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How often do you train? Poll.


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My only training is shooting local matches.  I try to shoot two to three a month when not in the winter months.  I know it's not really training, but it's as close to training as I do.  That's why I'm stuck in high B in Carry Optics, Production and SS, could probably get to A with a minor amount of practice.  But it's just not that big of a deal for me. 

Edited by JGus
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On 6/18/2020 at 3:28 PM, JGus said:

.. could probably get to A with a minor amount of practice.  But it's just not that big of a deal for me. 


Im kind of in the same boat.. Ide like to think im willing to dryfire a bit each day - and I know thats the only way out of B class -  but it just doesn't seem to happen. I feel so dirty

 

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8 hours ago, scroadkill said:


Im kind of in the same boat.. Ide like to think im willing to dryfire a bit each day - and I know thats the only way out of B class -  but it just doesn't seem to happen. I feel so dirty

 

 

Ditto. In the past I told myself I'd dry fire, and that lasted for about a week.  Just got too bored with it and found too many other things to distract myself.

 

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Never.  Of course I've been averaging 2-3 matches a year as of late. May not shoot any this year.

 

But back when I was shooting 3-4 matches a month all year long, the answer was... never. ;) 

Edited by cas
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Thank God we just got the news today that 'indoor sports' will be allowed again from 1st of July. (Netherlands) and this includes shooting sports, which is almost exclusively indoors in the Netherlands. And without restrictions when actually on the range!  

So back to business, which means two times per week live-fire (normally static drills on one day, and the other day, playing around building stages and having fun)

and normally I was doing dry-fire two to three times a week, but during this COVID-nightmare, I haven't been able to find the motivation, unfortunately.....

Edited by WFargo
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  • 3 weeks later...
On 4/16/2019 at 7:58 PM, BamaShooter88 said:

I’m bored and started wondering. I thought it would be cool to see where everyone stands. I’m new to competition shooting. I’m working on a training program. So I was wondering. What class did you start out in, what class are you in now, how long did it take you to get there, how often do you train and how do you train? 

 

Started in C class in Production in the fall of 2014.  Hit four matches that year, then no USPSA until the fall of 2015 again four more matches.  I had a CZ 75BD, tuned it with Cajun parts and bought a belt rig from the Stoeger pro shop, but then set it aside as I was still heavily into chasing tournaments in sporting clays. 

 

Burned out on clay shooting in the summer of 2018 and decided to try pistols again.  I found out that I sucked and sucked badly.  So I buckled down on a dry/live fire training program over the winter.  Dry fire was 4 to 5 nights a week for about 30 min each session.  Live fired once or twice a week.  Later in that year I bought a CZ P-09, tuned it up, and that became the pistol I shot all through the winter of 2018 and into next season.

 

I hit nineteen matches in 2019 and made B class in Production about midway through the year.  I scaled back the dry firing to only 2 - 3  nights a week and kept up the live fire practice at about 1 - 2  times a week.  Each live fire session was dedicated to one or two skills and burned through 150 - 200 rounds. 

 

In late 2019 I bought a CZ P-10F Optics Ready and an RMR to try carry optics.  I spent the last month or so of 2019 trying to get used to that pistol (getting used to the dot took very little) and in about March of 2020 I decided to send my P-09's slide to get milled for Trijicon.  I got my first Carry Optics classification as C class in early May with the P-10.  After some back and forth I abandoned the P-10 in mid May and went back to the P-09 for Carry Optics and made B class almost immediately by going to an all classifier match at the end of May.

 

Nowadys my dry fire and live fire is structured to work on the things I sucked at the last match.  Lately that has been port entries.  So I made a port with a target stand, two sticks, and a big piece of cardboard with a rectangular hole and for the last two weeks I've been doing those in my dry fire dojo in the basement.  Today I took that setup to my gun club and burned 200 rounds on different variations of port entries to easy and hard targets.

 

So there I am............

Edited by SGT_Schultz
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  • 4 weeks later...

I have lofty goals to be sure but I wind up doing dry fire practice twice a week, and live fire maybe once every other week down from 2-3x a week before the ammo buying panic started.

 

It doesn't help that 9mm ammo has gotten silly expensive and components are not available (besides the fact I do not like loading 9's) because they are likely being sucked up by ammo makers to take advantage of the buying panic price increases. 

 

I'm waiting on using any of my stash / hoard .40 ammo and components until I can start / finish my Tanfo .40 open build then I'll be in good stead and be able to get up to speed when / if the county allows matches.

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 months later...

I get out to the range for practice at least once a week.  If I can I try to get two practice sessions in.  Since I shoot both IDPA and USPSA I usually bring out multiple guns for practice and around 300 rounds.

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I practice at L1 matches.. cause I like shooting matches - and cant stand dry fire or otherwise wasting primers.

Zero or Hero Mode: I practice taking the high risky / aggressive plans, stupid shots, way out of the way positions, and complete opposite of everyone else just to see how different things work - to know my limits and to know where the risk/reward works and doesn't work. and this is just so much fun.  zero or hero or stage at a time.

Match Mode: I'll shoot for no mikes - see both of the sights lift - call all shots before leaving. Kind of boring.. but ok.

Speed Mode: don't worry about mikes - just focus on moving hard - again learning my limits and risk/reward.

as L2 matches approach Ill stay in Match Mode for about a month before hand then at least start the L2 match in Match Mode.

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  • 3 months later...

I've been stuck in B class hell for two years now, and it recently occurred to me that this just MIGHT be due to lack of practice.  Since December I've been dry firing 6 days a week, sometimes with a morning and an afternoon session if I feel like I'm losing focus.  That's equating to almost an hour of training per day. Unfortunately I can only get to the range about once a week so I try to maximize that time.

 

While I still haven't escaped B yet, I'm within 2% of doing so AND I've been winning matches against shooters who should be better on paper.  Additionally, my confidence and mental preparation is much better, which is allowing me to take risky shots at a faster pace than I normally would.  Does it really matter if I get out of B?  Maybe not.  It would be a nice recognition of the work I've been putting in.

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12 hours ago, UpYoursPal said:

I've been stuck in B class hell for two years now, and it recently occurred to me that this just MIGHT be due to lack of practice.  Since December I've been dry firing 6 days a week, sometimes with a morning and an afternoon session if I feel like I'm losing focus.  That's equating to almost an hour of training per day. Unfortunately I can only get to the range about once a week so I try to maximize that time.

 

While I still haven't escaped B yet, I'm within 2% of doing so AND I've been winning matches against shooters who should be better on paper.  Additionally, my confidence and mental preparation is much better, which is allowing me to take risky shots at a faster pace than I normally would.  Does it really matter if I get out of B?  Maybe not.  It would be a nice recognition of the work I've been putting in.

if you put in the right time, energy, training, techniques, passion and self image, you'll improve! Don't let go! If not done yet, check out Steve Anderson, Ben Stoeger and JJ Racaza trainings and online coaching ...

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  • 4 weeks later...

Starting with desired outcomes and expectations of what you want out of USPSA will really help you map out your training and resource plan.  For most of us, we ain't making money or winning nats.  If your goal is to be locally competitive in ___ class, such as A as a B shooter, then 1 hour of training a day is plenty.  Related but a little different is moving up in class; moving up once you hit A and beyond, it is a lot about 'gaming' the classification system in that you have to carefully watch when you can get to a classifier match and the specific classifier you'll get access to at your weekly matches.  Still, 1 hour I think would be plenty for that goal as well.

 

For being competitive at matches, I would take a hard look at your videos and doing a thorough analysis after each match.  As a B shooter beating higher classed shooters, you most likely already know and understand all the 'gaming' parts of USPSA.  The specific goal of a training session or training plan is to close gaps - i.e what is your A to non-A ratio, are you stronger at speed courses with lots of close targets or stages that reward accuracy, are you beating folks on raw time but losing in HF, etc.  

 

I could go on for a while so please hit me up or post if you have any follow on questions.

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I started out as a U, doesn't everyone?   My rise to B took about 3 years.  During that time I dry fired, wet fired, and shot 4 to 8 local matches a month.  I could knock out a classifier no problem but it was the match performance, that didn't fit my class.

 

I would say I was doing the same thing I see a lot of people doing, trying to shoot faster, and my transitions and splits were good and the draw etc.  But that's when I started to look at the real things I should be working on.   USPSA unlike steel challenge involves movement and positioning. Once I started working on the golden rule, "It is not how fast you get there, it is how fast you get there ready to shoot".  In short the first shot when you move into the next position (box) should go off at the instant your trailing foot enters the box. (No squat head tucking or hunting for the target) You had gun up eyes on target in the last step.   Then there is positioning that spot you landed in does it give you the most possible targets in the array?  An inch in either direction makes a huge difference in your time.   Then there is the smooth factor, a charging Rhino is actually slower than a Gazelle. 

 

12 years later after a 4 year break I'm starting over, and that is what it feels like.  My wet practice is Steel Challenge, instant feed back, and a great way to build accuracy at speed.  When I first started I practiced on plate racks, wish I had one now. I dry fire, draw to first shot, and do reloads about 30 minutes during the week prior to any match.

 

Any training plan should include all of the skills required from platform to movement and positioning.  And there is nothing worse than a slow miss. 

 

Edited by CocoBolo
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During lead up to a major match I dry fire a minimum once a day for 45 minutes. I also am a firm believer in burn out. I take several breaks throughout the season if I have more than a month until the next major match. I also find when I come back I have significantly more breakthroughs in my performance than when I'm just continually grinding day in and day out. I went from U-A in 2 months A-M in 3 months. Now competing at the legit M level. I think live fire has it's place but due to budget and time constraints being in college I usually only live fire 2-3 times a month and never more than 150 rounds. Live fire to me should be about building relationship with your gun's recoil. Dry fire is where the handling and precision is learned.

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Practice twice a week.  Try to get to 2-4 USPSA matches a month.  Have a "practice set" for Steel Challenge and try to get that out at least once a week or go to a range that has some stages already setup. 

 

Limitation now is reloading components.  Can make it through the 2021 season but if things keep drying up or stay at their outrageous prices, I'll find something other than USPSA to do.  Probably SC as I have enough ammo and the equipment for both RFPO and RFRO. 

 

BC

 

 

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When I stopped dry fire practice I lost the match expectations that can be frustrating and got back to the 'fun day with the folks at the range' mindset that taught me to enjoy the shooting sports in the first place. Whatever makes you happy. 

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My first classification was a C Class in Limited. I started out with my CZ 75B Omega and saw some guys shooting PCC and figured I’d give it a shot. I just recently moved up to master class in PCC after about a year of competition shooting. Moving to open here soon! I rarely have time to train/dry fire. 

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