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3D Printed bullet feeders


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Has anyone purchased them?  Not from Fleabay but from another source, such as Facebook reloading groups, etc?  I have a friend that has purchased a few and he has not had any issues but I questioned their durability plastic vs aluminum built, etc.  They seem to be an alternative for those that don't want to spend $400+ but at $180 cost to $200 is it really worth it?  I have the DAA bulletfeeder on my Mark7 but I also have a Dillon RL1100 thats in need of a bullet feeder but since I won't be using the Dillon as often as the Mark7 I'm not sure wether to spend the money or save the money...  

 

Thoughts? 

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3 hours ago, chgofirefighter said:

Has anyone purchased them?  Not from Fleabay but from another source, such as Facebook reloading groups, etc?  I have a friend that has purchased a few and he has not had any issues but I questioned their durability plastic vs aluminum built, etc.  They seem to be an alternative for those that don't want to spend $400+ but at $180 cost to $200 is it really worth it?  I have the DAA bulletfeeder on my Mark7 but I also have a Dillon RL1100 thats in need of a bullet feeder but since I won't be using the Dillon as often as the Mark7 I'm not sure wether to spend the money or save the money...  

 

Thoughts? 

chgo:

This guy seems to have a solid following over on FaceBook; but I've not dealt with him.........yet........ ;)

 

https://www.facebook.com/groups/609033382832289/

 

 

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Be aware that "Karl Bibb's Reloading" on Facebook will not sell you a bullet feeder that utilizes a ramp to flip bullets who's orientation is not correct, like you are used to on the MBF. This is because DAA came down on him for that when he was selling something similar to AmmoMike83's original design. He now sells an alternative design, which utilizes two bullet drop holes; one that drops bullets in the correct orientation down to your press like a traditional bullet feeder would, and another that drops incorrectly oriented bullets into a tray that you will have to manually put back into the bullet feeder for another go-around.

 

This design that utilizes two holes is available on Thingiverse if you'd like to print your own.


You can still find the original AmmoMike83 ramped bullet feeder design on Thingiverse as well. This is the one I prefer, because it avoids the need to replace the incorrectly oriented bullets back into the feeder. Despite AmmoMike83 getting cease-and-desist'd by DAA and taking down all his .STL's, it's all there on Thingiverse and has been made available by other users who had the .STL's. If you search for "bullet feeder mods", you'll find what you're looking for.

 

As far as durability/longevity goes, that will depend on how optimally setup/tuned the printer was, the material used (PLA vs PETG, etc.), and the amount of fill used.

 

It takes a little less than half a roll of material (rolls are typically 1kg) to print a bullet feeder. A high quality roll of PLA costs $20-$25, and a high quality roll of PETG costs $25-$30. There are two models of motor that people typically choose from, they range from $15 to $40. Popular budget-level printers like the Ender 3 start at $250 and go up from there.

 

I have a Mark 7 Evolution on order and intend on printing my own case and bullet feeders. I never owned a 3D printer and knew nothing about them, but decided this was as good an excuse as any to order one and familiarize myself with 3D printing; I have a feeling its going to come in handy for many other things down the line and be just as rewarding as reloading will be. So, I bought a Prusa i3 MK3S to go along with the Mark 7 and look forward to getting into both hobbies.

 

Once I get my press and 3D printer in, I plan on making a thread detailing my process and lessons learned as far getting everything printed, setup, tuned, etc.

Edited by kamber
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4 hours ago, kamber said:

Be aware that "Karl Bibb's Reloading" on Facebook will not sell you a bullet feeder that utilizes a ramp to flip bullets who's orientation is not correct, like you are used to on the MBF. This is because DAA came down on him for that when he was selling something similar to AmmoMike83's original design. He now sells an alternative design, which utilizes two bullet drop holes; one that drops bullets in the correct orientation down to your press like a traditional bullet feeder would, and another that drops incorrectly oriented bullets into a tray that you will have to manually put back into the bullet feeder for another go-around.

 

This design that utilizes two holes is available on Thingiverse if you'd like to print your own.


You can still find the original AmmoMike83 ramped bullet feeder design on Thingiverse as well. This is the one I prefer, because it avoids the need to replace the incorrectly oriented bullets back into the feeder. Despite AmmoMike83 getting cease-and-desist'd by DAA and taking down all his .STL's, it's all there on Thingiverse and has been made available by other users who had the .STL's. If you search for "bullet feeder mods", you'll find what you're looking for.

 

As far as durability/longevity goes, that will depend on how optimally setup/tuned the printer was, the material used (PLA vs PETG, etc.), and the amount of fill used.

 

It takes a little less than half a roll of material (rolls are typically 1kg) to print a bullet feeder. A high quality roll of PLA costs $20-$25, and a high quality roll of PETG costs $25-$30. There are two models of motor that people typically choose from, they range from $15 to $40. Popular budget-level printers like the Ender 3 start at $250 and go up from there.

 

I have a Mark 7 Evolution on order and intend on printing my own case and bullet feeders. I never owned a 3D printer and knew nothing about them, but decided this was as good an excuse as any to order one and familiarize myself with 3D printing; I have a feeling its going to come in handy for many other things down the line and be just as rewarding as reloading will be. So, I bought a Prusa i3 MK3S to go along with the Mark 7 and look forward to getting into both hobbies.

 

Once I get my press and 3D printer in, I plan on making a thread detailing my process and lessons learned as far getting everything printed, setup, tuned, etc.

kamber:

Thanks for the detailed info on Karl Bibb.  As I've not owned/operated a bullet feeder, I was a bit confused why he was producing a product that had two different drops for the bullets!  Thanks to your info, I now get it!  ;)

 

Also looking forward to your upcoming threads on your new Evo and the associated 3D printed products!

 

👍

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On 4/16/2020 at 3:33 PM, kamber said:

Be aware that "Karl Bibb's Reloading" on Facebook will not sell you a bullet feeder that utilizes a ramp to flip bullets who's orientation is not correct, like you are used to on the MBF. This is because DAA came down on him for that when he was selling something similar to AmmoMike83's original design. He now sells an alternative design, which utilizes two bullet drop holes; one that drops bullets in the correct orientation down to your press like a traditional bullet feeder would, and another that drops incorrectly oriented bullets into a tray that you will have to manually put back into the bullet feeder for another go-around.

 

This design that utilizes two holes is available on Thingiverse if you'd like to print your own.


You can still find the original AmmoMike83 ramped bullet feeder design on Thingiverse as well. This is the one I prefer, because it avoids the need to replace the incorrectly oriented bullets back into the feeder. Despite AmmoMike83 getting cease-and-desist'd by DAA and taking down all his .STL's, it's all there on Thingiverse and has been made available by other users who had the .STL's. If you search for "bullet feeder mods", you'll find what you're looking for.

 

As far as durability/longevity goes, that will depend on how optimally setup/tuned the printer was, the material used (PLA vs PETG, etc.), and the amount of fill used.

 

It takes a little less than half a roll of material (rolls are typically 1kg) to print a bullet feeder. A high quality roll of PLA costs $20-$25, and a high quality roll of PETG costs $25-$30. There are two models of motor that people typically choose from, they range from $15 to $40. Popular budget-level printers like the Ender 3 start at $250 and go up from there.

 

I have a Mark 7 Evolution on order and intend on printing my own case and bullet feeders. I never owned a 3D printer and knew nothing about them, but decided this was as good an excuse as any to order one and familiarize myself with 3D printing; I have a feeling its going to come in handy for many other things down the line and be just as rewarding as reloading will be. So, I bought a Prusa i3 MK3S to go along with the Mark 7 and look forward to getting into both hobbies.

 

Once I get my press and 3D printer in, I plan on making a thread detailing my process and lessons learned as far getting everything printed, setup, tuned, etc.

 

 

Thanks, I contacted Karl and he's charging $180 plus $20 for his bullet feeder and it's a lot cheaper than a DAA like $200+ cheaper my Mark 7 has a bullet feeder by DAA but my RL1100 doesn't and I'm not sure if I want to spend another $469+ on a bullet feeder or save the money and get Karl's. Lastly, IMO saving $200 doesn't seem like much of a saving since I don't know how long a 3D printed bullet feeder will work or last, so I'm not 100% sure if the $200 gamble is even worth it at this point.  But I will do some further research and this topic...  but I'm almost leaning towards the DAA and be done!  

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On 4/16/2020 at 4:33 PM, kamber said:

He now sells an alternative design, which utilizes two bullet drop holes; one that drops bullets in the correct orientation down to your press like a traditional bullet feeder would, and another that drops incorrectly oriented bullets into a tray that you will have to manually put back into the bullet feeder for another go-around.

chgo:

While $200 is a substantial savings, I'm just wondering if the aggravation of dealing with "two" bullet drop holes is worth it?

 

🤔

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In the long run, NO, the $200 savings is not worth it.  For whatever reason, should you ever decide to sell the MBF, it's resale value will be at worst 50% of the purchase price, the no-name 3D will be worth 5%.  You do the math.

 

Oh, yeah, 2 holers went out of style when indoor plumbing became common.

 

2 holers refers to outdoor toilets (out houses) with 2 toilet holes.

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If karl bibs still had the ramp I would buy a bullet feeder from him for every caliper I load so I don’t have to convert my DAA. Every time 
I was even thinking about buying from him And making my own ramp 🤔 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Kamber:

Thanks for your posts. Look forward to reading more of your posts as you go along. I am interested in doing the same thing. Buying a 3D printer and also a Mark 7 Evo without the case feeder or bullet feeder and making my own


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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Anyone have link to the original KB/Ammo Mike 3D files? I’m going to sizing a lot of bullets on a Lee APP and need a feeder to go nose down. It’s close enough to my 650 where I may also run it for seating pistol bullets, not a 100% though as I like to have a power check. 
 

does the orig kb/Ammo Mike design allow for nose down and nose up depending on need? 

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10 hours ago, IrishPsych said:

Anyone have link to the original KB/Ammo Mike 3D files? I’m going to sizing a lot of bullets on a Lee APP and need a feeder to go nose down. It’s close enough to my 650 where I may also run it for seating pistol bullets, not a 100% though as I like to have a power check. 
 

does the orig kb/Ammo Mike design allow for nose down and nose up depending on need? 

PM sent

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  • 5 months later...
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I've been 3d printing for about 2 years now.  There is a bit of a learning curve at first, but imho, anyone who can navigate online forums, post pics, AND who can also assemble and keep a progressive press running can 3d print.

 

I use an Ender Pro.  Purchased from amazon for $208 on sale in Jan, 2019 while recovering from a broken ankle.  For the first month, I only printed knick knacks and accessories for the printer itself, getting the hang of it.

 

For the next year or so, I printed a few hundred handgun wall mounts like this:  80864F98-A7D7-49AD-8429-A53F8A044FD7_1_105_c.thumb.jpeg.b4a3052832810819cdc0de9762761632.jpeg

939E49E2-A1AC-4D83-9E1A-23D6CE3937B6_1_105_c.thumb.jpeg.692bc6ceb13f0f289a62a569f4a878fa.jpeg

 

I set out to make what started as a 200% sized version (I want to be able to dump in at least 300 bullets, or about 7 minutes worth, minimum, at a time) but morphed into a 272% sized version.... and eventually dropped it all and bought a Mr. Bulletfeeder Pro.

 

I've easily spent upwards of 200 hours working on some of the bulletfeeder files, and my printer worked for at least a few hundred hours doing prints for it, and although I've gotten pretty good w/Fusion 360, and manipulating dimensions and experimenting with different PLA and PETG (types of filament).  My bottom line--for me only-- is that although I print a lot of other stuff, I won't be trying to make a 3d printed bullet or case feeder work...  

 

It feels like I'm about to type the backstory to a Luke Combs or George Jones song:

 

PLA breaks down (due to heat, time, and UV exposure, and maybe some other stuff I don't know about.  I live in Texas, and experimenting with my original handgun wall mounts led me to printing in carbon fiber reinforced PETG, because you can leave it in the back of a Ford Expedition in the Texas heat, in August, for a few weeks, and it will neither melt, nor droop/run, whereas 'regular' PLA will.

 

ANYway...at the point that I realized I'd sunk 2 long week's worth of work into it, and still didn't have even a moderately successful Beta, I threw in the towel.  

 

I'm not saying don't do it:  I'm simply saying go with the existing files and you'll likely have a much easier, and successful, experience than I did.  Good luck!  (and don't try and drastically modify the bulletfeeder...lol)

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20 hours ago, JDIllon said:

I have been using a 3D printed bullet feeder for years on my 1050 Dillon setup for 9mm. Total cost about $200.00

P1010307.JPG

181015_045937_4.jpeg

What spring is that in the lower right. I’ve had a hell of a time finding one that fits mine properly 

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