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headrec

Newb looking into competitive shooting

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Hey went shooting recently with my new ar15 a couple of months ago and have been debating getting into 3 gun or whatever competitive shooting that makes sense for my equipment.

I have a pretty cheap but solid bastard AR15.  Nothing special but put about 1000 rounds through it with 0 malfunctions.  Just added a viper 1-6 pst gen 2 scope to it to reach out a bit.
I'm picking up a Mossberg 940 JM Pro from my FFL tomorrow.

Where I feel I could utilize my money a bit, is in the pistol category.

Currently have a PPQ M2 4 inch pistol. And I've noticed it does have quite a bit of recoil.  With needing to get a belt and holster set going to really move forward with finishing off everything for 3 gun, I feel part of me wants to just run the PPQ but if I'm going to start buying accessories I might as well get a starter gun before I start buying accessories like a holster or extra magazines/extension/etc.

I've looked at everything from a Glock 34 and several polymer guns to a 2011.  

Seems like the Glock 34 is kind of the go to when people want the Honda Civics of a starter gun.  The 2011 look and sound great but also expensive.  I've debated getting the PPQ Q5 Match to be familiar with the platform.

Basically looking at a starter pistol I can grow with (aka maybe upgrades to help the jump to an expensive platform like the 2011). CZ seem like another good option.

I've got some money to play around with but trying to make the best bang for the buck.  

I realize more ammo would probably be the best bet but trying to start off but I could be spending that time with a good platform learning and wondering if I should spend a bit before throwing a holster on my PPQ and get a Glock/CZ/etc.

 

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I'd stick with what you have for a while - the pistol is fine - not the best, as

you said, but more than adequate.  Pistol shooting is usually the least

important in 3-gun (IMHO) - usually a plate rack at the end.

 

Save your money and use what you've got.

 

You don't say where you're from, or how much experience you have,

but I'd suggest getting a private lesson from a local GM - great

way to learn a LOT FAST.     :) 

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Go with what you have for the time being. Put your time and money into a combination of dry fire practice and range time, especially mid to long range rifle. Rifle and shotgun loading seem to separate the good shooters  from the average shooters. Watch Utube videos for help but don't believe everything you see. Good luck, have fun.

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If you are happy with your current pistol, I would say stick with it and have some fun. If you are wanting something different, can’t go wrong with a Glock 34, CZ Shadow 2, Tanfoglio Stock 2, Sig P320 X5/Legion, and the list goes on. Most all of the people you meet at the match will be happy to let you try out their gun after the match. It would be a great place to figure out exactly what you like before you purchase something.

 

If I was starting out, getting some reloading equipment so you can start reloading is a great way to save money on ammo and allows you shoot more for less. Taking a class and getting some books/training material would also be a great use of your time and money. 

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9 hours ago, Hi-Power Jack said:

You don't say where you're from, or how much experience you have,

but I'd suggest getting a private lesson from a local GM - great

way to learn a LOT FAST.     :) 

I'm in northern Utah and little to none.

Good call.  I've been practicing dry firing and picked up some dummy shells to practice shotgun loading...that's going to need some serious I can tell already.
 

5 hours ago, orangeman711 said:

Go with what you have for the time being. Put your time and money into a combination of dry fire practice and range time, especially mid to long range rifle. Rifle and shotgun loading seem to separate the good shooters  from the average shooters. Watch Utube videos for help but don't believe everything you see. Good luck, have fun.

 

Thanks and noted.

 

4 hours ago, ngodwetrust21 said:

If you are happy with your current pistol, I would say stick with it and have some fun. If you are wanting something different, can’t go wrong with a Glock 34, CZ Shadow 2, Tanfoglio Stock 2, Sig P320 X5/Legion, and the list goes on. Most all of the people you meet at the match will be happy to let you try out their gun after the match. It would be a great place to figure out exactly what you like before you purchase something.

 

If I was starting out, getting some reloading equipment so you can start reloading is a great way to save money on ammo and allows you shoot more for less. Taking a class and getting some books/training material would also be a great use of your time and money. 

 

I like it except for the excessive muzzle flip.   Thanks for the suggestions of guns to check out.

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enough talk. sign up in practiscore. find an uspsa match and go shoot.  it is a very social game and the shooters are generally very helpful... so just jump in.

 

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10 hours ago, headrec said:

 

I like it except for the excessive muzzle flip.   

 

Muzzle flip can be lessened by :

 

1.  lighter springs in your gun

2.  ammunition change - heavier bullets and lower PF's

3.  your grip (very strong with the weak hand).

4.  add weight to the gun (if permitted), eg heavy mag well, etc

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I suggest taking your PPQ to some USPSA (IDPA, ASI, GADPA, UPL, local outlaw) PISTOL matches and get acquainted with the action shooting environment before trying to learn to manage three guns at once. 

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6 hours ago, Jim Watson said:

I suggest taking your PPQ to some USPSA (IDPA, ASI, GADPA, UPL, local outlaw) PISTOL matches and get acquainted with the action shooting environment before trying to learn to manage three guns at once. 

 

^^^^^^^   True dat     ^^^^^^^^^^^

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8 hours ago, Jim Watson said:

I suggest taking your PPQ to some USPSA (IDPA, ASI, GADPA, UPL, local outlaw) PISTOL matches and get acquainted with the action shooting environment before trying to learn to manage three guns at once. 

Noted.  Thanks for all the advice everyone.

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Forgive me for the dumb question, being a newb as well, but can people go watch matches that aren't shooting in them? I would like to dip my toes in the water so to speak, and just see how everything works until im ready to jump in.

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5 minutes ago, BradH said:

Forgive me for the dumb question, being a newb as well, but can people go watch matches that aren't shooting in them? I would like to dip my toes in the water so to speak, and just see how everything works until im ready to jump in.

You can go watch a match.  They are open to the public.  Just bring eye and ear protection.  Stand at the back of the squad shooting and don't touch anything on the stage you are watching.  Someone will eventually notice you and offer to answer questions about what is going on.  Very sociable sport with some really good people.

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14 minutes ago, aandabooks said:

You can go watch a match.  They are open to the public.  Just bring eye and ear protection.  Stand at the back of the squad shooting and don't touch anything on the stage you are watching.  Someone will eventually notice you and offer to answer questions about what is going on.  Very sociable sport with some really good people.

Thanks man, i appreciate the advice. I would have felt really stupid showing up without ears ha, so one mistake saved.

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If you decide to jump in with both feet, tell'em you've never shot competition.  They will try to hook you up with a squad that will help you.  Info / nerve overload is common, shoot within your skills.  Your job is to shoot safely, accurately and not admire your hits.  Breath, very easy to forget this important function (I'm guilty).  Watch, listen, ask, help, the more you learn the better you become.  Be an asset to the shooting community, help your local club fix, score or setup / tear down at the match.  Don't be a bench warmer.

 

I was "adopted" by Dennis Cruz, can't thank him enough for what he taught / shared.  I've done free or have shown how do trigger jobs, ran the club practice days (Shooting Sports Alliance) helped teach beginner / intermediate IPSC classes and attended NROI classes.

 

We all started out just like you're doing now.

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