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I'm getting ready to step up from a Rock Chucker to a progressive. Been using the RC for a year. It's great, but I'm kicking myself for not buying a progressive to start with. It will do everything a single stage press will, and many things it won't. I'm not a fan of spending money twice.

 

So here I am. Ready to drop the dough and now I'm back to square one. 

 

I have ruled out the SDB because in need to reload rifle. 

 

I have ruled out the 550 because I'm not flipping the shell plate 2000 times to do 500 rounds.

 

I was set on a 650, but now I'm told I can't get one and should get the new 750. I haven't seen much on that press yet. It looks to me that rather than the 750, I should just step up to the 1050 and be done with it.

 

For the record, I need to load 9mm, .40,  10mm, .45, .223 and .308 and my minimum right now is ~ 2500 rounds a month. A year from now, that may double.

 

Would you get the 750, or go straight for the 1050?

 

TIA

 

A.S.

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8 minutes ago, Alkyshooter said:

 

I have ruled out the 550 because I'm not flipping the shell plate 2000 times to do 500 rounds.

 

 

OK for the record, you would flip the plate 503 times for 500 rounds, and it should take about an hour or a little less.

Unless you're running each round through all the dies before starting the next one, then it would get flipped 2000 times and take about 4 hours, but why? 

 

I'd say either get the 550 or go straight to the 1050. JMO. 

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38 minutes ago, Yondering said:

 

OK for the record, you would flip the plate 503 times for 500 rounds, and it should take about an hour or a little less.

Unless you're running each round through all the dies before starting the next one, then it would get flipped 2000 times and take about 4 hours, but why? 

 

I'd say either get the 550 or go straight to the 1050. JMO. 

 

I was looking at moving the shell plate 4 times per round. Math is not my strong point though. If I load 500 rounds, and I have to turn the shell plate 4 times for each round, that is 2000 times I have turn the plate. 

 

Ok, now I see my bad math. This is what happens when you start with a single stage press. For me, that was dumb. I forgot to account for the fact that once the shell plate is loaded, there are 4 cases in there. So 503 is correct. Dammit.

 

Still, I don't want to use my hand like that so many times. I have RA and the less I can do with my hands (and everything else for that matter) the better off I am. That's why I just don't want to do the repetitive motion, and one reason why I ruled out the 550. That and it's only 4 stations. I'd eventually like a bullet feeder as well, again, so I do less repetitive motion with my hands.

 

So would you say skip the 750 and go straight to the 1050 after what I just posted?

 

Thanks for pointing out my bad math and the advice.

 

A.S.

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I have one 650 that I have used since the late 90’s. I bought a second one so I would have one set up for large primers and one set for small primers. Don’t discount the single stage presses. I have 3 and a turret press as well.

750 or 1050...it is up to the options you are looking for. Both will do the job.

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The 1050 is great but you have to look at the average cost for caliber conversion on a 750 is $82 and $129 for the 1050. The choice is yours. I run two 550’s for my smaller batches and my 1050 for my 49 competition rds. The 1050 is awesome.

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55 minutes ago, Gomar83 said:

The 1050 is great but you have to look at the average cost for caliber conversion on a 750 is $82 and $129 for the 1050. The choice is yours. I run two 550’s for my smaller batches and my 1050 for my 49 competition rds. The 1050 is awesome.

 

Does the 82 and 129 include the dies, or everything but the dies??? It seems to me when I was looking at the 650, the caliber change came with the dies. I could be wrong. I've read so much in the last month I'm fixing to go blind.

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The caliber conversion does not include the dies, toolhead, or powder measure. The avg. cost for Dillon dies are $72.

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With that many calibers you are loading stick with 750. 

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You never really waste money with a single stage press, it'll have it uses depriming, pulling bullets etc. so don't worry about that too much.

 

For the most part, 650/750 is you're loading several different types of calibers as the the conversions with the toolheads are very expensive. If you're doing a ton of one caliber then the 1050 comes into play. The 1050 also primers on the downward stroke and has quite a bit of adjustability on primer seating depth. Remember also the warranty is unlimited with the 650/750, versus 1 year for the 1050.

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I think that you should roll with the 750.  I love my 1050 but with that many calibers, you can probably buy 2 750’s for what you are going to spend on the 1050 with that many caliber conversions and tool heads.

 

 

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2 hours ago, ultimase said:

You never really waste money with a single stage press, it'll have it uses depriming, pulling bullets etc. so don't worry about that too much.

 

I have a single stage mounted to my bench to the right of my 650 with a 9mm shell holder and universal decapping die in it to make quick work of "ringers" while I am loading.    It gets used for rifle ammo, also, of course. 

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The 1050 will become quite expensive as you will need to buy a separate head for each set of dies--unless you want to reset the dies every time you change calibers/cartridges.

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I load almost the same calibers you are looking to load. (9mm, 45, 223, 243 & 308)  Here's my 2 cents.  I love and load on my XL650.  I have several upgrades and aftermarket parts on my Dillon.  The 650 will do everything you want and then some.  I also have a Swage-it for 223.  Is it as good as the swage on the 1050?  No, but it does the job for me.  The 650 is the way to go.  You can use all of your dies on the 650, no need to change dies.  You can also look up and interchange parts for caliber conversions.  all you need is the quick change kit.

Here's a link http://thegunwiki.com/apps/calconversion/index.asp

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I'm guessing that the 5,000 rounds / month that you feel you'll be loading next year,

will be mostly two calibers ?   (9mm and .40 ?)

 

I would bet it will be easier for you to own two reloaders - set up for your favorite

calibers, and possibly a third for the "Miscellaneous calibers".

 

You could reload the pistol with two SDB's ($900) and never have to switch those

calibers.   A 550 would allow you to inexpensively reload the other four calibers in

the small quantities that you probably reload them.

 

But, if you have a lot of $$$$ (sounds like you might) and RA, you might want to

go straight to the 1050 because the priming is done on the down stroke, rather

than a separate up motion.

 

Depends largely on numbers ($$$$ and quantities) and health concerns.    :) 

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Do yourself a favor and get the 1050. 308 sizing (and 223 to some extent)  is really hard on the shoulder and elbow in the 650. Really spendy as the toolheads are over $200 each, but your RA will thank you for it.

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I too learned on a RCBS Rock Chucker II.   Did a TON of 9mm on it back in the day.   I moved to a 550 and it worked great for me for years.  With the 550 you just get into the rhythm and advancing the plate is not that hard.   I loaded quite a bit on my 550 that way.   I still have it and use it for hand weighed precision rifle loads once I got the 1050 (then a second one)  As long as the budget is there, it will do the work and if you ever need to sell it, they hold their value.  So the actual cost of ownership is low as long as the cash can be tied up in it.  

 

Guys nailed it, the tool heads add up.   As for the powder system, its the same as the other presses if your leaving 100% set up tool heads.   In the beginning, get two, one you leave set up for your most common.   The 2nd reset your dies as needed.  Over time pick up some more tool heads as the budget recovers.  

 

BTW:  With the 1100 being released keep an eye out for guys selling off their 1050's.  I would not but there are always "gota have the latest" people out there.   Higher chance of a few more than normal used ones to pop up. 

 

For me I love to reload but my time is limited to do so.   I have set my equipment up to allow maximum output in a limited amount of time.   Two 1050's and both soon to be automated. 

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My vote is definitely a progressive, which would rule out the 550.  It is almost impossible to double-charge, since the shell plate automatically indexes.

 

Caliber conversions are cheaper (little quicker too, perhaps) on the 650 than the 1050.  2500 rounds per month is easily within the capabilities of any of the progressives (550 also) so there's not compelling factor for any of the Dillon progressives at that round count. 

 

Switching between large and small primers is a bit more effort with any of the presses.  If you expect to switch primer sizes frequently, perhaps consider two 650s, one for each size.  Also the primer mechanism is a different design between the 650 and the 750.  I don't have an experience with the 750's design, however not having had any issues with the 650 would make me hesitant to switch. 

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6 hours ago, helocat said:

I too learned on a RCBS Rock Chucker II.   Did a TON of 9mm on it back in the day.   I moved to a 550 and it worked great for me for years.  With the 550 you just get into the rhythm and advancing the plate is not that hard.   I loaded quite a bit on my 550 that way.   I still have it and use it for hand weighed precision rifle loads once I got the 1050 (then a second one)  As long as the budget is there, it will do the work and if you ever need to sell it, they hold their value.  So the actual cost of ownership is low as long as the cash can be tied up in it.  

 

Guys nailed it, the tool heads add up.   As for the powder system, its the same as the other presses if your leaving 100% set up tool heads.   In the beginning, get two, one you leave set up for your most common.   The 2nd reset your dies as needed.  Over time pick up some more tool heads as the budget recovers.  

 

BTW:  With the 1100 being released keep an eye out for guys selling off their 1050's.  I would not but there are always "gota have the latest" people out there.   Higher chance of a few more than normal used ones to pop up. 

 

For me I love to reload but my time is limited to do so.   I have set my equipment up to allow maximum output in a limited amount of time.   Two 1050's and both soon to be automated. 

 

 

This is is where I'm heading. I have the money to buy a 1050 and two extra caliber changes. That will get me going. RA is a miserable thing. I'd rather pay more and hurt less so I can still shoot. If I kill myself reloading then I have less feel good time to shoot. And I want to reload and shoot for as long as I can

 

Thanks for the replies.

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I had 2 650s. I wish I would’ve gotten the 1050 when I bought 2 650s. Didn’t know what I was missing with the 1050. Sold both 650s and now have a 1050. Get the 1050 you’ll wish you did if you get a 750. 

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I went with a 650 and I currently  load 9mm and 223. It’s a great press and does everything I want except swage primer pockets.  I would like to have bought a 1050 but i don’t load enough to justify the extra 800-900 dollars. Maybe a used one one day. 

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How much of each ammo are you loading? If like most people it is 9mm, .40 and .223 then buy a 750 or 1050 for those three. Use a good turret for everything else, for me that is .308, 6.5 Creedmoor, 6.5 Grendel and 6.8. I still have my old 550 for 45 ACP and charging, seating bullets on the 6.8. I keep the 550 set up for large primers, my 650 for small primers.

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On September 15, 2019 at 6:19 AM, The Donald said:

How much of each ammo are you loading? If like most people it is 9mm, .40 and .223 then buy a 750 or 1050 for those three. Use a good turret for everything else, for me that is .308, 6.5 Creedmoor, 6.5 Grendel and 6.8. I still have my old 550 for 45 ACP and charging, seating bullets on the 6.8. I keep the 550 set up for large primers, my 650 for small primers.

 

 

Thanks  for all the replies. I don't think the turret is a good option for anything. I just don't want to use my hands that much. That's one reason why I'll most likely sell the RC. I have to pull the lever (leeeever if you are British) too many times just to make a round, and I'm trying to decrease my hand use as much as possible.

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13 hours ago, chevrofreak said:

Well then you need a Dillon 1050/1100 with an Ammobot 😜

 

LOL. I'm thinking about it. Don't know how I missed the Mark 7 presses. I may just add up the total for a decked out 1050 and then see where the M7 comes in. And then show it to the wife. The big issue I'll have with the Mark 7 is the computer stuff. I'm not a fan of that. Unless I see one in use and can follow the programming. 

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