 fits my hand nicely, and most of those A hits were because of the fit. In the second setup (03-11) I tried to go faster and the No Shoot paid the price.

 

Really, at less than 30 yards I should not have anything besides lower A hits if there's no time pressure. Mentally accepting that I'm physically not created to be an "operator" should let me shoot within my limits. Figuring out how to deal with the over-active conscious "stay on target, squeeze trigger, stay on target, squeeze trigger" loop will help.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Joe4d said:

If you have been in and out and not getting past D in qualifiers I think you need to stop and regroup and find some qualified help . as in an active IDPA or USPSA shooter, not a tactical Timmy.

While I can get being D class at matches due to physical issues, most classifiers tend to be stand and shoots with limited movement.

"Practice doesnt make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect" D.R. Middlebrook.

Not knocking you in the least, you are obviously here to get better. I just think you need a fresh look to get you on the right track to more perfect practice.
Could also be a gun, sight, ammo, issue.. Think you should start from scratch.

 

What he said

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18 minutes ago, leam said:

Figuring out how to deal with the over-active conscious "stay on target, squeeze trigger, stay on target, squeeze trigger" loop will help.

 

Dude, that right there is your problem.  You need to put in the work so that your fundamentals of marksmanship (grip, sight picture, sight alignment, trigger press) are running in your sub-conscious.  Until you do that, you will never be able to make significant progress.

 

@Joe4d advice was dead nuts on.

 

You can't walk yet.  Don't even try to run.

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  • 3 months later...

I came from an Archery background where the center of the bullseye was the most important factor.  Timing was so liberal that it never was an issue.  

 

When I took up guns about 40 years ago I still knew what it takes to shoot the center of the target.  That is what I would call the most important thing.  Know where your shot is going to hit before you shoot it.  Practice this until it's second nature. 

 

Once you start shooting a stage: be it Steel Challenge, USPSA or IDPA your hits are still very important.  You've now added the clock but shouldn't worry about it until you are pushing A or even the top of B class.

 

When the clock goes off don't slow down to hit all A's.  They will come as long as you practice the fundamentals.  Speed needs to be practiced too and pushing yourself at a match, if you can't practice stages, is the second most important thing.

 

YMMV

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