Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Recommend a good quality chrono for pistol and high powered rifle


Recommended Posts

I’ve been using a Caldwell chrono and it’s great, used it with pistol, pcc and rifles. The app is great and it’s nice having the data on my phone if I need it. It’s been very accurate as well, whenever I chrono my rounds using another chrono at a match it’s alaays been the same velocity as my chrono. I’d highly recommend it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oehler 35P works very well,  have had one for practically forever and it still works and prints well.  Oehler has them on special now, you get the whole set up and carrying case.

 

If you don't do a lot of chronographing, I would then recommend the Pro Chrono, there are several models, look them over and pick the one you think would suit you best.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, RePete said:

 

No,  8 feet.  That's the distance that IDPA /IPSC/USPSA are set at.

Huh? USPSA APP C2

The closest skyscreen must be placed no less than 10 feet from the shooting location.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

After using a Shooting Chrony and Pact for a while and having them both hit by errant rounds (other shooters, not me) I finally splurged on a Magnetospeed.  It is perfect for rifles and revolvers and most .22 LR fixed barrel pistols like the Ruger, Mk-series, S&W Victory, etc. It is usable for centerfire  semi-auto pistols with Picatinny rail slots on the dust cover.  

 

Its benefits are that it is completely indifferent to ambient light so it works under daylight, florescent artificial light and in complete darkness.  It also doesn't require you to go in front of the firing line to set it up or to change from one firearm to another and with any care in installation, you can't shoot it accidentally.  Muzzle blast is completely ignored too.  There is an SD card in the display that records all of your data for future access.

 

I haven't figured out how to adapt it to other center fire semi-autos with no dust cover slots but there may be a way to do it.  That isn't a problem for me and I love it's versatility and data handling capability.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 2/7/2019 at 8:34 PM, Smithcity said:

Will the lab radar work indoors?

Absolutely. It is the best chronograph I have used ( I have tried 4 or 5 different types) and own a labradar and a shooting chrony. The Labradar is the most convenient one I have used in both set up and for recording results. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

So typically when shooting high power rifle, your not just trying to verify power factor.  Usually your trying to find out extreme spread and standard deviation, along with you average velocity over a larger string of shots.  This kinda changes the game.

 

There hasn't been much in terms of improvement in the lines of "sky-screen" chronographs in the last 20 years.  The $100 rcbs and chrony's are not accurate or consistent enough to get data that you need.  The CED and old Ohler are decent, but their interfaces are like trying to program a 90's era home security system.

 

The Labradar is an awesome creation.  Its relatively easy to use, provides all the information on the screen at hand, and is by far one of the most accurate ways of measuring possible.  Its great all around for rifle and pistol, and if I had to get only one chronograph this would be it.  It basically has two downsides... The first being price.  The other is trying to use it on crowded firing lines.  Unless you have a range to yourself, it can be problematic.  

 

The Magnetospeed is another option, specifically the more expensive V3 version.  Its multi button interface is considerably easier to scroll thru and work than the lite version.  It ironically doesn't seem to effect barrel harmonics as much as one would assume.  Its a very simple design that works quiet well.  And its about $150 cheaper than a lab radar.  Its easy to pack in your gear bag, and not awkward to setup (no tripods or sweet spots) as it literally just clamps on your barrel.  The big winner I give it is the user interface.  It give standard deviation and extreme spread on the fly, so no math work involved on your part, and its archiving ability is really cool.  They work on suppressed guns, and quiet guns that sometimes the lab radar has problems picking up, and it doesn't care if someone is on the bench next to you.  Also if you want to get it off your barrel, a little creativity can go a long way.  I've seen folks buy cheap picatinny attachments and use pieces of extruded aluminum to make mounts to isolate sensor from the barrel because they perceive it might effect their accuracy, which in my experience it doesn't.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

I'm trying to get the gear I need to get up and running with my reloading game.

 

Getting closer.

 

I do need a chrono.....sold my old one along with my older reloading gear 12+ years ago.

 

I need something that will work for me on the indoor ranges when I'm working up handgun loads......as well as be of use for my hunting rifle loads.

 

The indoor range has narrow lanes with dividers....pretty much like most.  I'd be unable to set up a chrono downrange any distance at all as per range rules.  The LabRadar appears to able to sit on the shelf right next to where I'll be shooting.

 

How sensitive is it if there is someone shooting a couple lanes down from me ?

 

 

 

Ideally, I'll have my arse there when the range opens so I can have it to myself for a few minutes and not have to worry about other shooters.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 10 months later...

I have used a Pro Chrono for 20+ years for reloading and have never failed the chrono stage at a USPSA match- open and limited. Use it outdoors at ranges. Cost for this chronograph is about $110 and it comes in a box that you can store it in. Take a look at this chrono.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

The main problem with most of the "sky screen" type chronographs is they can't be used on indoor ranges under the typical flourescent (or even LED) lights.  The 60 Hz "flutter" makes the reading unstable and unusable.  You have to provide a dedicated incandecent or IR light source or battery powered LEDs.  Both the Labradar and Magnetospeed chronographs are indifferent to the ambient light type or amount and can be used anywhere.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 months later...

This is strictly about rifles & how it saved my bacon before a deer hunt.

I have the CED chrono and like it.  But decided to give the magnetospeed sporter a try for my rifles, bolt guns.  Never wait till the last minute to develop a ballistic card before going deer hunting.  As usual I did and after doing a ladder test for a new barrel it was late, very late, no sun & no infared screens for the CED chrono.  I figured I was toast since I was  flying out the next morning.  Remembered I had the Magnetospeed and figured what do I have to lose.  Set it up in my shop with overhead lights on and shot into a berm outside my shop door.  It did everything I wanted and I got my first white tail buck at 300 yards.

They have upgrades out there to mount it to rifle without mounting to barrel,  So for pistols it is the CED and my rifles it is the Magnetospeed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...