Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

My 10mm ejects brass into next county


Recommended Posts

It is a Sig Tac Ops.

 

I have no idea what weight the stock recoil spring is.

 

I also have no idea what weight the hammer spring is.

 

If I switched to a heavier recoil spring, would that keep the brass from getting flung so far?

 

if so, which weight?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would assume it would...but it also might cause other issues...failure to cycle, excessive slamming of the slide into the frame going forward, different recoil impulse in the ejection stroke and feeding stroke...

 

You could try tuning the extractor and the ejector...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Flat bottom dining pin stop will help but you will also need to up the springs 22 -24 for recoil and 23# main is what I run on most the 10’s if your using real 10mm Ammo 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Chills1994 said:

It is a Sig Tac Ops.

I have no idea what weight the stock recoil spring is.

I also have no idea what weight the hammer spring is.

If I switched to a heavier recoil spring, would that keep the brass from getting flung so far?

if so, which weight?

 

In my experience with 5" 1911s chambered in 10mm you'll never be able to get them to drop the empty brass anywhere near you using full power factory ammo.

 

  1. As Bud pointed out the first thing to do is fit a flat bottom firing pin stop.  I prefer the oversized flat bottom EGW version of these stops.  Flat bottom firing pin stops increase the amount of force needed by the slide to push the hammer back.  This robs energy from slide which results in lowering the slide velocity. 
     
  2. You'll also want to swap out the mainspring for a heavier than standard Wolff mainspring (hammer spring).  Wolff offers heavier than standard mainsprings in these weights: 25, 26, 28, 30 & 34lbs.  Standard weight is 23lbs.  I recommend getting one of each weight so you can experiment to find the one you like the best.
     
  3. The flat bottom firing pin stop combined with the heavier than standard mainspring are more efficient at slowing the rearward velocity of the slide than the recoil spring alone.  Wolff also offers heavier than standard recoil springs in the following weights: 17, 18.5, 20, 22, 23, 24, 26, & 28lbs.  Again, I recommend getting one of each weight so you can experiment.

 

I've experimented with multiple combinations of the two spring types above and never could get full house, fire breathing 10mm factory ammo to drop the empty brass any closer than about twelve feet away.  This ain't your grandpa's .45.  On the other hand, your SIG may have been fitted in such a way that the three things listed above may possibly work to tame the beast sufficiently to enable you to recover your brass.

Edited by Steve in Allentown PA
Link to post
Share on other sites

I brought a 16 foot by 16 foot tarp with me.

 

Most of my brass was landing on it.

 

The center of my tarp was a good 11 steps away at my 4 or 5 o’clock.

 

Thanks for all of the replies.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

you may also try shortening the ejector to something more like a GI profile, the longer the slide has to slow down before the brass hits the ejector the slower the bass will be moving when it exits.

 

I had similar issues with a Tanfoglio in 10mm, there is something about the length of 10mm brass and how that reacts to being ejected that makes it fly further, with equal power factor loads using same bullet and powder at close to the same OAL the 10mm brass would fly about triple the distance of 40 SW brass from the same gun with only a barrel swap (same main and recoil springs)

Link to post
Share on other sites

OP, I'd be careful with some of the suggestions above.  It is true you tune your gun to your load by varying the FPS, recoil spring and mainspring.  For instance, a consequences of using an extra heavy mainspring with a flat bottomed PFS are a lot more stress on the hammer and it makes racking the slide a LOT harder.

 

When I tune a gun I vary those three components to eliminate battering, reduce felt recoil and minimize muzzle rise.  If the optimal combination of those three still result in your brass being tossed far (I'll bet they will) then bring your tarp.  I use a brass catcher that bullseye shooters use when I'm firing in at narrow range of targets (5' wide).  Any wider than that and you need a bigger, more expensive catcher.  I'd use your tarp.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm with zzt on this.  I'd be far more concerned on how the gun operates and how it shoots, i.e., recoil impulse, return to zero, etc. vs. where the brass goes.  If the gun is tuned correctly, and you have decent technique, the brass should fly pretty consistently to one spot, although maybe further than you like.  But at least you know where it's going and can arrange a tarp or something to catch it. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I  went the route of a 25 LBS mainspring, a 24 lbs recoil spring and an EGW flat pin stop.  The brass ejects about 12-16 feet but is a tight group.   Moderate range loads (180 at 1200 fps).  I can also shoot  40 S&W level loads of 180's in 10 mm brass at 1025 fps with perfect function.  The ejection distance is 6-8 feet.  As stated, you'd better man up to run the slide.  The guns are a single stack and a double stack Rock Island.  They have been phenomenal ,  kill hogs dead.   I pack the SS a lot, lately.  I fit a 40 S&W barrel to each, and the double stack is now my poor mans limited gun. a barrel and spring change and I can shoot 40 or 10. It runs like a thresher, but the jerk running the trigger malfunctions to much...

Jason

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ditto on others.  Stock 45 mainspring is 23# and works even with my "barely major" loads, so I'd want a few clicks more more to absorb initial slide energy on 10mm.  

Edited by johnmyster
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/5/2020 at 12:30 PM, ltdmstr said:

I'm with zzt on this.  I'd be far more concerned on how the gun operates and how it shoots, i.e., recoil impulse, return to zero, etc. vs. where the brass goes.  If the gun is tuned correctly, and you have decent technique, the brass should fly pretty consistently to one spot, although maybe further than you like.  But at least you know where it's going and can arrange a tarp or something to catch it. 

I had that stage Smoke and Hope set up, so most of the brass was landing on the tarp depending on which targets I was shooting at.  Some of the brass still had enough momentum that they bounced/rolled off the tarp and started up the side berm.  

 

I am going to have to make it back out there again with my .45 ACP 1911's to see where their brass lands.  And to see if I can rip off some Bill Drills

 

The Sig 10mm just feels funny in my hands when trying to do Bill Drills.  I can't quite explain it

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Some of it is just momentum physics due to the longer case.... they Fly but ya a 23# main just like Heinie says, and a fitted FP stop will help most.   I ran a 23# recoil sp on my Bilby Pocket Rocket and a 18.5# on my Delta due to extra slide wt 

 

H

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...