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Advice for First Time USPSA Competition


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Hi,

 

I’m about to start competing at A local USPSA match in our town. I need advice on what I will be needing as I do not understand most of the terminologies (Minor/Major) (9mm vs 40cal)

 

I currently have a Glock 19 that is all stock, using Federal 115 gr bullets. 

 

I’m serious about competitive shooting, but I have a limited budget. As I save up and get better, I wanted to ask for suggestions on a gun I will be investing in, as well as the gear (belts,mag pouches)

 

Thank you!

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Hi,

 

I’m about to start competing at A local USPSA match in our town. I need advice on what I will be needing as I do not understand most of the terminologies (Minor/Major) (9mm vs 40cal)

 

I currently have a Glock 19 that is all stock, using Federal 115 gr bullets. 

 

I’m serious about competitive shooting, but I have a limited budget. As I save up and get better, I wanted to ask for suggestions on a gun I will be investing in, as well as the gear (belts,mag pouches)

 

Thank you!

You're starting in a very budget friendly way. Glock 19 is solid for production division which has a 10 round mag limit. If it's a loaded start 10+1.

 

You'll need 5 or 6 mags to run a stage but 9mm factory ammo is cheap. Eventually, as you dive deeper into the rabbit hole you may getting into reloading which doesn't save you much in 9mm BUT you shoot more volume for the same money.

 

As you can afford it, definitely upgrade sights to competition (black rear with fiber optic front/black target front sight), trigger to a lighter disconnector & flat trigger and base pad upgrade to assist with reloads.

 

Compete with what you have for now and learn the game. Refine your fundamentals at home with dry fire. Ask to shoot your fellow competitors guns to see what fits your hands and feels good ergonomically before your next purchase.

 

Most importantly, have fun and don't get obsessed with achieving a classification rank. As you evolve in your competitive shooting you will naturally gain higher classification.

 

Good luck!

 

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

 

 

 

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If you're shooting Federal factory ammo, you're shooting 9mm Minor (needs PF125 or more) as

opposed to 9mm Major which is PF 165+).

 

Are you shooting a 9mm or a .40 caliber Glock ?

 

You'll need eye/ear protection, enough magazines to hold at least 50 rounds or more, holster that

covers the trigger (has to hang from your strong side - no crossdraws or shoulder holsters, etc).

 

You need magazine holders on your belt.

 

You should read the rules of USPSA - and understand them.   Learn about all the safety rules,

e.g.  breaking the 180.    

 

Bring adequate clothing that is weather appropriate, food and beverages, sneakers, rain gear?

something to sit on, umbrella, bandaids.

 

Bring your Glock to the range unloaded, and cased.

 

Tell the MD you're new - and follow his/her instructions.

 

Don't touch your Glock until the RO tells you to.

 

You might want to attend one match before you shoot - but bring your equipment with you,

just In case you have a very friendly MD.

 

Stay safe, and have fun.    :) 

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1 hour ago, Rnlinebacker said:

You're starting in a very budget friendly way. Glock 19 is solid for production division which has a 10 round mag limit. If it's a loaded start 10+1.

 

You'll need 5 or 6 mags to run a stage but 9mm factory ammo is cheap. Eventually, as you dive deeper into the rabbit hole you may getting into reloading which doesn't save you much in 9mm BUT you shoot more volume for the same money.

 

As you can afford it, definitely upgrade sights to competition (black rear with fiber optic front/black target front sight), trigger to a lighter disconnector & flat trigger and base pad upgrade to assist with reloads.

 

Compete with what you have for now and learn the game. Refine your fundamentals at home with dry fire. Ask to shoot your fellow competitors guns to see what fits your hands and feels good ergonomically before your next purchase.

 

Most importantly, have fun and don't get obsessed with achieving a classification rank. As you evolve in your competitive shooting you will naturally gain higher classification.

 

Good luck!

 

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

 

 

 

Thanks for the tips! Yes, I am also looking to reload my own ammo. I have been doing a lot of research lately and I figured I can reload 1000 rounds of 9mm at an estimated cost of $110 whereas factory ammo costs around $180/1000 rounds. 

 

I have been dry firing a lot lately, experimenting on my grip. I’ve been asking top shooters in my area and their general feedback is I am gripping the gun wrong. (I do a push/pull since my hands get sweaty)

 

Will test it out on the match and see how I can improve.

 

thanks again!

 

 

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1 hour ago, Hi-Power Jack said:

If you're shooting Federal factory ammo, you're shooting 9mm Minor (needs PF125 or more) as

opposed to 9mm Major which is PF 165+).

 

Are you shooting a 9mm or a .40 caliber Glock ?

 

You'll need eye/ear protection, enough magazines to hold at least 50 rounds or more, holster that

covers the trigger (has to hang from your strong side - no crossdraws or shoulder holsters, etc).

 

You need magazine holders on your belt.

 

You should read the rules of USPSA - and understand them.   Learn about all the safety rules,

e.g.  breaking the 180.    

 

Bring adequate clothing that is weather appropriate, food and beverages, sneakers, rain gear?

something to sit on, umbrella, bandaids.

 

Bring your Glock to the range unloaded, and cased.

 

Tell the MD you're new - and follow his/her instructions.

 

Don't touch your Glock until the RO tells you to.

 

You might want to attend one match before you shoot - but bring your equipment with you,

just In case you have a very friendly MD.

 

Stay safe, and have fun.    :) 

I am shooting a 9mm glock 19. I’ve gotten myself a few magazines from Magpul and a cheap holster and magazine pouch just for starters.

 

Thanks for all the tips! Will definitely take note of the rules. Wouldnt want to make the people around me feel unsafe in handling my firearm.

 

thanks again!

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My advise for anyone’s first match is to only worry about safety. Don’t break the 180 by being slow and deliberate. While moving concentrate on finger out of the trigger guard and where is my barrel pointed at all times. These are the things that I see ruin first time shooters day. All the other stuff comes with time but safety first. 

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1 hour ago, JohnS23 said:

Thanks for the tips! Yes, I am also looking to reload my own ammo. I have been doing a lot of research lately and I figured I can reload 1000 rounds of 9mm at an estimated cost of $110 whereas factory ammo costs around $180/1000 rounds. 

 

I have been dry firing a lot lately, experimenting on my grip. I’ve been asking top shooters in my area and their general feedback is I am gripping the gun wrong. (I do a push/pull since my hands get sweaty)

 

Will test it out on the match and see how I can improve.

 

thanks again!

 

 

 

Don't worry about the "savings" you will get from reloading....you will just shoot ALOT more and spend the money on bullets, primer, powder, etc.  More about getting your loads just right.  Enjoy your match...be safe and don't rush!

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Thanks for the tips! Yes, I am also looking to reload my own ammo. I have been doing a lot of research lately and I figured I can reload 1000 rounds of 9mm at an estimated cost of $110 whereas factory ammo costs around $180/1000 rounds. 
 
I have been dry firing a lot lately, experimenting on my grip. I’ve been asking top shooters in my area and their general feedback is I am gripping the gun wrong. (I do a push/pull since my hands get sweaty)
 
Will test it out on the match and see how I can improve.
 
thanks again!
 
 


This video will assist you obtaining a proper grip. You can learn this within a day or two. It will help you tremendously!

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

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There are a lot of great youtube videos that can help you in your preparation. I started last year and found that you spend a lot more on ammo than anything else. I went through about 5,000 rounds between practice and the 12 matches and practice. Always keep an eye out for bulk 9 bargains!! 

 

Stay Safe, Listen to the RO (range officer) Don't brake the 180!! and get serious slowly, most important (for me) is have fun. 

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let people in your squad know it's your first match. Go slow and be aware of your muzzle at all time (ensuring you dont break the 180). by the last stage you will be confortable enough that you will speed up a bit (which is fine, as long as you do it safely). You aren't going to win the match your first time, so don't feel like you are competing against anyone else. Just go out there, get a feel for the game and most importantly, have fun.

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  • 4 weeks later...
  • 3 weeks later...

As others have said, take it slow and be safe. One other thing I wish someone had told me as I was starting was how key it is to practice your draw. Although making a great time isn’t that important when you’re first starting out, practicing your draw helps you to be faster as well as safer. Good luck, it’s an addictive sport! 

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Read the Production rules for the correct placement of your holster and mag pouches.  It might be a little easier on you to shoot Limited for your first match.  You can start with full mags instead of 10 rounds.  You could even use G17 mage for a couple of extra rounds.  In Limited you are not restricted on the holster and mag pouch position.  

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On 1/7/2019 at 6:06 PM, JohnS23 said:

Hi,

 

I’m about to start competing at A local USPSA match in our town. I need advice on what I will be needing as I do not understand most of the terminologies (Minor/Major) (9mm vs 40cal)

 

I currently have a Glock 19 that is all stock, using Federal 115 gr bullets. 

 

I’m serious about competitive shooting, but I have a limited budget. As I save up and get better, I wanted to ask for suggestions on a gun I will be investing in, as well as the gear (belts,mag pouches)

 

Thank you!

 

Stay chill, don't invest a lot.

 

Get cheap plastic mag pouches that now are more ubiquitous and cheaper than a while back (lost of 2nd hand Ghost ones for super cheap, here), doesn't matter what kind.

 

Don't bother with heavy baseplates, upgrades, etc.

 

The only thing you need to upgrade right now are your sights. Check out Dawson Precision. 

 

Shoot factory ammo, relax yourself, understand how the recoil works with sight recovery, be safe while moving, be efficient while moving, get your sights on target faster, know how too use your trigger for different target presentation/distances, see your sights, understand the advantage of seeing multiple targets from one position - even though stage planning is limited by your 10 round mags, know that reloading on the move isn't always everything, don't be afraid of taking risks and looking stupid (I still do this).

Invest in your mindset and perspective before you do, your gear.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/7/2019 at 6:06 PM, JohnS23 said:

Hi,

 

I’m about to start competing at A local USPSA match in our town. I need advice on what I will be needing as I do not understand most of the terminologies (Minor/Major) (9mm vs 40cal)

 

I currently have a Glock 19 that is all stock, using Federal 115 gr bullets. 

 

I’m serious about competitive shooting, but I have a limited budget. As I save up and get better, I wanted to ask for suggestions on a gun I will be investing in, as well as the gear (belts,mag pouches)

 

Thank you!

I realize I’m late to the party here, but if you wear a 36” belt I have a spare I’d give you to help you get started if you haven’t bought one already.

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On 1/7/2019 at 6:25 PM, Hi-Power Jack said:

Don't touch your Glock until the RO tells you to.

 

You see that dq happen with new shooters. You also see them get into trouble when they need transition to moving backwards with a gun (180) and when they reload while moving toward their weak hand side (180), this stuff can all be practiced at home. 

 

You do not just want to not break the 180, you want it to be obvious that you are not breaking the 180, r.o.'s have been known to get nervous and make a bad call now and then. 

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The #1 thing I communicate to new shooters is the following, 

 

"There is nobody rushing you. This is your time, breathe, do not feel rushed. Ill be right here; you can stop shooting at any time and turn your head/not your gun and ask me questions. It is just you and me. We are here to have fun!"

 

It calms them down (and me), quite a bit. I encourage everyone to communicate this to new shooters!

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