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I don't know what to do with my hands


Rcoe
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Hello all, I'm new here. Hopefully I'll be able to try some USPSA matches this year, and I hope to pick up some advice here. I have never even watched a pistol match, so my first time is going to be even worse than my first time. Any pointer will be appreciated. 

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I have a Beretta that I've got pretty good with. I have a Shadow 2 that I haven't got a chance to shoot yet because they shut down our sportsman's club due to the virus. I have read the rules that would apply to me and the equipment I plan to use. It's the little things I hope to pick up here. I just hope this all clears up soon so I can get to some matches.

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The matter of pointers is pretty wide. People need something a little more specific, so they can start the advice somewhere.

 

Being safe is the first thing, and the rules cover that. Fail something there, and the best case scenario is that your match is over and all you can do is help reset stages.

 

Hit the targets. You might take 4 times the time that the hot shots do - but hit the targets ... We all miss sometimes. But it is not good. Many of us have also forgotten to shoot at a target. I remember a stage where I forgot about 3 targets, in one more doorway.

 

Oh.

Let people at the Match know you are new. Listen to what they say. Look at what they do. Just... don't force yourself to go at their pace.

Enjoy.

Edited by perttime
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I've done some IDPA shooting, but beginners are beginners. Yes, identify yourself as a new shooter, it should get you a safety briefing, and they'll let you shoot last, or at least not first in your stages. You can practice draw, dryfire and target transition at home, empty gun.

My first time out I decided to go slow, be safe, and not worry about time. It really takes the excitement out of the moment, but lets you focus on learning the ropes.

Enjoy yourself!

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Something I wish I would have done, is I knew the basic commands for Starting and completing a stage, or course of fire but I never practiced them before attending my first match.  I wish I would have dry fired those more and created routines before showing up to my first match.  Make sure you understand the commands that will be given to you.  You can find them in the USPSA rule book.  If you have questions you can find enough videos on YouTube of stages being shot to get the just of what the rule book is telling you the commands are and will be.  Dry fire like you are going to start a stage and complete a stage.  Create a routine for yourself.  Especially for when you have completed a stage.  If these become second nature by the time you attend your first match it will be less to process once you are there.  Also treat your dry fire area like a stage, meaning create good safe gun handling skills while dry frying.  Follow all the safety rules, don't break the 180.  Until your "Routines" for making ready and completing a course of fire become common place, say all of the commands.  Do not take short cuts on the commands.  I only did this after attending a couple of matches.  Once I made these things routines, only then did I stop dry firing them.  I always treat me practice area as a range, meaning I do not ever break the 180 and follow all of the rules that would be expected at a match.  Dry Fire, Dry Fire, and more Dry Fire.  Take this time you have where you cannot go to the range to create good habits and good gun handling skills.

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I'm also new to the forum but have been shooting USPSA for about a year. Tips I can give you for your first match. You will be nervous... that is completely fine. If you are unfamiliar with pratiscore that is where most matches are posted. When you show up to the desk to check in its basically the same as IDPA. When you get to your squad just let the RO know that this is your first time shooting USPSA and typically they will walk you through the basics and what to expect. How to read the stage brief. USPSA is a way different game than IDPA. Its all about speed. My recommendation is that you show up to have fun for a while and once you are comfortable start pushing your skill. Good luck and have fun. Let me know if you have any questions.

Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk

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  • 4 weeks later...

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