Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Where can I buy a 627 cylinder?


ysrracer
 Share

Recommended Posts

You can buy one directly from Smith.

 

But there are some other intricacies that goes in to what you want to do.

 

For the most part cylinders are not typically just " interchangeable " - You mainly need to be concerned with your B/C gap ( the spacing between the face of your cylinder and your barrel forcing cone ) Typically cylinders vary a little bit here and there in over all length, and when it comes to installing a cylinder you need to account for this by setting the B/C gap. This involves either trimming down the forcing cone with some special tooling if the gap is too tight, or if the gap is too big - taking the barrel off and trimming the shoulder back on a lathe.

 

Additionally , you'll need to have both cylinder extractors fit to the gun so that they both time up correctly.  

 

Now, you might get lucky and find a cylinder that is *close enough* to fit, and have a gunsmith tune up the extractors to work together. 

 

Try reaching out to Eli @ TK customs to talk about having the work done. They can do both conversions and gunsmith work.

 

-am 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looking at both 8 shot 627 ratchets and 617 10 shot ratchets they look like they are machine cut. When I went to S&W armorers school (twice) ratchets were cut with a sharpened hand on a target trigger with a steel bar welded on the right side of the trigger. The trigger, rebound and spring were installed in the frame and that is how it is done with side plate screwed in place the the trigger was pulled cutting the ratchets and do not believe that is how it is now done on modern Smiths. For my C19 stay at home project I checked the spare 627 cylinder that I had dropped in, timed up, chambers aligned with the bore, BC gap and head space were the same.I reamed the chambers, got moon clips and off to the races. It takes both 9mm and 38 Super. This is a sample size of one but is was basically a drop in for me. 

Edited by jmax
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have found that about 1/2 the time you can drop in and 1/2 the time you need fitting. Also, the depth inside where the end of the crane barrel goes can vary some. I have had good luck reaming for 38 Super. In mine 9mm still fits and I can still shoot all the 38 rimmed calibers too. The 357s will bulge a little at the bottom, due to the high pressure. I don't shoot many of them anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Toolguy said:

I have found that about 1/2 the time you can drop in and 1/2 the time you need fitting. Also, the depth inside where the end of the crane barrel goes can vary some. I have had good luck reaming for 38 Super. In mine 9mm still fits and I can still shoot all the 38 rimmed calibers too. The 357s will bulge a little at the bottom, due to the high pressure. I don't shoot many of them anyway.

 

Better odds than i've ever had. 

 

Any time i've ever put in a new cylinder ( typically replacing a stainless with a titanium ) it was always so long I couldn't even close the cylinder.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/20/2020 at 2:00 PM, alecmc said:

 

Better odds than i've ever had. 

 

Any time i've ever put in a new cylinder ( typically replacing a stainless with a titanium ) it was always so long I couldn't even close the cylinder.

 

But a gunsmith call fit it right?

 

(I'm not a gunsmith)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

37 minutes ago, ysrracer said:

 

But a gunsmith call fit it right?

 

(I'm not a gunsmith)

 

Well, yah. Assuming they know how. 

 

I explained everything in detail in my other post in this thread.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Dr. Phil said:

So easy a tractor mechanic could do it!

 

The tractor mechanic in Phoenix's name rhymes with glank flem. He screwed up my 929 good.

 

In fact I had to pay Will Ohara here in So Cal to fix it. I should have just taken it to Will to start with. He was astounded at how poorly the first job was done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pinnacle Custom took my 627 and originally cut the cylinder down to 38 short colt length and extended the forcing cone. I then ran across a 38 super cylinder and another 627 cylinder. I sent it all to Mark and asked him to fit the 38 super cylinder which he had to cut the forcing cone and also fit the new 627 cylinder. He had to cut the 627 cylinder to the same length as the 38 super and fit both with perfect timing on both. I am telling you this as he can do wonders and what you are talking about he can do. Whileyou are at it have him make you a custom .356barrel you won’t be disappointed.A3B443C2-196E-4497-9CB9-0CB4FD8BA1AD.jpeg.ec702d378e037d9e99cc70370192b33f.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 6/22/2020 at 4:13 PM, revoman said:

Pinnacle Custom took my 627 and originally cut the cylinder down to 38 short colt length and extended the forcing cone. I then ran across a 38 super cylinder and another 627 cylinder. I sent it all to Mark and asked him to fit the 38 super cylinder which he had to cut the forcing cone and also fit the new 627 cylinder. He had to cut the 627 cylinder to the same length as the 38 super and fit both with perfect timing on both. I am telling you this as he can do wonders and what you are talking about he can do. Whileyou are at it have him make you a custom .356barrel you won’t be disappointed.A3B443C2-196E-4497-9CB9-0CB4FD8BA1AD.jpeg.ec702d378e037d9e99cc70370192b33f.jpeg

Beautiful gun!  Does cutting down the cylinder reduce the trigger pull since there is less mass to move?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, S&W627shooter said:

Beautiful gun!  Does cutting down the cylinder reduce the trigger pull since there is less mass to move?

I don’t know as I have all my revolvers set at 6 lbs. I would think it would as people say that the titanium cylinder which is lighter can give you lighter pull. But if I remember right Apex was getting trigger pull down to 4 to 4 1/2 lbs with steel cylinders. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok, here's the update:

 

I bought an already converted to 9mm / .38 super cylinder from a member here.

 

It drops right in, spins freely. The only issue is when I pull the trigger (my 627 is double action only) the cylinder moves, the lug engages the notch, but then the trigger stops and won't fire.

 

It's almost like the hand/pawl is too long. When comparing the ratchet on my original cylinder to the ratchet on my new cylinder, the new ratchet "bumps" look thicker.

 

I'll take some pictures. I'm sure my gunsmith can get it to fit. I need it to work with both cylinders.

Edited by ysrracer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have your gun smith fit the extractor on the new cylinder to the gun. It's actually a good thing if they are all tight they wont rotate all the way, that means there is room to work with when filing them down.

 

DO NOT MODIFY the hand. 

 

If you change the hand to work on the new cylinder, your old cylinder wont work any more ( slow ) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, PatJones said:

The length of the hand is meaningless. On a Smith & Wesson it's the width of the hand that carries up the cylinder.

--
Pat Jones
Firestone CO
USPSA #A79592
 

 

In my case, the only difference is the extractors. I guess I could try swapping those?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For the 627 Smith machines a step in the hand adjacent to the ratchet. The ratchet on the left appears to use a hand with a shallow cut and the one on the right was fitted with one with a slightly deeper cut with a bit more metal left on the ratchet bearing surface next to the red arrow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brownells sells a file that works on the Extractor Ratchets.  It will have a safe side, as you want to only cut the "bumps" on one side not the face of the Extractor.

It is a trial and error, one step at a time job.  It is easy to cut too much and have slow timing.

Also before you start make sure the chamfers are cut the way you want.  Because opening up the cylinder chamfers can change timing a bit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, ysrracer said:

I'm not a gunsmith, so I'm not touching anything. I think the difference is the angle of this cut. But again, I'm not a gunsmith

 

414448788.jpg

 

The cylinder on the left is my original cylinder, the one on the right is the new one that needs fitting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...