Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!
BamaShooter88

How often do you train? Poll.

Recommended Posts

shooting matches didn't make me better at shooting. but it did expose things i needed to work on and taught me how to be a competitor. the difference between shooting a stage and shooting a match. lots of learning things but no actual skill development.

 

any skill i've ever gained came through practice at the range or dry fire at home.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Made GM in about 30 months. Was in A class for about 6 months. 

 

Struggled to be a legit, competitive GM. 

 

Shot a LOT; probably 50k rounds her year, about 6 majors per year, about 36 club matches per year. 

 

Never really shot well at a major; came in 20th at the.....2005(?) limited nationals. 

 

Made GM in Production somewhere in there. M in SStck and L10.

 

Historically was "Last" GM everywhere I went. 

 

About 2010 petitioned USPSA to lower my classification down to M which they agreed to do. 

 

Took 2014-2015 or so off from shooting; came back in 2015 and have struggled getting back up to speed, and settling on a division. 

 

Currently shooting about 24k rounds per year, about two club matches a month, one major a year and dryfiring 7 days a week. Shoot a 100% on a classifier two months ago. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Started out in B class and made M in almost exactly one year.  Been in M for a year and now I'm getting really close to GM (94.3%).  I try to live fire once a week and dry fire for an hour 5 nights a week (usually ends up being more like 3 nights a week).  I feel like I get more out of dry firing than I do live fire just because I can get more reps in and it's more accessible.  Most of my dry fire is focused on gun handling; I work on movement a bit more during live fire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/18/2019 at 12:02 PM, Ssanders224 said:

I'm a terrible example. Don't be like me. 

 

I haven't dry fired in probably close to two years, and honestly (because of me and my wife having a baby) I haven't spent any time practicing in 8-10 months. 

I think I originally classified as M, and It took me about a year or year and half to make GM? That timeline could be a little off. 

 

About 85-90% of (my) shooting ability is somewhat like riding a bike, and doesn't take much to maintain.  However, that 10-15% is super critical, and is where the small nuances that it takes to win reside.  

 

Plus the fact that you’re like 6.5, could have played college ball and probably run the 40 in under 5.0 might have helped? 😂

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I’m no example but when I was shooting everything within 10hours every weekend I would work on foot speed away from the gun and fundamentals with the gun.  If you have the time and desire I suggest rotating your days. This way you won’t wear yourself (hands) out with only dryfire. 

 

Monday; do foot work and the regular agility drills with short sprints. 15 to 30 mins. 

Tuesday; dryfire 30mins

Wed; livefire. I usually shoot 3 to 400rds working on fundamentals and what I noticed in my match. 

Thurs; dryfire or agility drills 

Friday;  load for the weekends match and followings weeks livefire or if you feel good just do the opposite of what you did for Thursday’s training. 

Saturday; shoot a local, major match or livefire..

Sunday; chill. 

Disclaimer;  doing this with more likely than not will cause at least one of these 3 things to happen and maybe all 3 (as in my case).

1 cause a divorce

2 cause burn out

3 cause your to get damn good. 

 

Decide what’s best for your situation, develop a plan and do it. Even 15mins of dryfiring fundamentals 4 or 5 days a week will make a noticeable difference in your game.

Like anything and everything,  you will get out of it what you put into it. Good luck and stay safe. 

Edited by a matt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made the move over to PCC in May of this year, my initial classification was B, I made it to A in a couple of months as it stands now, I’m sitting at 84.26%. Before PCC, I was shooting single stack where I stopped at 68%. There just isn’t much interest in single stack locally, and I hated loading .45 and furthermore, I hated  reloading 4 to 5 times a stage. So I jumped to the complete opposite end of the spectrum. I try to dry fire 2-3 times a week for 20-30 minutes. I also do live fire practice once a week, shoot and outlaw USPSA type match, and a local every week. Dry fire, especially when I was shooting a pistol was the best thing that helped me improve (I use Refinement and Repetition by Steve Anderson)

 

side note: PCC has actually helped my pistol game a lot as I am preparing to move into CO next season. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What dryfire drills are yall using that you thought made the biggest difference?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/18/2019 at 11:02 AM, Ssanders224 said:

I'm a terrible example. Don't be like me. 

 

I haven't dry fired in probably close to two years, and honestly (because of me and my wife having a baby) I haven't spent any time practicing in 8-10 months. 

I think I originally classified as M, and It took me about a year or year and half to make GM? That timeline could be a little off. 

 

About 85-90% of (my) shooting ability is somewhat like riding a bike, and doesn't take much to maintain.  However, that 10-15% is super critical, and is where the small nuances that it takes to win reside.  

 

Just stumbled across this thread and saw your post.   What shooting did you do before USPSA?  Initially classifying at M is impressive

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Double tap

Edited by RJH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lately, just occasional halfhearted dry fire and two matches per month.  That's not enough.

 

I went from unclassified to high C in USPSA and Steel Challenge in something like a year and a half, to B in Steel Challenge in about two years.   And after a  stronger push in dry fire practice,  B in USPSA in about three years.

 

Getting to A and above will require a new level of training frequency, no way around it.

 

For the last year or so I've been on a plateau and I know the remedy is more frequent training.  I've been learning some finer points in Steel Challenge, some of which I can carry to USPSA and other shooting games, but those things give only fractional improvements.  Right now, it's about more energy output, better consistency, and elevating my skill level through more frequent training.  Some of the things I've improved through sheer reps aren't things I'm consciously aware of.  Lots of draws, trigger presses and reloads in dry fire along with steady match shooting definitely improve my match performance simply because I become capable of faster and more precise gun handling, more than any mental paradigm shift or technique change.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I try to dry fire 3/4 times a week.  Lucky to live fire once every two weeks.  I do a match almost weekly but I really don’t consider that training.  I need to become more efficient with my live fire because I just don’t get out as much as I’d like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the heat of the season, I live fire at least once a week, if I can get away with more I will. Sometimes even if it’s just on my lunch to run the plate rack for 30 minutes with SH/WH or transitions from outside to inside. I don’t dry fire like I should but am going to try this winter since our shooting dries up here in eastern WA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been shooting little under a year. First classes as C and just made B. Dry fire 3-4 times a week and least one live fire a month with two matches. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/15/2019 at 11:39 PM, NumberTwo said:

What dryfire drills are yall using that you thought made the biggest difference?

Fundamentals and where you notice you need to improve at matches. Try breaking each  (reloading - draws - transitions, whatever you choose) action down into several small movements. Then work on the small movements till you fell like got it then start stringing them together. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/3/2019 at 6:01 PM, a matt said:

Fundamentals and where you notice you need to improve at matches. Try breaking each  (reloading - draws - transitions, whatever you choose) action down into several small movements. Then work on the small movements till you fell like got it then start stringing them together. 

Do you have targets on the walls, that you use for dry fire?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with most guys dry fire has pushed me further ahead than anything.

But as one gentlemen put it above too much can lead to burnout or divorce so design it so you still enjoy it at the end of the day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...