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Removing Case Lube


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Pistol or rifle?

For pistol Hornady One Shot is great. Doesn’t take much and doesn’t need to be removed after loading.

I use homemade lanolin lube for rifle which I either tumble off as described above or wet tumble with stainless depending on what I’m loading for and how much processing I’m in the mood for.


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I mostly don't bother removing lube after loading pistol ammo. I don't put a lot on there in the first place, and it doesn't hurt anything to leave it.

 

When I do remove lube from loaded ammo, I just tumble it in corn cob. If I'm removing lube from empty sized brass, sometimes I'll just rinse it in laquer thinner or acetone; that dries fast and is quicker than tumbling. If I'm really in a hurry sometimes I'll drain the laquer thinner and then light what remains on the brass; the residue burns up in a minute or so and doesn't heat up the cases enough to be a problem. That might sound crazy, but I'm working in a concrete-floored shop and the brass is in a metal pan so it's pretty harmless. 

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After reading some suggestions here, I started using Hornady One shot lube. It really helps a lot and just a little will go a long way. It really makes a huge difference and does not need to be removed.


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After reading some suggestions here, I started using Hornady One shot lube. It really helps a lot and just a little will go a long way. It really makes a huge difference and does not need to be removed.


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[emoji1319]

It really is the way to go. Glad to see another convert.

It smooths out the loading process SO much and since it doesn’t need to be removed....not sure why anyone would use lanolin lube on pistol cases at this point?


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7 hours ago, iflyskyhigh said:

 

..not sure why anyone would use lanolin lube on pistol cases at this point?
 

 

 

No reason not to. Lanolin based lubes work well, and as long as you're not using too much, they don't need to be removed either. 

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I used one shot for years then the corn cob clean. I had no issues with it except the cost and shipping hassle. Then someone asked me if I saw the article regarding problems with power after running a cleaning cycle. I never had a problem I knew of the but the thought was planted.

Then I tried dry lube. Works great and cheaper than one shot. No need to clean anything.  I load 9x25 and they don't work well even in carbide dies without lube.

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I used one shot for years then the corn cob clean. I had no issues with it except the cost and shipping hassle. Then someone asked me if I saw the article regarding problems with power after running a cleaning cycle. I never had a problem I knew of the but the thought was planted.
Then I tried dry lube. Works great and cheaper than one shot. No need to clean anything.  I load 9x25 and they don't work well even in carbide dies without lube.


I don’t understand what you’re saying in the first paragraph


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I used one shot then placed them in cob cleaner for about 15 minutes for years. Them someone mentioned articles regarding the dangers of doing so. While I never had any problems it made me wonder. Just search on "tumble cleaning loaded ammunition", then make your decision whether you believe them or not.

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  • 1 month later...

Lake City ammunition plants tumbled loaded rounds every day.  BILLIONS per year.

 

There is also a report online about a guy who forgot he put some ammo in the tumbler and it ran for several days. NO issues.

 

I think it is Hodgdon that has stated that there is no issue from tumbling loaded rounds.

 

But if you are worried, shouldn't you worry about the vibration of the rounds being carried in your car to matches?????

 

 

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I think if there so much residual leftover on the case then your using too much. Try using less next time around and by the time you load the rounds there shouldnt be a noticeable amount left on them. Or at least such a small amount that dumping them on a towel and giving them a quick rub should remove whats remaining.

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The only problem I have with the lube after loaded is that it gums up the case gauge. I run em all in a hundo and after the first 100 I get some start to stick. then more and more. The ones that stick I put in a seperate bin then once im done I grab a rag and wipe them all quickly and clean the hundo and rerun them. What makes things bad is that 1 or 2 rounds that made it thought the press without a primer or a bullet.

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4 minutes ago, m700 said:

The only problem I have with the lube after loaded is that it gums up the case gauge. I run em all in a hundo and after the first 100 I get some start to stick. then more and more. The ones that stick I put in a seperate bin then once im done I grab a rag and wipe them all quickly and clean the hundo and rerun them. What makes things bad is that 1 or 2 rounds that made it thought the press without a primer or a bullet.

That’s why I tumble them right off the press. They are super clean, shiny and slick. The Hundo stays spotless.

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I do get some issues with tiny bits of media getting stuck on the lower rim causing “failures”

 

but I just realized I have compressed air nearby...doh!

 

i only polish match rounds and a revo is so much more forgiving anyway.  Cracked loaded cases just get shot, then dumped in the scrap brass pile.

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  • 2 weeks later...

What I'm about to say might seem sacrilegious, but it was actually recommended to me by a gunsmith when I was having lots of failures to extract in spite of a correctly-tensioned extractor on my 2011 Edge.

He suggested that I lay them out on a cloth and give them a light spray of WD-40. When I asked whether it damages the primers, he said it had never happened. It seems to remove the lube perfectly, helps in feeding through magazines and really helps with extraction.
As long as the misting is light and you roll them around in the cloth, it doesn't result in dieseling and smoke. Apparently, in Italy, most people shooting 40S&W in standard division do this.

Anyway, I did it for over 35,000 rounds to date, and never had any issues - I even take a WD-40 soaked arg in a ziplock baggie when I fly to overseas matches and give the match ammo I purchase a rub.

Edited to add - I don't do this with .223 rifle rounds - too concerned with possible dieseling issues. I give those a quick tumble in corn cob to remove any excess lube.

Edited by Cliveb
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10 hours ago, Cliveb said:

What I'm about to say might seem sacrilegious, but it was actually recommended to me by a gunsmith when I was having lots of failures to extract in spite of a correctly-tensioned extractor on my 2011 Edge.

He suggested that I lay them out on a cloth and give them a light spray of WD-40. When I asked whether it damages the primers, he said it had never happened. It seems to remove the lube perfectly, helps in feeding through magazines and really helps with extraction.
As long as the misting is light and you roll them around in the cloth, it doesn't result in dieseling and smoke. Apparently, in Italy, most people shooting 40S&W in standard division do this.

Anyway, I did it for over 35,000 rounds to date, and never had any issues - I even take a WD-40 soaked arg in a ziplock baggie when I fly to overseas matches and give the match ammo I purchase a rub.

Edited to add - I don't do this with .223 rifle rounds - too concerned with possible dieseling issues. I give those a quick tumble in corn cob to remove any excess lube.


I’d have found a new “gunsmith” the second that came out of his mouth. 

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Yikes.

 

In the past I used a dry silicone spray.  But I was new to all this at the time and was probably using it as a crutch, can't remember the last time I sprayed any rounds.

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1 hour ago, Ssanders224 said:


I’d have found a new “gunsmith” the second that came out of his mouth. 

What, precisely is your issue with it?

I too had my doubts, but as I said, 35,000 rounds later and no problems to report.

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18 hours ago, Cliveb said:

What, precisely is your issue with it?

I too had my doubts, but as I said, 35,000 rounds later and no problems to report.

 

My issue is simply that anyone (much less a smith) would suggest that WD40 on ammo is a good solution to an improperly built/tuned gun. 

That's ridiculous, and if I ever heard a "gunsmith" say "Oh your Limited gun wont extract? You just need some oil on your ammo!" they would instantly lose any credibility with me. 

 

An Edge that is built & tuned even near correct, paired with good ammo doesn't need oily ammo to function. 

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