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Sight picture with loaded handgun


Jlr99
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I have only shot a handful of USPSA events so I am still a new guy. My question is this: Am I allowed to take a sight picture after I load and make ready but before I holster the weapon to start the stage?

 

My routine or habit so far has been to load a magazine and chamber a round and punch out a single time for a sight picture. Then slowly holster the pistol, move a magazine to the front pouch and put hands at sides.

 

I just want to change this routine if it is against the rules before I get DQed. Thanks.

 

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I have only shot a handful of USPSA events so I am still a new guy. My question is this: Am I allowed to take a sight picture after I load and make ready but before I holster the weapon to start the stage?
 
My routine or habit so far has been to load a magazine and chamber a round and punch out a single time for a sight picture. Then slowly holster the pistol, move a magazine to the front pouch and put hands at sides.
 
I just want to change this routine if it is against the rules before I get DQed. Thanks.
 
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There is no rush after the make ready command. As a fellow competitor, please take your time to be best PREPARED to have your best possible run.

Take a few sight pictures and maybe a draw or two. The final step should be loading of the mag and to chamber a round. Take another sight picture if needed and do a final mental walkthrough if needed. If you're not going to be selfish with your time when it's finally your turn, then what's the point of paying and participating(resetting, scoring, stage building if applicable, etc)?

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If I take a sight picture I like to do it with an unloaded gun.  Just omits one possible mistake.  And realistically is there any difference between an unloaded vs loaded sight picture.

But in answer to your question, in USPSA it is legal.  In other disciplines it may not be and some clubs may frown on it.

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10 minutes ago, Jlr99 said:

 

I have only shot a handful of USPSA events so I am still a new guy. My question is this: Am I allowed to take a sight picture after I load and make ready but before I holster the weapon to start the stage?

 

My routine or habit so far has been to load a magazine and chamber a round and punch out a single time for a sight picture. Then slowly holster the pistol, move a magazine to the front pouch and put hands at sides.

 

I just want to change this routine if it is against the rules before I get DQed. Thanks.

 

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No rule against it. You should probably get familiar with the entire rulebook but definitely look at chapter 10.5 (Match Disqualification – Unsafe Gun Handling). That section will tell you what you could get sent home for.

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8.7.1 A competitor is permitted to take a sight picture prior to the start signal. Such sight picture is only permitted no more than one step from the “Make Ready” location.

 

No mention of whether the gun has been loaded or not. However, I would take care to make sure the finger is well outside of the trigger guard.

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21 minutes ago, Jlr99 said:

 

I have only shot a handful of USPSA events so I am still a new guy. My question is this: Am I allowed to take a sight picture after I load and make ready but before I holster the weapon to start the stage?

 

My routine or habit so far has been to load a magazine and chamber a round and punch out a single time for a sight picture. Then slowly holster the pistol, move a magazine to the front pouch and put hands at sides.

 

I just want to change this routine if it is against the rules before I get DQed. Thanks.

 

Sent from my VS996 using Tapatalk

 

 

 

Yes, it is allowed and is common.  

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I have read the rule book. And the subsection in chapter 8. I was asked not to do it during a non official USPSA style event so I just wanted to make sure I hadn't been getting away with anything I shouldn't be. Thank you for all the responses.

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it is legal in uspsa, but not legal in IPSC. I personally don't do it, and would never do it, but I like to actually do nice controlled trigger press and drop the hammer at Make Ready. Then I put the mag in, chamber a round and holster.

Thank you for the comments. I'm not asking you to do it. I am asking if it is legal. Personally I would never draw a handgun out of the holster and pull the trigger unless I was ready to shoot because any other time except on the uspsa range that gun will be chambered and ready to fire. To each their own. Don't try to make a moral argument out of my procedure.

 

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48 minutes ago, Jlr99 said:

Thank you for the comments. I'm not asking you to do it. I am asking if it is legal. Personally I would never draw a handgun out of the holster and pull the trigger unless I was ready to shoot because any other time except on the uspsa range that gun will be chambered and ready to fire. To each their own. Don't try to make a moral argument out of my procedure.

 

 

 

lol, I did tell you whether it was legal, but i'm not making a moral argument, I'm making a competitive argument. I believe it is a competitive advantage to drop the hammer on a good sight picture at make ready. That's why I do it.

 

How I treat my carry gun has pretty much nothing to do with how i treat racing, just like how I ride my dirtbike in an enduro has pretty much nothing to do with how I commute to work. One is racing, the other is daily living.

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Thank you for the comments. I'm not asking you to do it. I am asking if it is legal. Personally I would never draw a handgun out of the holster and pull the trigger unless I was ready to shoot because any other time except on the uspsa range that gun will be chambered and ready to fire. To each their own. Don't try to make a moral argument out of my procedure.  
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[emoji2955][emoji2955][emoji2955][emoji2955][emoji58][emoji58][emoji58][emoji58]

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I can't decipher emoji. But thanks for contributing to thr discussion.

 

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Don't get the whole triggered moral argument part of your statement. However, you're a noob to the sport so I get the ultra safety/tacticool aspect.

 

It's a game and not real life. Trigger pull on empty chamber is just fine as you're trying to prepare to do your absolute best on a stage. Trust yourself, guns don't shoot on their own.

 

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Ahh, ok. I get what you are saying. I understand it is a sport. I'm not try to make it something it isn't. At this time I prefer not to draw and pull the trigger on an unloaded pistol at load and make ready. Simple as that.

You do your way. I will do mine.

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4 minutes ago, Jlr99 said:

At this time I prefer not to draw and pull the trigger on an unloaded pistol at load and make ready. Simple as that.
 

which is totally cool, but allow me to elaborate. I draw the gun, rack the slide and observe that it is empty (thus cocking the hammer), and *then* pull the trigger and drop the hammer with a good sight picture (on a mini-popper, if one is available in my field of view).

 

I also don't like the idea of drawing and immediately pulling the trigger, and probably for the same reasons, so I just wanted to clarify exactly what I (and most good shooters) do.

Edited by motosapiens
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Ahh, ok. I get what you are saying. I understand it is a sport. I'm not try to make it something it isn't. At this time I prefer not to draw and pull the trigger on an unloaded pistol at load and make ready. Simple as that.

You do your way. I will do mine.

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IDPA are you trolling us [emoji23][emoji23][emoji23]

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which is totally cool, but allow me to elaborate. I draw the gun, rack the slide and observe that it is empty (thus cocking the hammer), and *then* pull the trigger and drop the hammer with a good sight picture (on a mini-popper, if one is available in my field of view).
 
I also don't like the idea of drawing and immediately pulling the trigger, and probably for the same reasons, so I just wanted to clarify exactly what I (and most good shooters) do.
I figured that was what you meant after reading it again. And I have seen much better shooters than I do similar prep to what you are explaining.

I just wanted to make sure I wasn't going to get kicked out of a match doing what I do. It may change down the road but at this time it is my routine that I feel confident with before a stage.

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IDPA are you trolling us [emoji23][emoji23][emoji23]

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I will be honest. All I know about IDPA is that you draw from "concealment" and they tell you what order to shoot targets in. Neither of those aspects sound appealing to me personally.

I'm not even sure that is true but I've heard guys on here say it when talking smack about IDPA.

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2 hours ago, motosapiens said:

I also don't like the idea of drawing and immediately pulling the trigger, and probably for the same reasons

 

I'm assuming you're referring to a DA/SA since for anything else the striker/hammer will be down when "Make Ready" is called and pulling the trigger will do nothing. May I ask what your reasoning for this is? Are you're concerned that you somehow ended up with a live round in the chamber since you visited the safety table/your last unload and show clear and you'll fire a shot when you dry fire at the first target?

 

Racking the slide first and then taking a sight picture may prevents a spook from an unanticipated discharge, but you're getting DQ'd either way (10.5.13 for having a loaded firearm at any time when not specifically allowed by the RO or 10.4.3 for ND during Make Ready), so why not use the start sequence to accurately mimic what you will do what the buzzer goes off for real? 

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1 hour ago, regor said:

 

I'm assuming you're referring to a DA/SA since for anything else the striker/hammer will be down when "Make Ready" is called and pulling the trigger will do nothing. May I ask what your reasoning for this is? Are you're concerned that you somehow ended up with a live round in the chamber since you visited the safety table/your last unload and show clear and you'll fire a shot when you dry fire at the first target?

 

Racking the slide first and then taking a sight picture may prevents a spook from an unanticipated discharge, but you're getting DQ'd either way (10.5.13 for having a loaded firearm at any time when not specifically allowed by the RO or 10.4.3 for ND during Make Ready), so why not use the start sequence to accurately mimic what you will do what the buzzer goes off for real? 

 

I don't see any point in mimicking what i will do when the buzzer goes off for real. my subconscious already handles that. I just like to remind my conscious mind to call acceptable shots.

 

I'm just in the habit of verifying my gun is empty before I pull the trigger when I expect it to be empty. I check before every dryfire session too. It's not really about reasoning, it's just my habit.

Edited by motosapiens
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15 minutes ago, motosapiens said:

 

I don't see any point in mimicking what i will do when the buzzer goes off for real. my subconscious already handles that. I just like to remind my conscious mind to call acceptable shots.

 

I'm just in the habit of verifying my gun is empty before I pull the trigger when I expect it to be empty. I check before every dryfire session too. It's not really about reasoning, it's just my habit.

 

I do the same

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  • 2 weeks later...
On ‎3‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 1:50 PM, Jlr99 said:

Personally I would never draw a handgun out of the holster and pull the trigger unless I was ready to shoot because any other time except on the uspsa range that gun will be chambered and ready to fire.

 

Do you even dry fire, brah?

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