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Clothes for shooting in the rain


highhope
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Shot IDPA national last Friday in the rain, terrible exprience, cold and wet, btw can't see the dot sometimes. 

I am shopping some waterproof clothes for shooting in the rain to keep warm and dry, maybe some light weight/low level waterproof softshells?  I am not a outdoor expert, need some suggestions, thanks a lot. 

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At a match, you are going to be standing around a lot, and then moving quite briskly. For the standing, have a coat. And a raincoat if it is raining. Get rid of the coat for the short period that you are actually shooting.

Have a hat or cap to keep the water away from your glasses. Maybe an umbrella too, when not running with your gun.

Keep your feet dry and warm.

Keep your hands and fingers warm!

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Good rain gear isn't cheap. I have a cheap set of rain gear that I usually keep in my truck. It's light weight and won't break the bank if I ruin it while shooting.

 

But I usually skip that week if it looks like rain. The rain isn't so much am issue as the mud that comes with it.

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Look at a Patagonia Catalog.  I use one of their resistant shells designed for cross country skiing, cycling, etc.  They are breathable, light weight and will keep you dry in anything but a torrential downpour that last for hours.  Mine fold up small enough to put in a jacket pocket.   I also have a heavier Columbia OmniDry waterproof, breathable jacket with hood that I use when I can take it off to shoot.  If it is raining hard I keep the Patagonia on.  It doesn't interfere with movements.

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2 hours ago, perttime said:

At a match, you are going to be standing around a lot, and then moving quite briskly. For the standing, have a coat. And a raincoat if it is raining. Get rid of the coat for the short period that you are actually shooting.

Have a hat or cap to keep the water away from your glasses. Maybe an umbrella too, when not running with your gun.

Keep your feet dry and warm.

Keep your hands and fingers warm!

Thank you sir!

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1 hour ago, zzt said:

Look at a Patagonia Catalog.  I use one of their resistant shells designed for cross country skiing, cycling, etc.  They are breathable, light weight and will keep you dry in anything but a torrential downpour that last for hours.  Mine fold up small enough to put in a jacket pocket.   I also have a heavier Columbia OmniDry waterproof, breathable jacket with hood that I use when I can take it off to shoot.  If it is raining hard I keep the Patagonia on.  It doesn't interfere with movements.

I will check Patagonia website for the shells, thank you sir!

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Frogg Toggs are inexpensive and work well to keep rain out. The ones I have don't lend anything towards warmth, though. Get them an extra size bigger and put a thermal jacket liner underneath.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

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Range Master should cancel the match.

Running in the rain- wet and muddy ground,running while finger is on or near the trigger--not a good idea.

Been shooting IPSC for approx 30 years. Slipped over on muddy ground once.

Running on wet/muddy ground- slipped - landed on my knees and elbows and luckily kept finger

outside of trigger guard.

A safe day is a good day.

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14 hours ago, N3WWN said:

Frogg Toggs are inexpensive and work well to keep rain out. The ones I have don't lend anything towards warmth, though. Get them an extra size bigger and put a thermal jacket liner underneath.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

Frog Togs are good for light duty and cheap enough. Other poly coated nylon products are more durable, Fashionable, and expensive. Depending on your need it may be worth investing in a rain suit. I recommend against gore Tex or similar products. 
 

GoreTex is mostly hype. I’ve worn the issued ECWES since the first generation came out in late 80s. It’s neither breathable nor rain proof. Sweat doesn’t magically evaporate through the pores and water leaks in the seams. I’ve also tried several brands of commercial GoreTex rain gear and boots. All expensive. All uniformly disappointing performance. I advise friends to avoid GoreTex and similar products. Buy good poly coated nylon wet weather gear for when you are stationary. When moving you will sweat and be wet anyway, so stow the snivel fear and get to work. Put on snivel gear at the halt. 

 

Warmth. A mid or light weight polar fleece type jacket is useful. Relatively durable. Effective insulation. Inexpensive. Doesn’t stop wind at all,

so you may need another layer under or over it. Layers are the important part of dressing for the cold. Cotton absorbs water and chills you, so avoid cotton fabrics when you expect to be cold and wet (unless working around flame hazards that cause synthetics to melt).  Wool is better, but expensive and a pain in the neck to care for. 
 

Footwear shouldn’t be neglected in cold and wet conditions. Good traction is always important. Properly treated leather hiking boots work well.  
 

All that said, I don’t shoot matches in the rain or mud because it’s neither fun nor safe to run around in the mud. I did that for a living once, people got hurt often from falls. Bad juju. Rain gear for a light shower is a different matter. 

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It really depends on how rainy it is, how muddy it is, and how much cover the range has. 
 

Generally, I’ll throw on rain pants unless it’s very hot out, and an oversized rain jacket (covering the gun etc. also so I don’t need a gun cover) when I’m not actively shooting. I also keep a golf umbrella in my car and have brought it out on occasion. 
 

If the range doesn’t have dry places to put your range bag, I suggest bringing a trash bag to use to keep it dry. 

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I won't shoot in a downpour.  Drizzle or light rain, yes.  Unfortunately, Patagonia no longer makes the ultra lightweight soft jacket I use in summer.  It was designed for cross country skiing or cycling, with long arms and length.  No matter how far you extend your arms of bend over, nothing rides up.  Here are some slightly heavier substitutes.

 

https://www.rei.com/product/143469/patagonia-houdini-air-jacket-mens

https://www.rei.com/product/111927/patagonia-airshed-pullover-jacket-mens

https://www.marmot.com/mens-bantamweight-jacket-31590.html?dwvar_31590_color=001&dwvar_31590_size=00030XL&cgid=men_jackets_waterproof-and-rain#start=1

 

I've become addicted to materials that keep you dry.  In the summer I wear lightweight, breathable tactical long pants from Columbia.  They weigh ounces.  For shirts it is either Arctic Cool or Mission T-shirts.  Both literally remove sweat from your skin and evaporate it.  Both have active cooling fabrics.  Junk like Under Armour or ExOficio just glue your sweat to you.  The main difference between the Artic Cool and the Mission is the AC distributes the moisture throughout the fabric while evaporating.  So the cooling effect is more gentle, but overall.  the mission does not distribute, so when a gentle breeze blows you feel like an ice pack was applied where the sweat was absorbed.  Columbia's Freeze Zero works well also, but is heavier.  Mission's Activematrix underwear wicks, is breathable and cooling.  Their cooling towel is a must have, as are their arm sleeves (for me).

 

For cooler weather nothing is more comfortable than a Patagonia Capeline silk weigh T under a Lowe Alpine Arctic Tech Level 1 fleece.  Cover with a light weight shell for wind and rain.

For slightly cooler temps, a mid-weight Capilene T with long sleeves under a Polar Tech long sleeved shirt it tops.  Colder yet, add a Patagonia LIII pull over fleece that you can tuck in your pants.  If it's below 30 I also wear a Beretta Down shooting coat, and remove it when it's my turn to shoot.  At 40 degrees I wear Capilene long leg underwear.  For 30 I wear polar tech 'long johns' under my pants.

 

All of these things wick moisture away from you and either evaporate it or transfer it to the next layer for evaporation.  I am never wet when hiking up Mt. Vesuvius in summer or climbing up and down mountainsides in the Dolomites and Alps.  Even hiking in the Bershires where the temp is 90 and the humidity is 90%, this stuff wicks, evaporates and cools.

 

BTW, I do like Columbia's stuff.  I have a lot of it.  It works.  It's just not the fastest or lightest weight.

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Rain gear choices around here depends on the season.  Summer and rain,  we just use umbrellas.  Any rain gear will make you sweat and you’ll be just as wet.  Colder temps,  I use a cheap frog tog coat big enough to go over any cold weather gear I’m already wearing and an umbrella.

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