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Beating a dead horse...nitride vs dlc?

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For those that have run your pistols hard for a few years, are you finding that one is holding up better than another?  I’m looking at a few custom builds a they both run different finishes.

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For those that have run your pistols hard for a few years, are you finding that one is holding up better than another?  I’m looking at a few custom builds a they both run different finishes.

“Nitride” is far too generic a term.

PVD (Physical Vapor Deposition) coatings come in many, many varieties of which W DLC is but one. There’s also TiAlN (Titanium Aluminum Nitride) and others.

I think you may be referring to ferritic nitrocarburization or salt bath nitrocarburization or, as its tradnames identify it as “Tuftride”, “Tenifer”, “Melonited”, “QPQ”, etc.

PVD is a COATING

The latter process is a SURFACE CONVERSION PROCESS.

I would coat a Melonited pistol with a PVD coating - like Glock has done with the 19X and Gen 5 pistols.

I cannot think of a more durable surface than that.


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Nitrocarb is very tough. But it will wear if you're rough on gear or do a whole lot of draws from a kydex holster.

 

PVD/CVD is a process not a type, whichever coating you choose will determine your results and color but many are tougher (and slicker) than nitrocarb.

 

DLC is even tougher and slicker and comes in lots of pretty colors (duplex stainless looks amazing without being gaudy).

 

Hard Chrome is also a good choice since unless you gouge the crap out of it you can just polish it out or re-beadblast for much less than a new coating.

 

If you are very rough on your stuff, learn to cerakote and just repaint as needed.

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Nitrocarb is very tough. But it will wear if you're rough on gear or do a whole lot of draws from a kydex holster.
 
PVD/CVD is a process not a type, whichever coating you choose will determine your results and color but many are tougher (and slicker) than nitrocarb.
 
DLC is even tougher and slicker and comes in lots of pretty colors (duplex stainless looks amazing without being gaudy).
 
Hard Chrome is also a good choice since unless you gouge the crap out of it you can just polish it out or re-beadblast for much less than a new coating.
 
If you are very rough on your stuff, learn to cerakote and just repaint as needed.

Actually, nitrocarburization is the tougher, harder, more durable more salt water corrosion resistant of the two.

Putting DLC atop a nitrocarburized slide is the ticket.


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6 hours ago, Chui said:


Actually, nitrocarburization is the tougher, harder, more durable more salt water corrosion resistant of the two.

Putting DLC atop a nitrocarburized slide is the ticket.


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DLC is as hard or up to more than twice as hard as nitrocarb (depending on material used for coating) and also has a much, much lower coefficient of friction. Also DLC has similar corrosion resistance to nitrocarb and superior resistance when applied on top of nitrocarb. If you can find a peer-reviewed technical paper anywhere that says otherwise to these assertions, I'd be very interested to read it.

 

Depending on the materials and process used, a very broad interpretation of all the testing data I've seen is that coating durability/hardness go basically like this:  Cerakote > Parkerizing > Hard Chrome > Nitrocarb > PVD > DLC

 

This ignores surface treatments such as bluing and case hardening but we know exactly how durable those are from long experience. Better than nothing but not better than most coatings. For the money, a full park job polished out a bit with cerakote over it on the externals is enough for most people. Cheap, effective and easily repaired. But if you want harder and slicker, move up the list as your budget allows.

 

 

PS. Side note, I wonder why no one is using boriding in the gun market besides a few AR-15 bolt makers. Looks to be a better choice than hard chrome.

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Ferritic Nitrocarburization is a surface conversion process and is a surface hardening process.

I have some articles that I can email you.

CeraKote is just a paint. It’s not very good compared to Melonite/Tuftride/Tenifer (all Nitrocarburization tradenames, btw). Parkerizing is not as durable or corrosion resistant, either.

PVD coatings are thin film coatings and they are bonded but a small point load (a pointed nail) will cause the coating to fail.

Glock is smart: the Melonite then use PVD (in this case some form of DLC) on top of their slide.

That’s the best that I’m aware of at the moment.


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Would any of these finishes work on a extended shotgun magazine tube and not burn off?

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On 5/20/2019 at 5:13 AM, Chui said:

Ferritic Nitrocarburization is a surface conversion process and is a surface hardening process.

I have some articles that I can email you.

CeraKote is just a paint. It’s not very good compared to Melonite/Tuftride/Tenifer (all Nitrocarburization tradenames, btw). Parkerizing is not as durable or corrosion resistant, either.
 

 

Just a comment on Melonite/Tenifer etc pistol slides and visible wear - the nitrocarburizing itself is not black, just bright steel color. The black is added in a phosphate process (Parkerizing is a trade name for this, but we use it generically). The visible wear you see most of the time when one of these slides gets shiny spots is just the parkerizing wearing off; the nitrocarburized surface underneath is intact. I have brought a couple of my Glock slides back to looking new again by just degreasing and parkerizing the surface again, all the visible wear spots disappear. 

 

Nitride and nitrocarburizing are often used in industrial applications without a black surface treatment added; those are not visually obvious. Some Porsche crankshafts are treated that way, for example.

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