Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

S&W 929: the front screw on the rear sight keeps coming loose


Recommended Posts

I've never used LocTite on any of my revolvers and they have never come loose.
There is a drop of blue on my strain screw, that's it.

If you must Loctite the little screws, use 222 the low strength variety.

--
Pat Jones
Firestone CO
USPSA #A79592

Link to post
Share on other sites

I do not know of any reason to be scared of Loctite. Maybe you folks can educate me though. 

 

Haven't done it on the 929 yet but on another gun I've used the technique shown except held a screwdriver tip to what I wanted to heat with some needle nose pliers and put the torch on the screwdriver tip. Have also been told that melting beeswax on the screw in question can work but do not have any experience with this. 

 

I've owned 2 older Harleys and an air cooled BMW twin, the first time something comes loose it gets the juice.

 

https://www.henkel-adhesives.com/us/en/insights/all-insights/blog/how-to-remove-red-threadlocker.html

 

Edit: And yea, on my 929 I've put blue on the same screw for the same reason. 

Edited by IHAVEGAS
Link to post
Share on other sites

The purple 222 and the blue 242 don't require any heat to remove the screws. Just a regular screwdriver works fine. I don't understand why some people are so paranoid about using the correct grade of Loctite. Just because one person doesn't need it dosen't mean someone else wouldn't benefit from it. Ultimately, everyone has to make their own decisions.  Personally, I use Loctite a lot with no problems.

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Toolguy said:

The purple 222 and the blue 242 don't require any heat to remove the screws. Just a regular screwdriver works fine. I don't understand why some people are so paranoid about using the correct grade of Loctite. Just because one person doesn't need it dosen't mean someone else wouldn't benefit from it. Ultimately, everyone has to make their own decisions.  Personally, I use Loctite a lot with no problems.

 

Yup. This.

 

 

You dont have a problem with it loosening.....until you do.

 

I prefer to take the proper precautions to give myself the best chance of success. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, PatJones said:

There is a drop of blue on my strain screw, that's it.

If you must Loctite the little screws, use 222 the low strength variety.

--
Pat Jones
Firestone CO
USPSA #A79592
 

The people using LocTite on the strain screw have used it to lessen the pressure on the mainspring rather than shortening the screw.

 

A better method than LocTite would be to perform this job.

 

Bm4fuoz.jpg

 

Edited by RePete
Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, RePete said:

The people using LocTite on the strain screw have used it to lessen the pressure on the mainspring rather than shortening the screw.

 

A better method than LocTite would be to perform this job.

 

Bm4fuoz.jpg

 

 

And then use Loctite on the new screw I suppose.

 

Don't most folks just bend the spring?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Most folks don't KNOW that you can just bend the spring. That's what Wolff does. Their #2 spring is just a #1 with a bend in it. You can bend either one of them to make it the other one.

Edited by Toolguy
Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Toolguy said:

Most folks don't KNOW that you can just bend the spring. That's what Wolff does. Their #2 spring is just a #1 with a bend in it. You can bend either one of them to make it the other one.

The ones that do may also find that it is easier to adjust a strain screw then to bend a spring, 

Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, MikeBurgess said:

The ones that do may also find that it is easier to adjust a strain screw then to bend a spring, 

 

On the subject, tracing an outline of the spring before you bend it is handy. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I made a jig to bend the springs.  A 3"x3"x1" block of aluminium, drilled 2 holes about 3/4" apart and drove in 2 roll pins.  Hook the spring in 1 and use the other to perform the bend gently and slow for the desired effect.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, RePete said:

I made a jig to bend the springs.  A 3"x3"x1" block of aluminium, drilled 2 holes about 3/4" apart and drove in 2 roll pins.  Hook the spring in 1 and use the other to perform the bend gently and slow for the desired effect.

 

Can you post a picture?

 

Please?

Link to post
Share on other sites

The way my revolver smith showed me was.

 

1. Trace the outline of the spring so you know how much you bend it.

 

2. Use whatever is handy to stick the spring in (he used an old metal filing cabinet drawer if memory serves) and bend it. 

 

This is not brain surgery. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just hold the bottom end in hand, put the top (hook) end on the bench and thumb in the middle. That gives it a big radius. You don't want tight bends in a mainspring. You can make it more bent or straighter that way.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
On 8/28/2020 at 1:39 PM, Toolguy said:

I just hold the bottom end in hand, put the top (hook) end on the bench and thumb in the middle. That gives it a big radius. You don't want tight bends in a mainspring. You can make it more bent or straighter that way.

 

Exactly.  

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...