Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!
keonard

Improving Trigger. Drill to keep hand steady while mashing trigger??

Recommended Posts

Posted (edited)

I'm doing a drill now that has me aim gun and when beep sounds pull trigger as fast as I can and watch for sight movement.  I still get some movement from time to time and I believe it has to do with "milking" the gun or when you move your trigger finger, the whole hand flexes just enough to cause sight movement.  Anyone have a different drill that worked for them to separate trigger finger movement from twitching hand?  My grip is good.  I feel it has a little to do with hand tension, but it's not always consistent.

EDIT:  when I do my drill above, I do NOT rest finger on trigger, rather it is off the trigger to simulate real life fast shooting.  

Edited by keonard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check out stoeger’s Dry Fire exercises. He has that particular drill in his book Dry Fire reloaded. I practice it daily as part of my Dry Fire routine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, George16 said:

Check out stoeger’s Dry Fire exercises. He has that particular drill in his book Dry Fire reloaded. I practice it daily as part of my Dry Fire routine.

That's where I got my current drill from.  He has the best stuff that I've seen to date.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm doing a drill now that has me aim gun and when beep sounds pull trigger as fast as I can and watch for sight movement.  I still get some movement from time to time and I believe it has to do with "milking" the gun or when you move your trigger finger, the whole hand flexes just enough to cause sight movement.  Anyone have a different drill that worked for them to separate trigger finger movement from twitching hand?  My grip is good.  I feel it has a little to do with hand tension, but it's not always consistent.
EDIT:  when I do my drill above, I do NOT rest finger on trigger, rather it is off the trigger to simulate real life fast shooting.  
hand tension and wrist tension are two separate entities. Lock your wrist but relax your right to just hold the gun gently between your fingers. Don't monkey grip the gun with your dominant hand. You're dominant wrist being locked will control the muzzle rise.

Lock your support hand wrist 100% but again don't smash your fingers against the strong hand. Wrists will lift and allow gun to return back to zero if stance is good

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/23/2019 at 8:56 PM, Rnlinebacker said:

hand tension and wrist tension are two separate entities. Lock your wrist but relax your right to just hold the gun gently between your fingers. Don't monkey grip the gun with your dominant hand. You're dominant wrist being locked will control the muzzle rise.

Lock your support hand wrist 100% but again don't smash your fingers against the strong hand. Wrists will lift and allow gun to return back to zero if stance is good

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

Yes, one of the big takeaways from Hwansik's recoil video

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, one of the big takeaways from Hwansik's recoil video
he's a scientist with the minute details he gets into. thanked him personally at area 6 for helping me tremendously

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try using a metronome (real or app) and press the trigger in time with the beats. One you get the BPM up high enough, you'll need to be moving your trigger finger really fast to keep up with it and you will see any "milking" of the grip or other movement show up after a few seconds.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Try dry firing with no pressure.  Take as much time as you need to drop the hammer (or striker) without moving the sights.

 

With repetition you will train the fingers, hands and eyes on accomplishing that task - dropping the hammer without disturbing the sight picture.  Once that is a "natural" state of pulling the trigger, add the stress factors like dropping the hammer on demand - still emphasizing not disturbing the sight picture.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You must already be a student of dry fire or you wouldn't have Stoeger's Dry Fire Reloaded book.  So you are probably on the verge of working it out.  Maybe more attention to it in your live fire - dry fire feedback loop and you're there.  For me it was getting the right balance of relaxed trigger finger and firm enough support hand grip.  This might not make sense but certain things settled in for me when I started doing more draws into WHO followed by six or more fast trigger presses.  The rapid weak hand trigger presses seemed to make something click that transferred over to normal two-hand (freestyle) shooting at speed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think this drill is not meant to have the perfect trigger pull. It´s for Kind of "slapping" the trigger without moving the sights. Goal is to have zero movement. That should be no easy task and I think if you achive that most the time, you are doing good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What I did many years ago to improve my trigger pull was to make it as difficult as possible. I got a Daisy 1911 BB pistol. Absolute WORST trigger you can imagine. 1/2" pull at around 8 lbs and felt like rubbing two bricks together. Practice like that until you can keep the sights on the center of the target through the entire pull. Once you get to that point, your competition pistol is gonna be a dream.

 

I have always believed in making practice as hard as possible. It should be real work. Then the match is easy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...