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Headstamps Question


nhglyn
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I bought a large batch of 9mm range brass and have found a number with the headstamps in the photos.  They decap but the primer hole is slightly small will not accept a new primer and I end up throwing them away.  Can anyone identify for me?  Why primer hole too small?  Reloading on Dillon 550C so no swaging station.  Thanks.

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5 minutes ago, Sarge said:

Those are excellent pictures of military crimped primer pockets. You can trash them or get a pocket reamer 

Thanks, sort of what  I figured.  Do you know why the military does this?  Why different than "store bought"?

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Thanks, sort of what  I figured.  Do you know why the military does this?  Why different than "store bought"?
From what I've read, the primer is crimped to ensure a spent primer doesn't get ejected from the case. An ejected primer could cause a malfunction if it were to interfere with the action of the firearm.


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From what I've read, the primer is crimped to ensure a spent primer doesn't get ejected from the case. An ejected primer could cause a malfunction if it were to interfere with the action of the firearm.


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Never heard that one before, but I have heard it’s for making sure the primer is 100% sealed so no moisture gets into the ammo and cases a FTF. If you’re just starting out and don’t want to invest the $100-$130 or so for a dillon swager you can use a chamfer tool sometimes, or even a larger sized drill bit. The drill bit doesn’t work all that well, but if you have one in your garage and don’t have to go buy one it could save you the trouble of throwing them out. There are also tools that you can put into a drill specifically designed to remove crimps that cost about $15 or so like this one: RCBS 90386 TM Military Crimp Remover, 2 Small https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0063IDE6A/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_L-UCEb2628AX1

If you’re going to load 223 as well it could be worth investing in a tool to make your life easier. If you’re just going to be doing the handful you have or will pick up a chamfer tool or drill bit will probably get you by. You don’t need to remove a ton of material and can do too much. You just want to remove the smaller ring next to the primer pocket. Do a little and see if you can easily seat a primer. If you can’t, remove a little more material and try again. Good luck


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I wouldn’t think crimping makes rounds waterproof? Sealing the does

Not entirely sure Sarge, that’s just what I had heard a while ago. Could be wrong though. While I think a sealant may work better it would still help, you’re shoving more material tighter to the primer to help keep water out? Might help more if it was under pressure, like dropping ammo in a couple foot deep water? Not exactly sure haha


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2 hours ago, looking4reloadingdeals said:


Not entirely sure Sarge, that’s just what I had heard a while ago. Could be wrong though. While I think a sealant may work better it would still help, you’re shoving more material tighter to the primer to help keep water out? Might help more if it was under pressure, like dropping ammo in a couple foot deep water? Not exactly sure haha


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Yeah not sure either. Just remember military ammo having green spooge around primers 

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My understanding of the "crimp" primers is strictly for reliability, especially with automatic weapons. One does not want the primer to fall out in the heat of real life battle.

My military 30-06 has 3 or 4 crimped tabs and both 9mm and 5.56 has the whole primer circled as in the above pictures.

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On 3/18/2020 at 12:47 PM, nhglyn said:

Thanks, sort of what  I figured.  Do you know why the military does this?  Why different than "store bought"?

 

I believe the military does this as an extra measure to help prevent primers from popping out and possibly causing malfunctions if pressures get too high.

You can absolutely ream, swage, or otherwise remove the crimp on brass like that, but 9mm brass is so common that I typically throw crimped brass into the recycle pile. I will remove crimps on rifle brass though.

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Crimped primer pockets and really tight ones in foreign brass were the reasons I upgraded to a 1050 when I exclusively load 9mm.

 

Superior depriming, swaging, and a user-adjustable priming system? That was it. No matter the brass, I consistently have CCI primers seated .007-.009” below flush and they run flawlessly in hammer fired guns. I had all kinds of headaches with Tanfoglios with light springs with my 650. Now I barely bother to inspect primers when case gauging my ammo. They’re always perfectly seated. 

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