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how hard a grip

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Yep, agree with everything said. Strong grip, front to back, side to side. Here's one that baffled me. I know a GM Open Shooter that is really good and squaded with him one day. I asked him about grip, he said he uses a "Soft Grip". What? 🤔

 

Took my video of him and slowed it down. Watching his gun from the side, on the first shot the comp goes up and just as it came back down, you could see it settle just ever so slightly and pause back to where it started. He then fired his second shot. His splits are in the teens too (.17, .18, etc...) Yep I know, it's mechanics and science 🚀

 

He shoots 124gr with Silhouette. I really think part of this control is part mechanics and knowing your gun. I don't know what kind of grip that is, but it sure has worked for him. He was truly one with his gear, no doubt.

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On 2/15/2020 at 3:09 PM, Dranoel said:

 

Don't "try it".  UNDERSTAND it. 

I have friends that I shoot with that ask me, "How do you do that?" I answer them with a movie quote from Harley Davidson and the Marlboro Man:  "I read a book.  Came with the gun."

 

For me, it was true. the day I bought my first 1911 was the day I received in the mail a book I had ordered a couple weeks before. ( this was before the innerwebs and online bookstores)"Practical Shooting: Beyond Fundamentals" by Brian Enos

I read it. Then read it again. Then read it trying to "picture" what he was saying. Then I went to the range and actually PRACTICED what he said.

 

HOLY MOTHER OF JESUS!!!!    You cannot BELIEVE how much it changed my shooting and how much it changed the way I LOOKED and SAW my shooting. From there it changed the way I looked at and saw EVERYTHING. 

 

To simplify his book I would say, " Stop complicating things and SEE what you are doing. Keep your grip simple and neutral. I have teached and preached this for more than 20 yrs. But just as important, OBSERVE what happens when you fire, move, etc and UNDERSTAND what is happening so that later you can examine it and improve.

 

 

There is SO much truth here

 

But if most shooters did what you did, the tacticool trainer world would be very sad.......

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I took a class with Chris Tilley a couple weeks ago and the very first thing he noticed was that my grip strength was inadequate. He uses the push/pull method but a strong grip is essential. After a few drills and some practice I could see the results with fine group shooting and fast follow ups etc. It works. It is also fatiguing for me and will require work and dry fire.

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7 hours ago, Posvar said:

I took a class with Chris Tilley a couple weeks ago and the very first thing he noticed was that my grip strength was inadequate. He uses the push/pull method but a strong grip is essential. After a few drills and some practice I could see the results with fine group shooting and fast follow ups etc. It works. It is also fatiguing for me and will require work and dry fire.

 
Does he recommend gripping hard with both hands while push/pulling? He seems to shoot really flat with his recoil.

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On 3/9/2020 at 6:15 PM, Lastcat said:

 Here's one that baffled me. I know a GM Open Shooter that is really good and squaded with him one day. I asked him about grip, he said he uses a "Soft Grip". What? 🤔

 

Took my video of him and slowed it down. Watching his gun from the side, on the first shot the comp goes up and just as it came back down, you could see it settle just ever so slightly and pause back to where it started. He then fired his second shot. His splits are in the teens too (.17, .18, etc...) Yep I know, it's mechanics and science 🚀

 

He shoots 124gr with Silhouette. I really think part of this control is part mechanics and knowing your gun. I don't know what kind of grip that is, but it sure has worked for him. He was truly one with his gear, no doubt.

Open guns manage recoil mechanically, much less for the shooter to do. 

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, Posvar said:

... I could see the results with fine group shooting and fast follow ups etc. It works. It is also fatiguing for me and will require work and dry fire.


The thing about gripping hard during a match is that it doesn’t require THAT much endurance: Even a long field course is perhaps 20-30 seconds total, half of which is “relax the grip while moving, loading, etc.” So you squeeze for five seconds here, run over there, and repeat.

 

The trick to gripping hard is... that you have learn do it via dryfire. It has to be instinctive to crush down on the gun as the slide comes up into your vision and you prep for the first shot, and stay forearm-burningly tight until you break the gun down and move to the next positions.


Which means when you’re dryfiring... it will wear you out heavily at first. Which is a good thing: it’s uncomfortable, but all exercises which build strength are. Before long you’ll find it completely sustainable.

 

Always make sure to grip the gun as hard as you should when dryfiring: I am the poster child for building bad habits with dryfire back in the B-class days. Chief among them were a relaxed grip since I knew the gun wasn’t going to go off, and transitioning the gun to an imprecise spot on the targets just to stay ahead of the par time.

 

Edited by MemphisMechanic

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On 3/24/2020 at 3:37 PM, JohnS23 said:

 
Does he recommend gripping hard with both hands while push/pulling? He seems to shoot really flat with his recoil.

Yes 

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On 3/24/2020 at 5:10 PM, MemphisMechanic said:


The thing about gripping hard during a match is that it doesn’t require THAT much endurance: Even a long field course is perhaps 20-30 seconds total, half of which is “relax the grip while moving, loading, etc.” So you squeeze for five seconds here, run over there, and repeat.

 

The trick to gripping hard is... that you have learn do it via dryfire. It has to be instinctive to crush down on the gun as the slide comes up into your vision and you prep for the first shot, and stay forearm-burningly tight until you break the gun down and move to the next positions.


Which means when you’re dryfiring... it will wear you out heavily at first. Which is a good thing: it’s uncomfortable, but all exercises which build strength are. Before long you’ll find it completely sustainable.

 

Always make sure to grip the gun as hard as you should when dryfiring: I am the poster child for building bad habits with dryfire back in the B-class days. Chief among them were a relaxed grip since I knew the gun wasn’t going to go off, and transitioning the gun to an imprecise spot on the targets just to stay ahead of the par time.

 

Excellent advice. Thanks 

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