Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Forcing Cone


tomjerry1
 Share

Recommended Posts

You can spray it with Dillon Case Lube about every 50 shots. That is kind of messy. You can shoot only jacketed bullets. You can make sure the cylinder lines up properly with the barrel, make sure the forcing cone is the right size and not rough, correct cylinder gap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm using plated bullets, and am assuming that since this revolver has less than 1k rounds, that lock up should be correct, don't know about cylinder/forcing cone measurement tho. where can I look up the dimensions for a 929?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The back end of the forcing cone hole should be around .020 to .025 larger than the bullet diameter for any caliber. The lockup can be off on even a new gun, but a new one  is more likely to be correct than a well used one.

 

Pull the trigger and hold it back, and there should be a slight amount of side to side cylinder rotation. This is a deliberate design feature to allow the bullet to line up the cylinder to the barrel as it crosses the cylinder gap.

 

If there is no play, it's likely the cylinder is pushed too far counter clockwise by the hand. That will make it shave the bullet on the left side of the forcing cone. This is fixed by using a narrower hand, or filing down the left side of the nose of the original one.

 

You can check the cylinder alignment to the barrel with a range rod.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would also ask what you really mean by clean?  sparkly clean like new then your in for lots of work and soaking with solvent and little brushes to keep the nooks and crannies around the barrel and frame clean, and your best bet is the case lube warren suggested.  I tend to clean the functional areas and maybe the outside of the gun but just accept that the area around the barrel inside the frame will forever be filthy, because if I spend 30 min to get it really clean it will be dirty again after the first moon clip.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, MikeBurgess said:

I tend to clean the functional areas and maybe the outside of the gun but just accept that the area around the barrel inside the frame will forever be filthy, because if I spend 30 min to get it really clean it will be dirty again after the first moon clip.

I know that, everyone knows that. But I can’t stop cleaning it. I does nothing, yet still I clean. Please send help.

 

 

13 hours ago, tomjerry1 said:

I'm using plated bullets, and am assuming that since this revolver has less than 1k rounds, that lock up should be correct, don't know about cylinder/forcing cone measurement tho. where can I look up the dimensions for a 929?

I’ve found that plated does nothing, in fact it was slightly dirtier relative to my .358 coated bullets. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, RangerMcFadden said:

I know that, everyone knows that. But I can’t stop cleaning it. I does nothing, yet still I clean. Please send help.

 

 

 

does digging the chucks out with a pocket knife count as cleaning it?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, MikeBurgess said:

does digging the chucks out with a pocket knife count as cleaning it?

 

This makes your pocket knife dull, better to leave the chunks in the gun

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am a bit obsessive about chunks, but do believe that I will have to accept a certain amount of dirt. I can clean 2 1911s in the time it took me to clean this revolver, I'll get over it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 minutes ago, tomjerry1 said:

I am a bit obsessive about chunks, but do believe that I will have to accept a certain amount of dirt. I can clean 2 1911s in the time it took me to clean this revolver, I'll get over it.

the worst part is the 1911 will appear cleaner after 500 rounds than the revo after 8

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lewis Lead Remover https://www.brownells.com/gun-cleaning-chemicals/patches-mops/lead-remover/lewis-lead-remover-prod21587.aspx is what I use.

 

It has a tapered plug that a brass screen type patch is over it.  You assemble it with the rod in the barrel, pull it tight and rotate.  If you have lead built up it will remove it.

I've even used the plug with a patch soaked in JB Bore Compounds and smoothed out some rough spots in a forcing cone.

 

Casey also make a Lead Remover Cloth that works pretty good https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1022286936?pid=236405.

 

Both work pretty good.  With Jacketed Bullets you usually have lead exposed at the base and it can still lead slightly.  Plated bullets, unless over crimped so much the plating is pierced, don't lead at all.  Neither will JHP/JSP or CMJ bullets.  Coated bullets aren't bad either.  Unless actually using Lead Bullets with Lube in the grooves or Swaged Bullets you won't really see much leading, it's more likely powder residue, carbon, and that should clean up with most bore cleaners or the Lead Remover Cloth.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, tomjerry1 said:

yep, those are dirty, mine after 128 rounds and cleaning. I'll have to learn to let it get dirtier before cleaning, that will be hard.

929.jpg

To quote Jerry, "If you get them too clean they get a complex"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From Schuemann barrels barrel cleaning pdf:

 

"My Personal Practice has become to never clean the bore of my barrels. I do use a brass rod to scrape the deposits out of the chamber. But, I've learned to leave the bore alone and it very slowly becomes shinier and cleaner all by itself. Years ago I occasionally scrubbed the bore with a brass bore brush. But, doing so always seemed to cause the bore to revert to a dirtier look with more shooting, so I eventually stopped ever putting anything down the bore except bullets..."

 

I don't take it that far but I've seen more guns damaged by cleaning than shooting. My 627 shows some finish wear from periodically scrubbing deposits  off of the gun.

Edited by PatJones
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, PatJones said:

These guns are "Clean"

16146428506422370382065188841483.jpg

The Casey Lead Remover Cloth works very well on my SS Revolvers, cleans up that carbon from the cylinder pretty easily.  It can damage bluing though and is not recommended for blued guns.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just got some "carbon fouling remover" that works well/ Better than Hoppes #9 but doesn't smell as good.

This thread makes me feel better.

A new friend came over to shoot SC at my range. We shot for 3 or so weeks a couple times a week. I had a "big" match coming up so I cleaned my 929 and polished it with Flitz. He came over the day before the match and when I went to the shooting box he said, "Oh you got a new gun!" I said, "No same one I have been using". "Can't be" he said, "the other one is blue!!"

"Oh, yeah..."

Clean don't make 'em fast!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...