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Dry fire training for proper grip


Gene_WI
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There are none afaik. But all drills that involve handling the gun in presentation to target should help. Every time I grip the gun I consciously focus on my new grip until the day it comes subconscious. I also validate it in live fire frequently to be very sure its the right grip for the recoil management Im working for. 
Fwiw, Im A class in ipsc Open at the moment. 

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I kinda made few for myself.
 

I don’t really call grip a “grip” anymore, but “platform”, since it includes not only fingers-wrist, but also elbows-shoulders. 
 

I had to change my platform habits to straighten my elbows more in order to improve recoil control and even pure transition speed (rotating from angle a to angle b), which affected my grip, since elbows angle changes wrist’s muscle geometry.

Doubles and Bill Drills at same distance in live fire work the best to find most stiff configuration wrist-to-shoulder configuration. I recommend doing it well rested, like 2+ days of no gym, no dry fire, and enough nutrients and sleep. 

 

Once you learn what your platform looks like - work on making it a habit in dry-fire. 


things I do in dry fire for that:

 

1 remember how best Bill drill in live fire felt felt and aim at a target. Try to recreate angles, tension in muscles. Do some dry fire keeping the “platform” engaged

 

2. Re-establish a platform. Shoot a target once in dry fire, make sure strong hand is in perfect spot, keep trigger to the rear, rack the slide a few times, allowing wrist muscle of strong hand to react to that movement. Keep it straight, try to keep as much of “platform” as possible. This is kinda fake exercise, since you cant rack the slide with full platform due to elbow angles, but it’s a good warmup or in-between exercise. 
 

3 continuing on previous exercise - re-establish the weak hand grip, trigger still to the rear and slide racked. Get perfect platform on a target and try to keep it super tight and focused, while you do the dry-fire with transitions at maximum speed of the reset. I.e. reset the trigger and instantly shoot the target, as fast as possible. That gives you a sensation of a “split”. Now using dead trigger continue dry-fire run with all splits and transitions equal to that first split. I call it dry fire at the speed of the trigger. Try going faster by relaxing your mind and just observing what’s happening, but focusing your grip and vision. That if done properly will absolutely smoke your support hand. 

 

4 Basically re-grip and re-punch-out from holster-out-hands-start-to-meet to target and trigger pull. Mostly working on acquiring platform from the draw faster. Might lead to slower draws at first, but stable stage performance. 

Edited by Stepan
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Thank you both for the suggestions. 

 

I have been running dry fire bill drills with a focus on grip for about a month. I noticed that my par times got higher, and I also had some trigger freeze. Did some live fire today, no trigger freeze, times were slower but the accuracy increased.

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Trigger freeze is usually due to tension in the firing hand. Try locking the wrist w/o tensing the hand. Its a bit counter intuitive as our natural reaction is to grip harder when trying to shoot fast. But w/ focused training it can be done both in df and lf. 

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2 hours ago, BoyGlock said:

natural reaction is to grip harder when trying to shoot fast

 

I think my problem has been the opposite. When I speed up my grip loosens up. My epiphany about that was at the last match I shot, there were two four target arrays, about 5 yards, easy high speed targets. I tore a muscle in my leg earlier in the match, so movement was slow for me, I focused on shooting. First array I shot fast, calling my shots, 6 a 2c. Second array I wanted to really burn it down. Shot very fast like a bill drill, still calling shots, 2 alpha, 2 Charlie, 2 mike. I loosened my grip to pull the trigger faster.

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1 hour ago, Miranda said:

grow muscle.

 

work on wrist strength and finger excercises.

 

people are not good at maintaining a grip on anything.

 

miranda

 

I do grip strength training 4-5 times a week. I think I loosen up my grip when I shoot.

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I still think you are both on the correct path and need more...

 

I force my self to both squeeze and relax

the grow muscle comment is to lower the effort to hold snug.

I have been trying learn to squeeze hard just before I break shot...

without tensing my trigger finger.

 

... from my attempts to build model airplanes...

I can state you can't maintain a uniform grip to clamp.

that is to hold two pieces of balsa just so as the titebond dries... about 10 minutes.

 

do not expect to be able to have your grip be uniform pressure on the pistol.

If your strength is high you can hold firm without creating white knuckles.

then your trigger finger can be loose and you will be able to control the pistol.

 

miranda

 

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9 hours ago, BoyGlock said:

Does this mean you are doing it consciously and you want it done subconsciously? Or is the other way around?

I do it subconsciously. And I want to stop doing that.

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On 1/4/2021 at 11:09 PM, Gene_WI said:

I do it subconsciously. And I want to stop doing that.

For me its the correct technique, unless you mean the support hand? Training to sustain the grip pressure while shooting is not so hard. Shooting a 32 rnd long cof would amount to only a few seconds of actually firing the gun. Dry firing any shooting drill a week or two consciously focusing gripping your desired grip would easily make it subconscious. 

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15 hours ago, BoyGlock said:

For me its the correct technique, unless you mean the support hand? Training to sustain the grip pressure while shooting is not so hard. Shooting a 32 rnd long cof would amount to only a few seconds of actually firing the gun. Dry firing any shooting drill a week or two consciously focusing gripping your desired grip would easily make it subconscious. 

 

I have been doing just that. I changed my dryfire training to focus on grip. Dialed the par times up a bit. Will see how this translates to match performance.

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I have this same issue. When training and competing, my last phrase before I start is 'grip hard.' this brings my thoughts on grip to front of mind and usually works well.

 

I also do some strength training but I'm about to make some of those fat dumbbell grips to continue to improve my grip

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On 1/4/2021 at 2:30 PM, Gene_WI said:

 

I think my problem has been the opposite. When I speed up my grip loosens up. My epiphany about that was at the last match I shot, there were two four target arrays, about 5 yards, easy high speed targets. I tore a muscle in my leg earlier in the match, so movement was slow for me, I focused on shooting. First array I shot fast, calling my shots, 6 a 2c. Second array I wanted to really burn it down. Shot very fast like a bill drill, still calling shots, 2 alpha, 2 Charlie, 2 mike. I loosened my grip to pull the trigger faster.

Were you really calling your shots? 

 

If so why did you leave 2 mikes? 

 

Sounds like your conscious thoughts were about speed instead of visual patience to see what you need to.

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11 hours ago, my00wrx1 said:

Were you really calling your shots? 

 

If so why did you leave 2 mikes? 

 

Sounds like your conscious thoughts were about speed instead of visual patience to see what you need to.

 

Could be the latter, I did have a sight picture for every shot on both arrays. Will see at the next match if I identified my problem correctly. I also started doing some metronome work, to see how fast I can go while maintaining a death grip on the gun. It has been very eye opening. Around 225-250 BPM (.25 sec split) I start loosening up the grip in order to go faster.

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18 hours ago, my00wrx1 said:

Steve Anderson's podcast has some good information on dry fire and shot calling.

 

Steve Anderson is probably one of the best trainers I have ever met. I had the pleasure of taking a class from him.

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On 1/9/2021 at 11:13 AM, Gene_WI said:

 

Steve Anderson is probably one of the best trainers I have ever met. I had the pleasure of taking a class from him.

Where did you take his class? Would love to try to get him at my local range but I don't have the time to set something up.

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2 hours ago, Intheshaw1 said:

Where did you take his class? Would love to try to get him at my local range but I don't have the time to set something up.

 

He was at the Vortex range December 2019. I think they plan on having him teach more classes there.

Edited by Gene_WI
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