Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Lee FCD (factory crimp die) in 9mm, I gots questions


ysrracer
 Share

Recommended Posts

It's set up like a seating die with a knurled knob on top. Do I crimp on the die itself, or do I need to screw in the knurled knob.

It seems like either will work

 

I'm shooting these 9mm in my S&W 929 revolver. Factory ammo has too much bullet creep.

Edited by ysrracer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not for a revolver round.  You’ll want to leave an impression in a coated bullet.

 

the die is set up by having it kiss the shell plate then backing off a little and tighten.  Make sure to check tightness after a few hundred rounds.....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Justy set the die up per the instructions that come with the die.   When you set it up, a half a turn (of knurled knob) for a light crimp, full turn for a heavy crimp.  I recently set up a 40 FCD and did 3/4 of a turn on the knob and it indented a jacketed bullet circumferentially pretty good so I backed it off to 1/2 turn.  Just pull a couple bullets to see if you have too much crimp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not using the knob will remove the bell, but not add any additional crimp. 

I hadn’t thought of this but it makes sense since we are pushing the cartridge through the sleeve. I just switched to coated bullets and I’m getting good results so far with the FCD. I followed the BBI instructions of 1/8 turn past case contact and I’m hundoing them after loading.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, OdinIII said:

I’ll leave this to the more experienced but that is a strong crimp ring. If you are having bullet creep at that crimp level then you may be over crimping and causing deformation in the case that actually reduces bullet holding ability.

 

I haven't shot them yet, I'll let you know tomorrow. In a revolver you need a good crimp.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, MikeyScuba said:

Not for a revolver round.  You’ll want to leave an impression in a coated bullet.

 

I do not, but I am not that experienced with wheel guns compared to many here. 

 

Do you do that so the moon clips drop in more consistently or do you have a different reason?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, IHAVEGAS said:

 

I do not, but I am not that experienced with wheel guns compared to many here. 

 

Do you do that so the moon clips drop in more consistently or do you have a different reason?

 

 

Revolver bullets creep forward, almost like a bullet puller. I've had factory ammo pull out of the case and sit in the cylinder.

 

 

 

 

IMG_20200715_091328593_HDR.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, ysrracer said:

Revolver bullets creep forward, almost like a bullet puller. I've had factory ammo pull out of the case and sit in the cylinder.

 

Understood (I tried the same 115 grain federal and had the same results). 

 

I do not have bullet creep issues (Winchester Brass, U-Die, 0.356 - 0.358 coated) so I was curious if there was an additional reason. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, ysrracer said:

Revolver bullets creep forward, almost like a bullet puller. I've had factory ammo pull out of the case and sit in the cylinder.

 

OK first let me say I am not fussing at you just making an observation.You have three threads on interrelated project/question.(almost had four didn't we)

The crimp you show above is to much. First its a revolver using moon clips pick a single head stamp to use. Second lets make the ammo as short as we can.

That will increase bullet pull in its self. Third lets start over with crimp adjustment.Your initial setting will just barely remove the flair required to start the bullet.

Hears the part most miss others do it and don't realize .You have to go in a little past no flair to an actual crimp .The brass springs back a little.(that's part of the single head stamp)

Adjust slow .Use multi-able cases and bullets.

 

Edited by AHI
Link to comment
Share on other sites

And copper jacketed bullets are usually sold at 0.355 rather than 0.356 (9mm coated) and offer the least friction between bullet and case?

 

Just asking, not making a statement.

 

Other thing, it seems like my kinetic bullet puller tells me a lot about how much the bullets resist moving. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, IHAVEGAS said:

And copper jacketed bullets are usually sold at 0.355 rather than 0.356 (9mm coated) and offer the least friction between bullet and case?

 

Just asking, not making a statement.

 

Other thing, it seems like my kinetic bullet puller tells me a lot about how much the bullets resist moving. 

YES in this application a coated bullet would be best  and in my opinion a plated bullet would be the worst option.

A bullet puller is a great teaching device.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/2/2020 at 1:44 PM, ysrracer said:

 

Revolver bullets creep forward, almost like a bullet puller. I've had factory ammo pull out of the case and sit in the cylinder.

 

 

 

 

IMG_20200715_091328593_HDR.jpg

 

My brother had the same situation in his 929 with factory ammo. I can't remember the brand, maybe Remington or Blazer. But they were definitely 115 gr loads, and some type of bulk pack. And it only did it with that one brand of ammo. What brand were you using?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Postal Bob said:

 

My brother had the same situation in his 929 with factory ammo. I can't remember the brand, maybe Remington or Blazer. But they were definitely 115 gr loads, and some type of bulk pack. And it only did it with that one brand of ammo. What brand were you using?

 

First Federal 115, then Winchester White Box 115. The Federal were worse.

 

I finally gave up and bought some 9mm dies. I loaded up some ammo with Federal Small Pistol Primers, backed of the strain screw a half a turn, and went to the range today.

 

No issues, no light hits, imagine that :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On the FCD, the crimp insert for revolvers will give you a roll crimp, for auto's, a tapper crimp.  The inserts are interchangeable. So, if I am loading a 160 for my revolver, and it will not take a roll crimp, I use the insert for my 9mm.  I also got rid of the knob that came with it and replaced it with a bolt and nut.  This way I can lock the bolt in place and not worry about it moving.  If you are going to be using different inserts, use 2 nuts and lock them together, so you can go back to the exact crimp you had before.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...