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anonymouscuban

Slapping the Trigger Like it Owes Me Money

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I've been shooting doubles lately to work on my splits and accuracy. I decided to video my grip and such to see why my groups aren't where I want them to be.

 

Good news is my grip is solid. Gun and hands move as one. My wrists are good and elbows are also good. Stance seems right.

 

Bad news is when I'm shooting fast splits, I'm slapping the crap out of the trigger. I don't have this issue when I slow things down. I think this is causing some of my issues.

 

Can you guys recommend some drills to work on this issue?

 

 

 

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Relax your strong hang a bit. Probably getting a sympathetic movement when you pull the trigger cause of over gripping the gun with the strong hand. Slapping the trigger is not really a problem,  moving the gun when you do it is

 

 

Also make sure you are actually getting 2 sight pictures

Edited by RJH

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Slap it all you want as long as you keep the gun still during trigger press.  That takes practice, a lot of which can be gotten in dry fire, which you don't mention.

You have a solid grip, that's a great start.  Maybe just a little more emphasis on keeping it solid as you slap is all you need.  Or, tame the slap a bit if that's what's needed.

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You can do the dry fire drill you are already doing along with dry fire bill drills with sight movement being the focus of the drill. You can incorporate any dry fire drill that involves a fast trigger press, just put an emphasis into eliminating sight movement while slapping the trigger. In live fire you can work on the dot drill (two inch dot at 7 yards, 5 second par. Draw and fire six shots). 

 

If you want fast splits you are going to have to slap the trigger. Learning how much trigger discipline you need for various target difficulties is what you should focus on in live fire. 

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Hey thanks for all the helpful advice. I got busy the last couple of days and couldn't reply.

So I do quite a bit of dry fire. Everyday. Many days i do multiple sessions. Also doing live fire at least once per week.

I run a DA/SA gun. SP-01 to be specific. In dry fire what I normally do is my initial DA pull with the draw and then just acquire sight picture with no press. Alternatively, i will sometime pin my hammer back with a hair tie and then i will do trigger presses on all targets. Its simulated SA pretty closely with the trigger pinned back. Not sure if this makes sense.

I don't see a lot of sight movement, if any when I'm dry fire. However, I'm going to make sure I'm keeping myself honest in dry fire when I'm working on faster splits and transitions. I may be moving the sight more than I'd like to think.

I'm gonna hit the range tomorrow and wear my hat cam. I only shot video from the side . The fortunate thing is that my grip appears to be good. The trigger guard is not separating from support hand index finger. My hands and gun are moving as one unit. Wrists seems pretty locked. Muzzle is not dipping down when the gun returns and I fire the next shot.

Now what I did notice is that I'm moving back a little with it shot. More than I'd like. My the end of a 10 shot string, my nose and muzzle are about an inch, maybe a tad more further back than where I started. Now, this was at an indoor range and my shooting tends to always be worse than when I shoot outdoors I always feel cramped. Can never quite get in my natural shooting stance. I also can't see my sights worth a damn because the lighting sucks.

Like I said, will try some drills tomorrow with the side cam and a POV cam. I can then really see what my muzzle and sights are doing in slow-mo during live fire.

I'm gonna shoot again on Thursday but outdoors. See if my performance is any different.

I will let you guys know how it goes and I will post up some of the video.

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

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I slap, jerk whatever trigger but as long as i have a solid tight grip it always goes back to where i aimed at. 

 

 

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20 hours ago, anonymouscuban said:

Hey thanks for all the helpful advice. I got busy the last couple of days and couldn't reply.

So I do quite a bit of dry fire. Everyday. Many days i do multiple sessions. Also doing live fire at least once per week.

I run a DA/SA gun. SP-01 to be specific. In dry fire what I normally do is my initial DA pull with the draw and then just acquire sight picture with no press. Alternatively, i will sometime pin my hammer back with a hair tie and then i will do trigger presses on all targets. Its simulated SA pretty closely with the trigger pinned back. Not sure if this makes sense.

I don't see a lot of sight movement, if any when I'm dry fire. However, I'm going to make sure I'm keeping myself honest in dry fire when I'm working on faster splits and transitions. I may be moving the sight more than I'd like to think.

I'm gonna hit the range tomorrow and wear my hat cam. I only shot video from the side . The fortunate thing is that my grip appears to be good. The trigger guard is not separating from support hand index finger. My hands and gun are moving as one unit. Wrists seems pretty locked. Muzzle is not dipping down when the gun returns and I fire the next shot.

Now what I did notice is that I'm moving back a little with it shot. More than I'd like. My the end of a 10 shot string, my nose and muzzle are about an inch, maybe a tad more further back than where I started. Now, this was at an indoor range and my shooting tends to always be worse than when I shoot outdoors I always feel cramped. Can never quite get in my natural shooting stance. I also can't see my sights worth a damn because the lighting sucks.

Like I said, will try some drills tomorrow with the side cam and a POV cam. I can then really see what my muzzle and sights are doing in slow-mo during live fire.

I'm gonna shoot again on Thursday but outdoors. See if my performance is any different.

I will let you guys know how it goes and I will post up some of the video.

Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
 

 

So maybe I missed it, but what does the target look like when you slap the s#!t out of the trigger to get your fastest splits?  And at what distance?

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I struggled with the same thing .... dryfiring really helped me.... so my recommendation is dryfire,  dryfire,  and more dryfire 

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Slap, jerk, press, squeeze or pull all you want. But, work on front sight focus and shot calling. It's all there....

 

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Slapping it isn’t bad if you’re getting the hits you need.

 

Are you getting the hits you need on the targets you’re throwing quick pairs at?

 

Also. Are you calling your second shot? Do you know where it went?

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Everybody slaps the trigger. The key is to slap, press, pull, yank, whatever you want to call it with out disrupting the sights. Rob Leatham I think said it best in this video. 

 

 

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