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Dont see targets


midatlantic
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Hi,

 

   Any techniques anyone can offer to stop failing to shoot targets in the more complex stages? Shot two matches this weekend and in both failed to engage targets. Full disclosure, I aint that good, but the matches are fun.

   Even after noting each target, coming up with a stage plan, when the buzzer rings I'll sometimes finish the stage thinking I hit all the targets...not. 

 

I realize this is a total head thing, but advice welcome on how to make sure I SEE each target during the stage. FYI I'm still new at this, am not so young anymore, and probably still thinking too much to avoid a DQ...

'

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1 hour ago, hitman_usmc said:

Continue to work on stage planning/programming. You should be able to mentally run the the stage without looking at it before it’s your turn. 

^^^This.  Walking the stage is not the same thing as visualizing exactly where the place I going to aim on EACH target is.  I used to walk the stages a bunch and think I will shoot this array and then that array, etc.  I would often make mistakes.  When I started to visualizing (I actually close my eyes) and picture every target.  If I can’t instantaneously identity each target with my sights on the target where I want them to be, I am not ready to shoot.  I try to do this every time there is a new shooter until it’s my turn.

Edited by B585
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3 hours ago, midatlantic said:

Hi,

 

   Any techniques anyone can offer to stop failing to shoot targets in the more complex stages? Shot two matches this weekend and in both failed to engage targets. Full disclosure, I aint that good, but the matches are fun.

   Even after noting each target, coming up with a stage plan, when the buzzer rings I'll sometimes finish the stage thinking I hit all the targets...not. 

 

I realize this is a total head thing, but advice welcome on how to make sure I SEE each target during the stage. FYI I'm still new at this, am not so young anymore, and probably still thinking too much to avoid a DQ...

'

So hes right about active visualization. I walk a stage as many times as i can. Some people dont take full advantage. But i do. Because it helps burn everything into your head. And you never know. You may see something on your last walk through that you didnt before. Like an odd angle or something you can take advantage of. 
Then i mentally rehearse over and over until its committed to memory. Usually 2 shooters from my turn i stop pasting and i walk away. Rehearse my plan mentally as many times as i can. Then when i step up to the line i rehearse it once more at the make ready.
Something i also do to help with just getting reps in like this is i have dry fire targets all over my living room. And i commit different sequences to memory and i dry practice shooting the targets in that sequence. On a stage it may not be advantageous to engage targets exactly left to right and right to left. Things like that. But it also helps you get the mental reps in of committing things like that to memory.  

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I would also add to all of the above to try to visualize it like the firearm is in front of you, see the sights even though they are not there, that way when they are you feel like you have already shot the stage. just keep practicing and you will get better at stage planning.

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yeah.. good stuff.  been there, done that. and a 2mike FTE sucks.
ill add - a good stage offers a few ways to run it - before the match try to solve the problem, and narrow it down some.
once your squad shows up and the stage briefing is read narrow it down to one. call it engaged. and walkthrough your plan as many times as you can.
once it feels smooth -  its time to get married.  lock it in. visualize the hell out of it. dont change it. sneak in more walkthroughs while in the hole and on deck.

then.. face away from the stage, close your eyes and see the whole stage - every target, reload and key position, and feel the footwork.
keep doing this until its hard wired in your head.

when the RO calls make ready - draw your unloaded gun and airgun it again from the start box.  try to feel it.
then.. stand by..
 

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It also takes practice - lots of it.

 

When you started tying your shoelaces, remember how you had to concentrate on each movement ?

 

Right now, you have too many things to concentrate on because this is all new to you.

 

With all the great ideas above, and more practice/experience,  you'll get it     :) 

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When you do your walk through count targets not # of shots. Then when you are waiting to shoot, close your eyes and run through the course of fire with the #ed targets in your head. It takes time and practice. I find keeping your eyes closed and turning off ear pro so you are not listening to someone elses cadence/ shooting helps.

 then when you get on the line to shoot. just think about using your sights.

 

 

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12 hours ago, hitman_usmc said:

Continue to work on stage planning/programming. You should be able to mentally run the the stage without looking at it before it’s your turn. 

 

9 hours ago, 2Alphamikenoshoot said:

So hes right about active visualization. I walk a stage as many times as i can. Some people dont take full advantage. But i do. Because it helps burn everything into your head. And you never know. You may see something on your last walk through that you didnt before. Like an odd angle or something you can take advantage of. 
Then i mentally rehearse over and over until its committed to memory. Usually 2 shooters from my turn i stop pasting and i walk away. Rehearse my plan mentally as many times as i can. Then when i step up to the line i rehearse it once more at the make ready.
Something i also do to help with just getting reps in like this is i have dry fire targets all over my living room. And i commit different sequences to memory and i dry practice shooting the targets in that sequence. On a stage it may not be advantageous to engage targets exactly left to right and right to left. Things like that. But it also helps you get the mental reps in of committing things like that to memory.  

Visualization is definitely the key!  I once took a class with Mike Seeklander and he stated that you are not ready to shoot a stage until you can turn your back to the stage and shoot the stage in your mind.  You need to practice visualizing. Complete your walk through numbering each target as you develop your plan to shoot the stage.  When your the on deck shooter, go through the stage as many times as possible  Remember your target counting.  Being a new shooter, you might need to shoot the stage counting targets.  If you can't remember the total count, you can always break down each array into groups. (Example first array has 4 targets, second has two etc.)  It will get easier with time!

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  • 10 months later...

Mostly what I see, is people trying to engage in assault course way before they are truly skilled in the fundamentals. When they are confronted with all the extra demands, their shooting goes to hell in a handcart. Dont add complications too soon and dont add many at a time, and you'll progress more swiftly and enjoyably. If you can't yet average under 2 seconds on a bill drill, stay on the square range until you can.

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One important aspect of visualization is to know the number of targets at each position and be able to count the full round count for the stage. It's too easy to think "go to the port, shoot all targets, move two steps right, shoot the array on the right..."

 

The part in italic is what will get you in trouble for two reasons. First, you can miss targets if you're just relying on your vision because they can be spread out or require a lean. Second, when stages get more complicated, you can see same target from multiple locations and you have to know which targets are part of you plan and when. Otherwise, you'll end up shooting some targets twice and missing some others. 

 

Make it a part of you visualization to count the rounds (which you should always do). Instead of "bam, bam, turn, bam, bam" think "one, two, turn, three, four." It's important for ammo management and it will help you with not missing targets since you will know when your count is off during visualization. 

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