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Talk me out of a 750


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Evolution + bulletfeeder $3500

RL1100 + bulletfeeder $2400

750 + casefeeder + bulletfeeder $1500

 

Whichever one I buy, it will shortly get a Mark7 autodrive so add another two grand.

 

Yeah the two big boys have swaging, more stations and make ammo with less runout, but is it really worth all the extra dosh? Not to mention the much higher cost of caliber conversions. I'm not making so much ammo that I HAVE to automate, but I'm getting older and decades of pulling the handle is quite enough. And I don't HAVE to have swaging, it'd be nice, sure, but wow that extra cost. Don't get me wrong, I can afford the better machines, but the extra up front cost and higher conversion costs just seem a bit much for what I'm doing. An extra $200+ per conversion? Ouch.

 

Right now my plan is to get the 750 with bullet and case feeders, try it out and see if it's a champ, then automate. If it's not a champ, dump it and get the 1100. The only real issue I see with the 750 is not being able to powder check with a bulletfeeder. But I may be able to use a different powder measure to get the room needed to do so so we'll see.

 

If it helps, I'm currently loading 9 Major, 45acp large primer, 223 and 300 blk. Yeah, I'll have to two-pass the rifle ammo but with automation it's no biggie.

 

I've been fighting with myself for months over this and waiting for the user reports on the new machines to settle out. Right now I pretty much need someone to give me a good reason not to cheap out and just get the 750. Will it hold up to automation? Will it need constant fiddling? Or maybe I'm missing some other big issue besides simply wanting the coolest machine.

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My opinion, it is all about volume. How many thousands of each caliber do you intend to load a year. I have a 650 and a 1050 (no automation yet), and I'm still loading all my 9mm on my 650. With the bullet feeder and the primer filler, I can load a pretty decent amount of ammo. I also load 223/300 blk, and the 1050 is nice for swaging, but unless I was loading 10k plus a year, I would probably be happy with the 650 for rifle ammo too

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-Everything I have read over the years has been dont automate a 650/750.

-Initial cost difference between a fully loaded 750 and an 1100 are not that great. Y

-I would say if your willing to spend  on the autodrive almost immediately go 1100

-I have a 650 and it meets my needs fine But I want an 1100  and if I were to sell my 650 to upgrade Id be out even more than the initial difference

 

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I have a 650 decked out with case feeder and Mr Bullet feeder. I have about 10 of each primer tube that I fill with a vibra prime. I have tool heads for every caliber. Change overs are quick. It makes ammo as fast as I can pull the handle. I use my 550 for load work ups and precision rifle stuff. The bullet feeder makes all the difference.

 

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I load all my high volume pistol stuff and high volume 223/300 BLK on the 650 as well. I have several tool heads dedicated to 223/300 BLK case creation and prep. When making/preping 300BLK/223 cases I use the Armanov swager pro.

 

https://armanov.com/eu-shop/armanov-products/swager-pro-for-dillon-xl650/

 

 

I think I have to agree if you’re gonna automate the 1100 is the way to go.

 

For me the the deal breaker wasn’t so much cost of the 1050/1100, but complexity of caliber changes (and I guess cost a little bit), and space.

 

If I was gonna do a 1050/1100 it would be a dedicated machine due to the stated complexity (and cost) of caliber changes. And I just don’t have the space to have multiple dedicated 1050/1100’s, a 650, and a 550.

 

For 223/300 BLK the 1050/1100 is the way to go, but I had to compromise somewhere.

 

 

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Pulling the handle on a 1050 requires around half the force that it did on my 650, which will be identical to a 750.

 

That’s huge if you load 1,000 rounds sessions like I do at age 40, or if you have arthritis and want to load lower volumes.

 

Additionally, the 650/750 design is going to break parts many times more frequently if automated, and without swaging you better have some high quality brass to feed it. The beefiness of my 1050s design and build when compared to the 650 I had for 10 years really can’t be overstated.

 

Edited by MemphisMechanic
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As others have alluded to, I think the question for you may come down to what kind of brass you intend to feed the machine.  If you're talking pick it up out of the mud, clean it and start the reloading process, then either the 1100 or Evolution will be a better option.  If you have a bunch of already semi-processed brass, buy it from a reputable source, etc., then the 750 should probably serve you fine.  I would second or third or whatever, that while neither the 750 nor the 1050/1100 was truly designed to be automated, the 1050/1100 will handle it a whole heck of a lot better.  Best of luck!

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Initial cost difference of the machines isn't a huge amount but the cost of three or four additional quick change kits really adds up on a 1100, now the difference isn't $900, it's darned near two grand. But if the 750 isn't the best thing to automate due to fiddling, finicky-ness and breakage then I guess I'll have to suck it up and save myself the headache of buying, disliking and then selling the 750. Buy once, cry once I suppose. Then cry some more every time I need another caliber, and curse every time I need to change over. Well, at least I won't have to two-pass the rifle brass.

 

Anybody have an in at a place selling Dillon gear? Or some good dirt I can use?

 

Hey Dillon! How about a reverse sponsorship? When anyone asks how I got so bad at shooting, I won't mention that I use your excellent equipment.

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Look at getting an Anmobot if you are thinking about automating an RL 1100. Ammobot has a machine specifically designed for the RL 1100.

Their machines work well, they have a ton of features, customer service is great, and it's less expensive than the Mark 7 1050 autodrive.

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On 2/9/2020 at 8:11 PM, Absocold said:

If it helps, I'm currently loading 9 Major, 45acp large primer, 223 and 300 blk. Yeah, I'll have to two-pass the rifle ammo but with automation it's no biggie.

 

What are you loading with now?

 

I would personally get the 1100 or Evo and set it up for whatever you're loading the most of now and keep doing what you're doing for the rest. Then over time, you can always add conversions later.

 

I just picked up a 550 and plan on getting an 1100 later on. Saw the 650/750 as a compromise between the two and would rather just end up jumping up to the 1100. The 550 is for anything I'm not shooting a lot of as well as developing loads.

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Had a 1050 but the guy that bought my last house was also a shooter and threw in extra cash for me to leave it and the bench. I loaded everything I could before the move so was flush with ammo for a good long while. All I have at the moment is a Lee Reloader I use for sizing cast bullets and a Lee Loadmaster for de-priming filthy brass and making quick handfuls of ammo. The Loadmaster is a giant steaming pile but it works (with *constant* fiddling) and caliber changes are stupidly fast, easy and cheap.

 

I know, I know. Going from a 1050 down to a 750 would make me question my life choices and sanity but I was hoping I could get away with it. Guess not. RL1100 here I come.

 

 

PS. WTF THEY'RE ON 4-6 WEEK BACKORDER?! *&%$ @&#*!!!!

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Consider one thing - In 12 to 24 months from now are you gonna look back and ask yourself - Why did I not buy the 1100?  If this is even a possibility then go with the 1100...I am 60 now and I am blessed and fortunate to have a great job, wonderful wife, and my health...I have a 650 on my bench now and a 1100 in route....Do I shoot enough now to justify the 1100.....Nope.....But I bought it because when I retire I plan on shooting a lot more than I do now and wanted to have the 1100 to help this old man reload in the easiest manner possible....

 

Also - being that the 1100 is the latest commercial model your purchase of an 1100 is really an investment...I have yet to read where anyone lost money on the selling of their Dillon press if they kept their press in great working condition and held on to it for some period of time.....My plan is when I get to the point where I cannot safely reload (mind or body) I can give one Dillon press to each of my two sons for their use and enjoyment.....Just my 2 cents worth.....

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On 2/10/2020 at 12:37 PM, MemphisMechanic said:

Pulling the handle on a 1050 requires around half the force that it did on my 650, which will be identical to a 750.

 

That’s huge if you load 1,000 rounds sessions like I do at age 40, or if you have arthritis and want to load lower volumes.

 

Additionally, the 650/750 design is going to break parts many times more frequently if automated, and without swaging you better have some high quality brass to feed it. The beefiness of my 1050s design and build when compared to the 650 I had for 10 years really can’t be overstated.

 

Why does the 1050 require half the force of a 650?

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5 hours ago, Tampa-XD45 said:

Why does the 1050 require half the force of a 650?


650 primes at one end of stroke, everything else at the other.

 

The 1050 does everything at one end. Dillon was able to create a linkage with a ton of leverage at one end, and much less at the other. This is partially why the 1050 toolhead has a return spring to help lift it up.

 

I wasn’t aware of this, and it was a huge fringe benefit when I first switched from 650 to 1050.

 

The other unknown awesome surprise is primers don’t get ejected if they’re unused because you cleared a jam. The machine will keep offering the same one until a case arrives to take it. 👍
 

Edited by MemphisMechanic
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On 2/10/2020 at 10:47 AM, cjmill87 said:

As others have alluded to, I think the question for you may come down to what kind of brass you intend to feed the machine.  If you're talking pick it up out of the mud, clean it and start the reloading process, then either the 1100 or Evolution will be a better option.  If you have a bunch of already semi-processed brass, buy it from a reputable source, etc., then the 750 should probably serve you fine.  I would second or third or whatever, that while neither the 750 nor the 1050/1100 was truly designed to be automated, the 1050/1100 will handle it a whole heck of a lot better.  Best of luck!

 

Although the 1050 was probably not designed to be automated and I'm guessing that Dillon would probably not admit that the 1100 was... if you read between the lines on a number of Dillon oriented and/or Ammobot forums you could guess that they know damn well that the 1100 is going to be automated and some of the design differences between it and the 1050 are a result of that realization.

 

Additionally... while developing/debugging the 1100 Dillon had at least one Ammobot on site and used it to put a developmental 1100 through several million cycles.

 

I think it would be safe to say that an 1100 and automation will go together very well whether you choose Ammobot or Mark 7.  My Ammobot experience has been quite positive.

 

 

Edited by ddc
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