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Thinking Of Trying IDPA


OSP737
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I have a club not too far away that is very active in IDPA so I took a ride over there and watched them one evening and it looked like fun.  I've shot bullseye and combat for years and even service rifle so I think I could handle this with some instruction and practice.  Would my Sig 320 X5 Legion be a good gun to start with?  I also have a Glock 34 Gen 5 MOS that I even have a Comp Tac holster for but no magazine pouches for it....yet.  I've looked over the rule book but see I have a lot more reading to do.  Ammo is no problem since I reload my 9mm on a Star progressive but need a load that meets the PF.  I'm open for help.  Thanks.

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Show up with your gun, 3 magazines, an owb holster and two mag pouches. Wear your gear behind your hip bones. Tell them it is your first time to this kind of match and that should smooth over any issues with initial equipment stuff. Undoubtedly someone will tell you where your gear isn't legal, hopefully in a friendly manner.

 

The only thing I'm seeing over and over again from new people is handling their pistol at their trunk or other places not a safe area. Just peek around at where other people are putting their gun on and follow that norm. Then once it is on and in your holster don't do anything with it until told to.

 

Attend the new shooters briefing. It might cause some eye rolling or even confusion but it will also answer some questions.

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I love USPSA and thats my main go to competitive shooting sport venue but I've been intrigued by IDPA, I know they don't allow the CZ Shadow 2 due to its weight but the SPO1 they do.  I a Glock 45 with an optic and I don't know if that's allowed since I don't know the sport, also an Archon Type B C/O.  I know you have to wear some sort of garment and the rules are totally different but I've been intrigued to give a shoot, besides it's a shooting sport so why not?  :) 

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23 hours ago, OSP737 said:

I have a club not too far away that is very active in IDPA so I took a ride over there and watched them one evening and it looked like fun.  I've shot bullseye and combat for years and even service rifle so I think I could handle this with some instruction and practice.  Would my Sig 320 X5 Legion be a good gun to start with?  I also have a Glock 34 Gen 5 MOS that I even have a Comp Tac holster for but no magazine pouches for it....yet.  I've looked over the rule book but see I have a lot more reading to do.  Ammo is no problem since I reload my 9mm on a Star progressive but need a load that meets the PF.  I'm open for help.  Thanks.

Probably already answered in detail before I got here but the Legion is perfect for IDPA.

Take off the mag well, SSP legal.

Leave the Magwell on, ESP legal.

Put on a CO, CO legal.

 

The Glock is also legal for SSP without modification needed.  Go with whichever one you want to shoot.

 

You will need two mag pouches. Your first time you could likely do it without at a local match but you will immediately want them. 

Also, everything that Rowdy B said.

*In addition, watch a youtube video on new shooters for IDPA. They should say the range commands.

*Practice drawing and  - more importantly - holstering at least ten times with an empty pistol. Look at the holster when you holster the pistol. This will get you familiar with much of what is really important: not shooting yourself in the leg.  most people hate that.

 

But bring the gear and don't overthink anything. It will be fun.

Edited by Zincwarrior
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Do it.  I like it and the fact that you don't have to practice a ton to be competitive, have fun and not embarrass yourself.  I'm in the minority since I shot USPSA for 10 years before I shot my first IDPA match.  It fits my schedule and budget better.  Not to mention that with ammo becoming hard to get, the lower round count matches help out as well.  Oh, and the gear is virtually identical to what I wear everyday at work.  

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4 hours ago, chgofirefighter said:

I know you have to wear some sort of garment

 

I wear the same untucked, button up shirts, kydex pancake holster, and kydex concealment mag pouches that I wear when I go about my daily life carrying a pistol.

 

The only concession I make to gaming it is that I shoot my USPSA CO gun (P-10F with SRO) instead of my real carry gun (P-10C with RMR), though I'm sure I could do as well with it.

 

At the end of the day, I'm a 71% USPSA shooter and when I show up at a local IDPA match I pretty much end up in the top five.  Last weekend, I took 2nd overall only because of a fault line procedural.  My raw time was like 6 - 7 seconds faster then the guy who beat me.  USPSA B class is like IDPA master.

Edited by SGT_Schultz
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7 hours ago, SGT_Schultz said:

 

I wear the same untucked, button up shirts, kydex pancake holster, and kydex concealment mag pouches that I wear when I go about my daily life carrying a pistol.

 

The only concession I make to gaming it is that I shoot my USPSA CO gun (P-10F with SRO) instead of my real carry gun (P-10C with RMR), though I'm sure I could do as well with it.

 

At the end of the day, I'm a 71% USPSA shooter and when I show up at a local IDPA match I pretty much end up in the top five.  Last weekend, I took 2nd overall only because of a fault line procedural.  My raw time was like 6 - 7 seconds faster then the guy who beat me.  USPSA B class is like IDPA master.

Wow, a USPSA B class is like a Master in IDPA?  🤨  Interesting...  Curious as to why is that? 

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2 hours ago, chgofirefighter said:

Wow, a USPSA B class is like a Master in IDPA?  🤨  Interesting...  Curious as to why is that? 

I think it's due to Hit Factor vs Time Plus scoring. One rewards risk, the other rewards caution. A person becomes a better shooter by developing their skills. That development is significantly faster by pushing their envelope of performance through experimentation and risk rather than cautious, precise shooting. I gave time plus scoring a chance even with USPSA movement rules, but felt I got worse by shooting the match. 

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6 hours ago, chgofirefighter said:

Wow, a USPSA B class is like a Master in IDPA?  🤨  Interesting...  Curious as to why is that? 

Best thing I can tell you is go and shoot a few.  You'll see why.

 

But let me give you an example.  Last Saturday's IDPA match had a stage with a popper-activated drop turner.  The only one in my squad who dared to shoot the popper, transition to a stationary target, then to the turner was me.  I won that stage by a wide margin.  No one else in my squad thought they could do that successfully because none of them attempted it.

Edited by SGT_Schultz
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7 hours ago, chgofirefighter said:

Wow, a USPSA B class is like a Master in IDPA?  🤨  Interesting...  Curious as to why is that? 

Technically, the range is different. The classes are not perfectly in accord.  Low C class is historically Sharpshooter. High C class is historically Expert.

B at a certain level is the bottom rung of Master, but Master encompasses anyone from good shooter to great shooter.

 

Its easier to classify as Master, but that class encompasses a larger range of shooters.

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7 hours ago, Zincwarrior said:

B at a certain level is the bottom rung of Master, but Master encompasses anyone from good shooter to great shooter.

 

Its easier to classify as Master, but that class encompasses a larger range of shooters.

 

No different than USPSA GM.

 

The point is simple....any halfway decent USPSA A or B class shooter can walk up to any IDPA match and have more than an even chance to end up very near, if not at, the very top.  The reverse, when talking about an IDPA master, is not so assured.

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Right, because the classification weighting is at the lower end. While a B rating makes Master generally in IDPA. Master is USPSA is also Master is IDPA equivalent.

 

Schultz is also correct in that I believe the mix skews more towards lower level shooters in any IDPA match. 

Edited by Zincwarrior
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9 hours ago, SGT_Schultz said:

Best thing I can tell you is go and shoot a few.  You'll see why.

 

But let me give you an example.  Last Saturday's IDPA match had a stage with a popper-activated drop turner.  The only one in my squad who dared to shoot the popper, transition to a stationary target, then to the turner was me.  I won that stage by a wide margin.  No one else in my squad thought they could do that successfully because none of them attempted it.

Thanks SGT_Shultz, I will try an IDPA soon for sure.  I am a clas B in USPSA C/O division, so lets see how it goes...  

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14 hours ago, SGT_Schultz said:

Best thing I can tell you is go and shoot a few.  You'll see why.

 

But let me give you an example.  Last Saturday's IDPA match had a stage with a popper-activated drop turner.  The only one in my squad who dared to shoot the popper, transition to a stationary target, then to the turner was me.  I won that stage by a wide margin.  No one else in my squad thought they could do that successfully because none of them attempted it.

 

Some of this can be explained by the new scoring that started two or three years ago.  One point was .5 seconds, now 1 = 1.  Looking for something to shoot while the popper is activating is riskier than it once was.  If you rush the two shots and shoot a -1 (basically AC) during the half second it takes the drop turner to show, you just lost .5 seconds.  If they started shooting IDPA in the last couple years, they've rarely seen anyone shoot something before the activated swinger/drop turner/whatever and it often doesn't pay off.  

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5 hours ago, SGT_Schultz said:

 

No different than USPSA GM.

 

The point is simple....any halfway decent USPSA A or B class shooter can walk up to any IDPA match and have more than an even chance to end up very near, if not at, the very top.  The reverse, when talking about an IDPA master, is not so assured.

When I hear/read posts like this it's pretty depressing to me.  I was a few percentage points away from Master in Limited when my kid was born and I quit practicing.  A couple years later I started shooting IDPA and the closest I've been to Master was .2 seconds.  

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8 hours ago, deerslayer said:

 

Some of this can be explained by the new scoring that started two or three years ago.  One point was .5 seconds, now 1 = 1.  Looking for something to shoot while the popper is activating is riskier than it once was.  If you rush the two shots and shoot a -1 (basically AC) during the half second it takes the drop turner to show, you just lost .5 seconds.  If they started shooting IDPA in the last couple years, they've rarely seen anyone shoot something before the activated swinger/drop turner/whatever and it often doesn't pay off.  

 

That reinforces the point made by someone else.  Few people in IDPA (at least in my area) seem to be pushing to develop speed AND accuracy.  There are some who do but the vast majority seem to have been sucked into the "slow is smooth smooth is fast" delusion. 

 

They draw slowly (I concede a ultra fast draw is not a huge advantage), they move from place to place slowly, they transition between targets at a glacial speed, they watch poppers fall before shooting the next one, they confirm their shots not by calling from the sights but by looking for hits, they never enter a new position ready to shoot, never shoot on the move, they aren't aware of rule technicalities that they can exploit (fault lines extend back to infinity, re-engaging targets from different positions when able, etc), they pull the magazine out of the pistol instead of letting it drop free from slide lock, and on and on and on.  And I'm talking about middle aged dudes my age or younger.

 

The guy that beat me last weekend did so because I stepped over a fault line.  Remove that fault and I would have taken him by 3 seconds in total time even though I was down 3 points for the match and he was clean.  It's easier to fix a simple footwork error than it is to fix how slow you are.

Edited by SGT_Schultz
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2 hours ago, SGT_Schultz said:

They draw slowly (I concede a ultra fast draw is not a huge advantage), they move from place to place slowly, they transition between targets at a glacial speed, they watch poppers fall before shooting the next one, they confirm their shots not by calling from the sights but by looking for hits, they never enter a new position ready to shoot, never shoot on the move, they aren't aware of rule technicalities that they can exploit (fault lines extend back to infinity, re-engaging targets from different positions when able, etc), they pull the magazine out of the pistol instead of letting it drop free from slide lock, and on and on and on.  And I'm talking about middle aged dudes my age or younger.

 

This is not what I see happening when I shoot IDPA.  

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I have seen such stuff, not routinely but often.  But then I see it a lot by less practiced USPSA shooters, too.

 

Shooting USPSA on the move garnered me a triple procedural last week.

IDPA seldom has a rear fault line, shoot 'em as you see them from behind the "cover" fault line.

So I just reflexively opened up on a close, wide open target as soon as I cleared the divider while in route to the next array I would actually have to aim at.  

"Sorry, bud, you weren't in the Shooting Area when you triple tapped T 6."  

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@deerslayer just won 2nd overall and high A in Limited at the TN Section match here in September of 2020, and has a pretty thick collection of SSP State Champion plaques from back before we both switched over to USPSA.

 

Short of Bob Vogel or Mike Seeklander dropping by to post on Enos, I know who I’d listen to most closely in this thread.
 

A lot of guys like to bash IDPA pretty hard, when it’s really just a different sport entirely.

 

Edited by MemphisMechanic
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