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Stafford

17 or 22 for USPSA

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Recently shot my first USPSA match and debated which pistol to use. Originally planned to shoot Production with my 17, but after some reading, I realized that Production isn’t really an “entry level” class due to the number of mag changes. I also would have had to purchase additional pouches. So, I decided to go with the Limited class and shoot either the 17 for Minor or my 22 for Major. I’m more accurate at slow fire with the 17 but not too far behind with the 22. I decided to shoot the 22 since I’m not the most accurate regardless and guessed I would score higher with the .40 caliber.

 

As it turned out, my slowness in running the stages hurt me more than my accuracy, though that wasn’t great either. So, now I’m thinking I’ll try shooting Limited Minor next time out with the 17 and see if I can go faster but be more accurate. Don’t know if it will make that much a difference versus giving up Major scoring. My gut tells me to just stick with the 22 because of the scoring. Both guns are stock. Any opinions welcome.

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It is not going to matter for a few matches regardless, but if you want to stick with limited, make sure any go fast parts you buy are for compatible with the 22, cause that is where you will end up.  I know many things are interchangeable, but if it ain't, get it for the 22

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What percentage of points did you shoot? I think somewhere between 88% and 92% would be a good goal to tell whether you need to speed up or slow down to meet those numbers.

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IMO, neither is optimal for limited when it comes to actually wining div HOA. But, you don't need to go out and buy/change any guns/gear for a good while. I'd recommend shooting the one you like more until you get to B class. Then it might make a little more sense to buy something new. Like a 35 and set it up for limited. Though, you may also decide to switch to production.  

 

 

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I'd recommend shooting the one you like more until you get to B class.


This is good advice, the gun is almost irrelevant as long as it works until much, much higher than B Class.

Though, you may also decide to switch to production.


Production will force you to develop your stage planning and gun handling skills a bit faster than Limited. That can be a good or bad thing based on your slant.

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Posted (edited)

It doesn’t matter which gun you use.

 

How fast you shoot isn’t where you pick up the pace when you’re new. You need to run instead of stroll, have the gun up when you get there instead of arrive then push out, keep it up on small movements, reload faster, and transition from target to target faster.

 

I’d suggest the 9 largely because you’re more comfortable with it and you’ll save money on ammo while learning to do all of the above in your first months of shooting USPSA.

 

 

Edited by MemphisMechanic

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Posted (edited)

My preference is to stick with the 22 because of the Major scoring and it’s the caliber to use in Limited. If I didn’t own a .40 S&W, then I wouldn’t go out and buy one, but since I have it....

 

As for running, I can do that. But I was a bit focused on not DQ’ing more than going fast. My main goal first time out was to finish all the stages.

Edited by Stafford

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I believe you should just purchase more mag pouches and shoot production. The 17 is perfect for that division and the additional mag changes will become easier after practicing and shooting a few matches.  A 17 in Limited is a distinct disadvantage because you’ll be scored minor. The 22, I think you might find, is going to be difficult to shoot well because of its lightness and the major power factor. Hope this helps. 

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3 minutes ago, dapribek said:

I believe you should just purchase more mag pouches and shoot production. The 17 is perfect for that division and the additional mag changes will become easier after practicing and shooting a few matches.  A 17 in Limited is a distinct disadvantage because you’ll be scored minor. The 22, I think you might find, is going to be difficult to shoot well because of its lightness and the major power factor. Hope this helps. 

 

That makes sense in a way. Additional mag pouches + shooting 9mm is the cheapest way to go, which is very important to me. However, I don’t like stage planning. Maybe someday I will, but I just want to shoot and not worry about when to drop a mag more than once or twice, and making sure to do it on the run, etc...

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Shoot the 17 in Limited, you will pick up the capacity especially if you add a couple extended pads, have cheaper ammo, and really the 22 isnt gonna be competitive anyways, and you have a ways to go before major scoring is gonna make much of a difference.

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1 hour ago, B_RAD said:

You don't need to go out and buy/change any guns/gear for a good while. I'd recommend shooting the one you like more until you get to B class. Then it might make a little more sense to buy something new. Like a 35 and set it up for limited. Though, you may also decide to switch to production.

 

1 hour ago, RJH said:

It is not going to matter for a few matches regardless, but if you want to stick with limited, make sure any go fast parts you buy are for compatible with the 22, cause that is where you will end up.  I know many things are interchangeable, but if it ain't, get it for the 22 

 

These both contain the advice I would give. Start saving money for a reloading setup for either caliber if you don't have it already. A basic Dillon setup will run about $550 and pay for itself over factory in a year or two.

 

If avoiding detailed stage plans and multiple reloads is still your goal in a couple months you could consider a $180 optic cut slide for your 17, a $350 optic, and a pair of $40 mag extensions to run in Carry Optics. All your existing Production gear would transfer over, though 5 mag pouches won't be necessary.

If you really like Limited and major PF, then a magwell at $70, a frame weight <$50, and a sight block on a glock 35 barrel for ~$140 would create a pretty competitive limited gun out of your 22. Competitive enough to win local match divisions, and by the time it's holding you back the cost of a new gun won't be very significant.

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Keep in mind that much of what is said here about the competitiveness of the pistols and calibers is mostly relevant to people who are at the top or very near the top of this sport. My last local match had 7 pistols shooting minor above the first Limited Major pistol. There is no reason to stress over the pistol when starting out. Limited Minor is fine for now.

 

Do you have good sights in the pistol? I shot stock Glock sights for way too long.

 

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6 minutes ago, OdinIII said:

Keep in mind that much of what is said here about the competitiveness of the pistols and calibers is mostly relevant to people who are at the top or very near the top of this sport. My last local match had 7 pistols shooting minor above the first Limited Major pistol. There is no reason to stress over the pistol when starting out. Limited Minor is fine for now.

 

Do you have good sights in the pistol? I shot stock Glock sights for way too long.

 

 

My 17 has the stock sights with the back blacked out with a Sharpie. I have some money to spend,  but I hate spending money on hobbies until I’m all in. 

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I know how it feels to over analyze everything. I’m setting up a G34 for carry optics and keep thinking I should try a G17 for a backup just so I can try the shorter slide. My own advice from above tells me that it doesn’t matter and I should just get another G34 but it isn’t easy when there is the possibility of not making the best choice.

Good luck, my scores didn’t noticeably improve but I very much enjoyed shooting the Dawson Fiber Optic sights more.

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Seems like the most practical thing to do is: shoot Limited Minor with the 17, add sights, get a belt/holster set up/get extra mag pouches/ learn with every match, and then move to Production. And 2 years later, decide what type of Limited gun I want to shoot.

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Buy some of Steve Anderson’s or Ben Stoeger’s dryfire books and start listening to Steve and Ben’s podcast. Read the books and “get to work!” This will advance your classification faster than spending $3000 on a new 2011! The magic in this sport is in the person, not the equipment.

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Spending 3,000 on a 2011 is so far out of my range of thinking, that I can’t conceive. I would gradually add $800 to my G22 first before considering a 2011. Just my way of thinking. And that’s only after shooting the 17 for a while with Minor scoring. And then adding a magwell and a -connector to the 22. I’m cheap, and I realize that I have a lot of room for improvement before buying a competition gun. 

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I spent my first year shooting a Browning Hi-Power (invented in 1935)     🐢

 

Shooting an ancient 9mm, in Limited  …..    :eatdrink:

 

Why ?   Because that's what I owned and it had 13 round mags.    :)

 

I had a BLAST.   I wasn't going to win anyway, but I had a Lot of Fun

with that gun.

 

Shoot your 9mm until you decide that the gun is holding you back,

instead of your shooting and moving,

and by that time, you will know exactly what you want.

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Good choice to go with the 22 or the 17. Both are ultra reliable. Use the one you have more confidence in and build from there as far as the speed element. 

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I would probably just shoot the 17 in limited for now, until you get the hang of the sport and figure out what you really want to do.  They skills learned over that time period will transfer to anything you decide on.  

 

 

 

(B class Production shooting a G17)

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My guess is that I'll either continue to shoot the 17 and move to production, or I'll add some things to the G22 and stay in limited.

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