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Overshooting A zone on transitions

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Hey Guys, 

 

I'm noticing that I'm pushing the dot past the A zone on nearly all of my transitions. On narrow transitions I "swing" the gun from one target to the next, while on wide transitions I tend to pull my arms in closer to the body and then push back out as I get on the second target. How do I correct this? Do I just slow down and make it a conscious effort to not overshoot? Thoughts would be greatly appreciated. 

 

Kevin

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kinda an arc thing,,, close u are better off staying out, farther apart targets, come in rotate re present is better as it is a smaller arc distance. You just need to dry fire with a par time clock and see what works for you and get a feel for the distance between targets

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After re-reading my post, I didn't word it very well. I do what you suggest Joe, but I'm wondering on the closer targets is there a way to train myself to stop on the A zone instead blowing right over it and then having to swing back? 

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What you describe happening is due to transitioning the gun with only your arms and not your legs. I posted a transition drills video on my YouTube channel. Check it out.

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Listen to Cha-Lee. He is 100% spot on. Swinging your arms causes overtravel or sloppy aim on the next target. Use your lower body to transition and your arms just go along for the ride. Check out his YouTube page...he has drill videos specifically for this. When you dry fire for 30 minutes and do transitions your legs and glutes should be sore the next day, not your shoulders and arms. If not you are doing it wrong.

All about the cone of fire...right Cha-Lee? :)  see, I was listening.

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Cha-lee hit this one right on the head.  you can practice that one dry firing in the garage and fix that habit.  crazy how such a small problem can cost you so many points and time on the clock.  i guess that is just the name of the game though.

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*Mind Blown* -- My shoulder is sore as all heck after practicing transitions yesterday. Thank you VERY much for helping out with this all, and especially CHA-LEE.

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Cha-Lee  is right about using your legs. I think that strategy has definitely helped me stop on the spot. I wonder if I was also deciding to press the trigger too late?   Meaning, if I’m going to over swing I can’t decide to do it when it’s in the center of the a zone. I won’t actually send the round till I’m past the “a” And by extension perhaps I should start pressing as I’m coming into the target cross the A/C perf?? 

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Keep the gun out during the transition. There is no need to pull it back.

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On 10/25/2019 at 10:44 PM, CHA-LEE said:

What you describe happening is due to transitioning the gun with only your arms and not your legs. I posted a transition drills video on my YouTube channel. Check it out.

So I understand the transition with legs not arms, but do you keep your core in a fixed position or allow it to 'coil' up?

 

I used to be big into golfing and understood the explosiveness of transitioning the swing with you core and driving with your legs. My concern with this same approach for shooting is creating unwanted tension. I haven't experimented with it too much to know what works better but I feel like a transition with core for small transitions while adding legs for longer ones would be the fastest. Of course, keeping your arms in a somewhat fixed position.

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It’s usually a blend of legs and core depending on how far the motion is. The important part is to NOT move the gun with only your arms.

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Only thing I'll add, is I notice I do the same thing if I let my shoulders get too tense.  I also do a lot of target transitions in dry fire without pulling the trigger, paying very close attention to where the sight stops on targets.  

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Only thing I'll add, is I notice I do the same thing if I let my shoulders get too tense.  I also do a lot of target transitions in dry fire without pulling the trigger, paying very close attention to where the sight stops on targets.  


Now where have I heard this advice before


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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4 hours ago, Merldizzle said:

Snap your head to the target and look rather than tracking the sight/dot to the next target, game changing :)


Turning your head to initiate the transition usually results in a poor hit on the final shot in the prior array. 
 

Keeping your head still but moving only your eyes to the next target achieves the same goal while maintaining good quality hits on the last target.

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2 hours ago, CHA-LEE said:


Turning your head to initiate the transition usually results in a poor hit on the final shot in the prior array. 
 

Keeping your head still but moving only your eyes to the next target achieves the same goal while maintaining good quality hits on the last target.

Shouldn’t be looking eyes or snapping head until the shot is broken either way 🤷‍♂️

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4 hours ago, Merldizzle said:

Shouldn’t be looking eyes or snapping head until the shot is broken either way 🤷‍♂️

Yes, but most people can’t stop moving their head to the next target while they are firing the shot. 

Edited by CHA-LEE

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2 things:

 

1- shoulder tension is bad

2- your eyes must be faster at the A-Zone than your gun, don´t move the gun fast (wrestle it), move your eyes fast.  

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On 11/28/2019 at 4:47 PM, CHA-LEE said:

Yes, but most people can’t stop moving their head to the next target while they are firing the shot. 

I've been struggling with this for a while now..trying to shoot to fast Going work this drill..

 

! Thanks for the tips Cha-Lee!

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Before I were able to call my shots, I only think I have bad grip. Now I can call my shot better, what happen is I over swing, one C then pull the gun back, another C on the other side. 

 

Fast eyes moving with legs are all great skills to have. Take very long time to train. I have spend 1 year already, can't perform it 100%

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