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Fixing galling on 2011 rails


Benevolence
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Wondering what the best route I should do for this. The gun has been a project gun I’ve been building from oversized parts. I have access to mill, lathe, and welding equipment (mig, tig, laser, etc.). Long story short, I galled it a bit when lapping the frame-slide together but got it to work (some galling damage remained). I had a buddy PVD coat it with CrN but I believe the temperatures distorted it, along with the hard CrN perhaps cracking and regalling it. I’m planning on milling (with fresh 3/32” carbide endmill) in the rail to just touch it up but I’m a bit concerned of making it sloppy loose. I could also tig/mig it to build the rails up and remill them to size but I’m worried about cracking or distorting the rest of the frame. Any advice?

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Depends on the original cuts and where its messed up, Almost thinking its a side load or non parallel issue.  Just being tight shouldnt cause galling. They are all tight at first. Take off the high spots, good possibility  it will do it again. You may end up having to accurail it

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If the fit is reasonably tight and the galling is just cosmetic, I'd leave it as is and not worry about it.  If the fit is poor, you'll need to remove any coating/finsh and get down to bare metal before you can do any welding.  Then the best thing would be to TiG weld (that's the best process for controlling the heat) and remachine the rails.  Alternatively, you can go the Accu-Rail route.  But be aware that when you do the Accu-Rail, they cut the frame and slide substantially as part of the process, so you can't run the gun without the rails after it's done.  Never understood why they do that, but it's one reason I'm not too hot on the process.

Edited by ltdmstr
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I think the original galling that I caused was forcing the two together without having ground off enough material from the bottom of the slide when I was performing the lapping step. It galled at the top face of the frame (under the rails) and on the lowermost underside of the slide. I fixed it but combining the remnants of that damage and the heat distortion caused it to resurface I believe. Totally accept the s#!tty assembly, may have to spend $500 for a new frame/slide to restart but I’ll try taking just a few thousands of an inch off and see if it cleans up the damage without making it a tambourine. 

 

Thanks all for the input.

Edited by Benevolence
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2 hours ago, Benevolence said:

I think the original galling that I caused was forcing the two together without having ground off enough material from the bottom of the slide when I was performing the lapping step. It galled at the top face of the frame (under the rails) and on the lowermost underside of the slide. I fixed it but combining the remnants of that damage and the heat distortion caused it to resurface I believe. Totally accept the s#!tty assembly, may have to spend $500 for a new frame/slide to restart but I’ll try taking just a few thousands of an inch off and see if it cleans up the damage without making it a tambourine. 

 

Thanks all for the input.

 

can u post few pic. of this?

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8 hours ago, yigal said:

 

can u post few pic. of this?

Sure, attached. The lighting and shadows make it look a lot deeper than it is; I’d guess it’s about 0.005” deep at most, and less than that for the majority of it. Which isn’t great all though. I’ll post pictures after I touch it up with the mill

03A956F9-BD17-40C1-862A-C746C17A940D.jpeg

96B3F477-FB92-4E67-99DF-2BC91A2141BD.jpeg

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Stone off the high spots so the slide runs smooth.  Don't worry about appearance and divots.  They help retain gun oil.  A perfectly smooth as glass bearing surface is NOT the most desirable.  Go over to practical machinist forum and search for "scraping".  Try to avoid the lapping compound approach as it will remove material where you don't want to remove it.

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Thanks all. I think I’ll get that for my next build when I eventually do a 9mm Major. 

 

I did some touch up with the mill and only took a few thou off at most. There is one last ‘sticking point’ that I’m trying to determine how far back the slide really needs to be able to go and where the remaining high spots are. Lesson learned; the temperatures for PVD coatings are enough to distort a tight fit frame-slide and require re-fitting

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  • 9 months later...

 Goodmorning,I just purchaseda Colt 80 series Mark IV.IT  has upper slide rail damage .After reading up on this gun correct me if imwrong but the lower slide assembly is made of a different steel than the upper part. shoots fine and  i am leaving the damage alone and plan to use the distortion as a tool to distribute oilbetween the slides.it seems to work on the ways of lathes.

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