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Price of Optioned Out 750 vs 1100?


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I'm comparing the 750 and 1100 but as I have no experience reloading I'm insure what options and accessories I would want to add to each machine right out of the box.

 

The 1100 (when it's finally available) seems like it will come with most of the accessories you'd need and want to reload comfortably.  The 750 on the other hand has an attractive price but it doesn't include the case feeder, swager or dies making the actual price difference smaller.

 

Are there other must have upgrades I'd likely end up adding to the 750 that would just bring it closer to the price of the 1100 or beyond the previously mentioned would they be about the same?

 

Any feedback is appreciated.

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The 750 you should get

case feeder

Strong mount

Toolhead/measure/ conversion kit for each caliber

 

You would want to add at some point

Roller handle

Bullet tray(Unless you are planning bullet feeder

Bullet feeder

 

If you plan on swaging on the press you would have to go aftermarket and void warranty if you break shell plate.

 

The 1100 should be GTG with the exception of caliber conversions.and a bullet feeder.

 

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4 hours ago, Michael303 said:

  I'd end up adding to the 750 that would bring it closer to the price of the 1100

 

Check with Dillon - they list the price of both fully decked out - believe the 750 

is around $1,400 and the 1100 is around $2,000.  But, that's rough estimate -

Dillon lists the prices in their monthly magazine.    :) 

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33 minutes ago, Michael303 said:

Initially just 9mm but I'll probably do 223 and 300blk if I've got the machine.

 

There are probably any number of ways at looking at whether one machine would be more appropriate than the other.

 

One way to look at it is how many cartridges will you reload for, how many rounds per cartridge, will you be changing back and forth on a regular basis or only once or twice a year.

 

Loading large amounts of a single cartridge tends to favor the 1050/1100. Loading smaller amounts of multiple cartridges tends to favor the 650/750.

 

Exactly where that trade-off is depends on the individuals needs.

 

Edit: And as TrackCage pointed out while I was typing my response it is cheaper to change calibers on a 650/750.

 

Edited by ddc
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4 hours ago, m700 said:

The 750 you should get

case feeder

Strong mount

Toolhead/measure/ conversion kit for each caliber

 

You would want to add at some point

Roller handle

Bullet tray(Unless you are planning bullet feeder

Bullet feeder

 

If you plan on swaging on the press you would have to go aftermarket and void warranty if you break shell plate.

 

The 1100 should be GTG with the exception of caliber conversions.and a bullet feeder.

 

Thanks for the feedback.

 

29 minutes ago, TrackCage said:

Caliber conversions cost a lot more on the 1050/1100 than on the 650/750. Most people I know with a 1050 have dedicated it to one caliber.

Thanks.  I'll keep that in mind.  I don't have plans to do more than 2 or 3 calibers at this point.  Primarily just 9mm.

 

26 minutes ago, ddc said:

 

There are probably any number of ways at looking at whether one machine would be more appropriate than the other.

 

One way to look at it is how many cartridges will you reload for, how many rounds per cartridge, will you be changing back and forth on a regular basis or only once or twice a year.

 

Loading large amounts of a single cartridge tends to favor the 1050/1100. Loading smaller amounts of multiple cartridges tends to favor the 650/750.

 

Exactly where that trade-off is depends on the individuals needs.

 

Edit: And as TrackCage pointed out while I was typing my response it is cheaper to change calibers on a 650/750.

 

Thanks for the feedback.  I've done quite a bit or searching the boards and have been leaning towards the 1100 based on the expectation that I'll primarily be doing 9mm with the possibility of one or two rifle cals later on.  At this point I'm trying to get an idea of the real world setup costs of the 750 and 1100 based on what accessories most people buy above and beyond the machine itself.

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Actually the correct answer is: "Get both"... lol

 

Get the 1100 to load your bulk 9mm.

Get the 750 to load everything else.

Set up your bullet/case feeders to swing both ways.

 

(I love spending other people's money.)

 

 

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You know you want it--- get the 1100--I don't know anyone who has bought an  RL 1050 or might buy the new RL 1100 who has said " I wish I'd bought the  ( insert sq deal, 450, 500, 650 )  " . For durability; steel beats aluminum . Think of your purchase as an investment because that's what it is.

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I second having one machine per major caliber you shoot.

I also second doing the math on calibers you're going to load and look at the difference between ammo you buy versus make and see where the tip over point is to "pay off" all your initial costs for that caliber. For example if you're only saving $0.06 per round over buying and your total initial cost to get a machine, components and such is 1.300 dollars then you're going to load almost 22,000 rounds to break even on your investment.

Also, there are countless posts similar to yours of, "I want to load 9mm. Oh and .223/5.56 and .300blk." They're oranges and grapefruits when it comes to making those rounds. So be prepared for learning twice as much information and things to do and look for when you're going to start loading pistol and rifle right off the start.

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7 hours ago, 2tuf4u said:

You know you want it--- get the 1100--I don't know anyone who has bought an  RL 1050 or might buy the new RL 1100 who has said " I wish I'd bought the  ( insert sq deal, 450, 500, 650 )  " . For durability; steel beats aluminum . Think of your purchase as an investment because that's what it is.

I'm definitely leaning that way. The on-machine swage seems great because I imagine doing it by hand would suck.

 

1 hour ago, rowdyb said:

I second having one machine per major caliber you shoot.

I also second doing the math on calibers you're going to load and look at the difference between ammo you buy versus make and see where the tip over point is to "pay off" all your initial costs for that caliber. For example if you're only saving $0.06 per round over buying and your total initial cost to get a machine, components and such is 1.300 dollars then you're going to load almost 22,000 rounds to break even on your investment.

Also, there are countless posts similar to yours of, "I want to load 9mm. Oh and .223/5.56 and .300blk." They're oranges and grapefruits when it comes to making those rounds. So be prepared for learning twice as much information and things to do and look for when you're going to start loading pistol and rifle right off the start.

Thanks for the heads up. 

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If you plan on competition shooting in USPSA that means a lot of ammo, normally in just one caliber. (I load mostly 9mm and occasionally run some 40 & 45).

 

Don’t stop at the 650/750 go directly to the 1100/1050, just the swage station alone is worth it.

 

BTW, while loading can save money (don’t count on it), it is also a hobby in itself. You probably have noticed many posts here on BE about all the bullets, powder and accuracy, and that means there is an interest in experimentation.  If competition shooting is what it’s all about then numbers is what’s important, crank out the ammo after finding the load which works then go and shoot, a lot!
 

 

Edited by HesedTech
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A few years ago there is no way I could 'justify' cost of a 1050 using the rounds per month criterion. But a 1050 is the machine I wanted to load on and while not wealthy, I could afford it.

i now have three 1050's and there was never a day I said 'should have bought a 650.' I'm sure a 750 is a fine machine but 8 stations, swaging, and priming on the down-stroke are things of beauty.

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On 9/25/2019 at 10:25 PM, 2tuf4u said:

You know you want it--- get the 1100--I don't know anyone who has bought an  RL 1050 or might buy the new RL 1100 who has said " I wish I'd bought the  ( insert sq deal, 450, 500, 650 )  " . For durability; steel beats aluminum . Think of your purchase as an investment because that's what it is.

 

This!  Shortly followed by the second 1050 purchase. 

 

On 9/26/2019 at 5:21 AM, rowdyb said:

I second having one machine per major caliber you shoot.

I also second doing the math on calibers you're going to load and look at the difference between ammo you buy versus make and see where the tip over point is to "pay off" all your initial costs for that caliber. For example if you're only saving $0.06 per round over buying and your total initial cost to get a machine, components and such is 1.300 dollars then you're going to load almost 22,000 rounds to break even on your investment.

Also, there are countless posts similar to yours of, "I want to load 9mm. Oh and .223/5.56 and .300blk." They're oranges and grapefruits when it comes to making those rounds. So be prepared for learning twice as much information and things to do and look for when you're going to start loading pistol and rifle right off the start.

 

Remember unless you ware out the press and it has to be replaced, the brake even point is actually sooner than most think.  What is a used working 1050 worth?  That is your target number to look at for your ROI, as you still own the asset of the equipment.   If you calculate brake even all the way to 100% of original cash out of pocket to be recovered, and you still have working equipment... well you actually made money since you have the asset value of the press. 

 

Also loading for 300blk, if you shoot it allot (I do) your ROI will happen much faster since commercial loaded 300blk is so expensive.  Then load for suppressed (I do) and it gets even faster on your ROI as your savings go from cents to half a dollar per round.  Then of course comes the increase in quality to the rounds you load. 

 

On 9/27/2019 at 6:11 AM, Michael303 said:

I think I'm sold on the 1100.  💰💰💰😁

 

Great choice.   I went from a RCBS Rockchucker II single stage 30yrs ago, to a D550 20yrs ago.  I eventually jumped to the D1050 , then added a 2nd D1050 for large primer and brass processing for my .308 about 2yrs ago.   

 

BTW the 1050 (I am sure the 1100 too) with the 1500 case trimmer and the forming die, with the built in primer pocket swage, turns mil. Lake City brass into beautiful 300BLK brass.  

 

IMG_3061.jpg

Edited by helocat
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On 9/28/2019 at 11:30 PM, 683beretta said:

Dillon should just factor in the roller handle as part of the base package.

I'll bet a ton of 650/750 users have stepped up. 

I have some spare ball handles if anyones buying😁

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On 9/28/2019 at 1:01 PM, helocat said:

you ware out the press and it has to be replaced,

but he's not buying a used press. his actual investment is the new price. and the cost of all the components. plus ancillary crap like a scale, flip tray, chrono and so on. Otherwise you're finessing the numbers to make it seem nicer. And if he is going to do multiple calibers on the 1050 his price is substantially higher!

 

the greatest truism when buying a press is, "You don't save any money reloading yourself. You just get more for what you already spend."

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16 minutes ago, rowdyb said:

the greatest truism when buying a press is, "You don't save any money reloading yourself. You just get more for what you already spend."

 

And that is so true. When I started out I thought I was going to save money...looking back I just have to chuckle.

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On 9/30/2019 at 7:31 AM, rowdyb said:

but he's not buying a used press. his actual investment is the new price. and the cost of all the components. plus ancillary crap like a scale, flip tray, chrono and so on. Otherwise you're finessing the numbers to make it seem nicer. And if he is going to do multiple calibers on the 1050 his price is substantially higher!

 

the greatest truism when buying a press is, "You don't save any money reloading yourself. You just get more for what you already spend."

 

I agree with you 100% on "You don't save any money reloading yourself. You just get more for what you already spend."  When we factor in time for sure. 

 

I disagree with "finessing the numbers to make it seem nicer", that is not the point.  The comment on a used press is not that he is buying one, its when he is done using his new one it has value used.  Unless the asset of the press is used up (wore out dead, unuseable), you still retain the value of the press.   When you are done with it and can still sell it, it has value.  We all know a used working Dillon Press not only will sell but it will sell quickly and for a decent price. 

 

Example A;

Buy reloading equipment (press, dies, scale, case prep etc.) for $3k use it for 5yrs then sell it used for $1200.   Your actual cost to own and use that equipment is only $1800, not $3k. Your 5yr cost is $1800. 

 

Example B:

Buy $3k of primers, powder and bullets and shoot all of them over the same 5yrs your actual cost for them is the full $3k since you have nothing of resale value.   No asset.  Your 5yr cost is $3k. 

 

Even if we say "I am never going to sell this", it's still an asset of value that we own as long as it has value.  Most of our gun collections are a good example of this, they are not stacks of $100 bills in our safes but they do have real value that goes up and down.   Maybe not the value we paid for them new, usually the case, but they have value as assets that if needed we could trade for other assets like cash, precious metals or more guns. 

 

 

Edited by helocat
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  • 2 weeks later...

Helocat - This is a great post..Logical, grounded, and with the facts that many may not want to admit too...Your post just made me decide to purchase the new 1100 unit when it is released while keeping my 650 to use for smaller runs of the other calibers I already am set up to run today.....Great Post Sir...Mark

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