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Glock inc back to making 1st Gen 17's


dirty whiteboy
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  • dirty whiteboy changed the title to Glock inc back to making 1st Gen 17's
1 hour ago, dirty whiteboy said:

Saw one in a LGS today, for some reason they mark the slide with P80, but it was def a Glock product. Price was too steep for me to consider though at $699

Sorry if this has already been discussed.

 

P80 is what they were sold as outside the US. Glock 17 was the US model. 

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Hello: They will be cool for someone who likes to collect pistols. I found the gen 1's to be slippery in the hand and like the Gen 2's more. I really don't like the finger grooves for my large hands so the Gen 5 is my current favourite. I will see how my Gen 5 17 MOS is when it gets here. Thanks, Eric

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2 hours ago, dirty whiteboy said:

Not interested, there has to be a reason Glock Inc quit making Gen 4's. I'm not a fan of removable backstraps either. Glock should have stayed with the Gen 2 platform as far as I'm concerned.

 

My understanding is the Gen5 replaced the Gen4, that is why the Gen4 was discontinued. The Gen3 is still made for the California market as that was the last generation on the roster. The California market keeps the demand for the Gen3 in place. 

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I have a few Gen 1 model 17s, with the tupperware box, just kind of like them. Also have a first Gen 19, which is really a second Gen. Something about the old Glocks I like the look and feel, I am going to have to keep an eye out at the LGS now.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Mike L. said:

 

My understanding is the Gen5 replaced the Gen4, that is why the Gen4 was discontinued. The Gen3 is still made for the California market as that was the last generation on the roster. The California market keeps the demand for the Gen3 in place. 

Maybe, but a lot of new Gen 3's showing up in LGS , so Glock is pushing them out as more than just a Cali gun, I'm thankful.

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We have a couple in our LGS... I was able to fondle it for some time, but it makes me even less of a Glock fan.  It felt very “plastic” but that probably because most Glocks we sell get sent to our back shop for stippling.  It’s definitely one of those relics that can be appreciated for its age though.

Edited by bcane98
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7 hours ago, bcane98 said:

We have a couple in our LGS... I was able to fondle it for some time, but it makes me even less of a Glock fan.  It felt very “plastic” but that probably because most Glocks we sell get sent to our back shop for stippling.  It’s definitely one of those relics that can be appreciated for its age though.

Skateboard tape would stick nicely to a Gen 1 frame, so it seems. 

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On 10/28/2020 at 11:51 AM, Mike L. said:

 

P80 is what they were sold as outside the US. Glock 17 was the US model. 

 

P80 is the Austrian military designation for the Glock 17, just like M9 is the US military designation for the Beretta 92FS as accepted by the DoD.  The Glock 17 is sold as the Glock 17 everywhere in the world to commercial customers.

 

Glock did not make firearms of any kind until the Austrian armed forces issued a request for bid for a new service handgun.  Gaston Glock hired some engineers with firearm design knowledge and put them together with his own engineers who understood plastic injection molding and they started cranking out prototypes until they came up with something they were confident would win the contract.

 

IIRC, but I'm not sure, Glock model numbers are internal project numbers.  Not all of them make them to production which is why there are some gaps.

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14 hours ago, Chutist said:

Here's the whole story...

Sort of like the original but not the Tenifer (SP?) coating:

https://lipseysguns.com/lipseys-exclusive-retro-glock-p80/

 

 

 

The slide is nitrocarburized just like it's always been.  Whether the process is trade-named Tenifer, Melonite, QPQ, or some other clever name, it's still the same basic process.

 

BTW, Tenifer (and anything else remotely like it) is not a coating.  It's a case hardening heat treatment.

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My Dealer has one of these. It was priced higher than a Glock 17 Gen 3 setting next to it. The 80 Retro Glock didn't have a rail and the grip texture didn't look as good as the Gen 3. Think I'll pass even if the price comes down. About the only think I liked was the original tubberwear type box the Retro came in. Wish Glock would go back to it although there would be less room for a third magazine and the stupid lock.

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10 hours ago, SGT_Schultz said:

 

The slide is nitrocarburized just like it's always been.  Whether the process is trade-named Tenifer, Melonite, QPQ, or some other clever name, it's still the same basic process.

 

BTW, Tenifer (and anything else remotely like it) is not a coating.  It's a case hardening heat treatment.

That's not what they said in the video, something about the chemicals required being outlawed in the EU.  But what do they know? 

 

Ya got me, coating, plating, paint, external finish, case harding...yucky chemical stuff that keeps my PEW PEW from rusting...... 🤣

Semantics.....  

 

Edited by Chutist
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24 minutes ago, Chutist said:

That's not what they said in the video, something about the chemicals required being outlawed in the EU.  But what do they know? 

 

 

I've been a manufacturing engineer for 25 years and heat treatment of steel is one of my areas of professional expertise.  But what would I know?

 

Do you believe everything you see on the internet?  I don't.

 

PS, rust resistance isn't the reason why steel is nitrocarburized.  It's a nice side effect, but not why it's picked.

Edited by SGT_Schultz
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1 hour ago, SGT_Schultz said:

 

I've been a manufacturing engineer for 25 years and heat treatment of steel is one of my areas of professional expertise.  But what would I know?

 

Do you believe everything you see on the internet?  I don't.

 

PS, rust resistance isn't the reason why steel is nitrocarburized.  It's a nice side effect, but not why it's picked.

 

Is nitrocarburizing the same as salt bath nitriding?  Or are they different processes?

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3 hours ago, SGT_Schultz said:
3 hours ago, Chutist said:

That's not what they said in the video, something about the chemicals required being outlawed in the EU.  But what do they know? 

 

 

I've been a manufacturing engineer for 25 years and heat treatment of steel is one of my areas of professional expertise.  But what would I know?

 

Do you believe everything you see on the internet?  I don't.

 

I don't, either.

 

But when I was employed at GLOCK I learned that they did in fact apply for the proper licensing when they wanted to 'import' the Tinifer finish. They had started making more and more of the major components here in the US, and the Tinifer seemed like a reasonable next step. 

 

Once the EPA reviewed the application, I was led to believe they did not say "No". . .they said "Hell, No!"

 

===================

Anyway, I uncovered this proviso regarding GLOCK's previously preferred finish while reading the linked Wiki article.

 

 

Quote

 

Postoxidation black oxide[edit]

An additional step can be added to the nitrocarburizing process called postoxidation. When properly performed, postoxidation creates a layer of black oxide (Fe3O4), that greatly increases the corrosion resistance of the treated substrate while leaving an aesthetically attractive black color.[26] Since the introduction of the Glock pistol in 1982, this type of nitrocarburizing with postoxidation finish has become popular as a factory finish for military style handguns.

 

 

 

 

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49 minutes ago, ima45dv8 said:

 

I don't, either.

 

But when I was employed at GLOCK I learned that they did in fact apply for the proper licensing when they wanted to 'import' the Tinifer finish. They had started making more and more of the major components here in the US, and the Tinifer seemed like a reasonable next step. 

 

Once the EPA reviewed the application, I was led to believe they did not say "No". . .they said "Hell, No!"

 

===================

Anyway, I uncovered this proviso regarding GLOCK's previously preferred finish while reading the linked Wiki article.

 

 

 

 

 

I'm not sure what exactly the EPA objected to.

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