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matir

How good a shot before starting USPSA?

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How good a shot were you before you started shooting in USPSA?  How tight should my groups be?

 

I just got a CZ-75 SP-01 (my first full caliber pistol) and I'm very excited about trying competition, but right now my groups are still pretty terrible (6" at 15 yds).  How tight should I be getting them before I start competing?  I'd rather not look foolish at my first match, after all.

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I was horrible, but i thought i was a little better than horrible.  Just go shoot and be safe.  Almost everyone looks more or less foolish at their first match, i am sure they are exceptions, but they are very rare.  Read the rule book, or at least the safety portion and go find a match and let them know you are a total noob, they will get you lined out

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5 minutes ago, matir said:

  I'd rather not look foolish at my first match, after all.

To some extent that is unavoidable. :) 

 

If you do try a match have a buddy video you. In as little as one season you will look back at the video and get a kick out of it. Even if you are an awesome shot you will most likely have the "wrong" gun, gear, ammo, etc etc...... It's that way with any game though.

 

But don't let any of your concerns keep you from getting out and at least try it. There are all kinds of shooters and skill levels but by and large most are great people who will be glad to help. In a match you are not trying to shoot groups. You are trying to hit the targets as fast as you can. Just do it!!

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I'll give it a shot.  I don't have any friends who shoot competition right now, but hopefully I'll make some after I start attending a few matches.  :)

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When i first started i knew 0 people involved, just saw it on shooting USA and thought it looked fun.  So don't let that bother you, in a few matches you will know quite a few people

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How good a shot were you before you started shooting in USPSA?  How tight should my groups be?
 
I just got a CZ-75 SP-01 (my first full caliber pistol) and I'm very excited about trying competition, but right now my groups are still pretty terrible (6" at 15 yds).  How tight should I be getting them before I start competing?  I'd rather not look foolish at my first match, after all.
hey bud, no one is there to judge. Three tips:

1. Please maintain safety AT ALL TIMES. Gun can be tinkered at safe table with NO AMMO or under "MAKE READY" command of Range Officer. PLEASE listen clearly for this command from RO or ask again if unclear.

2. Please be open to tips & teachings from your squad mates. Make a mental note and store what you can from everyone.

3. PLEASE HAVE FUN!! The only pressure you're gonna have is that which you place on yourself. USPSA is so difficult to comprehend in the beginning because there's so many different things to learn. As you get experience you will learn to compartmentalize all the macro/micro components of being a good competitor.

Bonus: Dry fire, dry fire, dry fire! Grip, stance, trigger prep/pull, right alignment can all be mastered at home so when you're doing live fire you're just confirming the efficacy of your dry fire.

Please post your experience once you get that first obr key your belt

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk

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The goal of your first couple of matches is simply not to DQ. When you get to your first match, make sure they know you’re a new shooter and folks will help you along. Don’t worry about anything related to performance until you are comfortable doing a course of fire safely.

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6 minutes ago, Sarge said:

Just do it!!

 

100% this. I put off actually starting to shoot USPSA for so long, and I wish I'd done it sooner. I have a buddy of mine that started with me as well, so that made it easier. He doesn't shoot with me any more, but it was nice having somebody to go to the first few matches with. Still though, the fear of being "bad" and making myself look bad was the hardest thing to get over, but you've got to be willing to get out of your comfort zone. My shooting has improved so much more just by having a real reason to get better instead of just going out and shooting at steel plates and cardboard for fun. Even still, a lot of other people I talk to about it are just too afraid to start something they aren't familiar with, and they miss out on the sport because of it.

 

Anyway, after having gone to a few matches by myself I kinda prefer it that way. You'll slowly start to get to know everyone at your club, and might see a lot of the same people if there are a few clubs in your area. Just be a nice person, and help out as much as you can. Show up early to set up, and stay after to tear down if you can. Help paste targets after every shooter, and maybe after a few matches you could even offer to run PractiScore if you're up to it. Learning PractiScore really helped me learn how hit factor and everything works a lot sooner, plus you'll follow the RO around and learn the subtleties of how targets are scored at the same time. Also, make sure you're familiar with the rules before you get yourself DQ'd right off the bat. I've attached some files for a sort of overview of where to start. A bit older, but still good information in there.

FirstMatch.pdf

uspsa-getting-started.pdf

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14 minutes ago, matir said:

I'll give it a shot.  I don't have any friends who shoot competition right now, but hopefully I'll make some after I start attending a few matches.  :)

Where are you located? I guarantee you there is somebody on here who is close and shoots most of your local matches. I probably take 2-3 new folks to a match every year. It takes a lot of time from my shooting but thats a small price to pay for me to get a new shooter to feel a little more comfortable.

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11 minutes ago, Sarge said:

Where are you located? I guarantee you there is somebody on here who is close and shoots most of your local matches. I probably take 2-3 new folks to a match every year. It takes a lot of time from my shooting but thats a small price to pay for me to get a new shooter to feel a little more comfortable.

 

Northern California (Bay Area).  I believe Richmond Rod & Gun club is the only USPSA club in the area, but I could be wrong of course.

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1 minute ago, matir said:

 

Northern California (Bay Area).  I believe Richmond Rod & Gun club is the only USPSA club in the area, but I could be wrong of course.

Somebody will be along.;)

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Just get started, I was terrible when i started but I learned some how to practice/dry fire hand have been steadily improving over the years. Go be safe and have fun, you will likely be hooked after your first match. 

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20 minutes ago, matir said:

 

 I believe Richmond Rod & Gun club is the only USPSA club in the area

 

1.  I'd check www.uspsa.org for list of clubs in your area.

 

2.  I don't mean to be a negative person, but I'd try to figure out why your groups

     are 6" at 15 yards before I ventured forth on your lifelong journey into USPSA.

 

You have a Great Gun (can't blame that), but could be your sights are loose,

or you're using very poor ammo, or your trigger pull needs some work.

 

Are these 6" groups from a bench rest ?  Or standing and shooting two-handed ?

Rapid fire or very slow fire ?

 

I take it this is your first gun that's NOT a .22 Rimfire ?   Are you shooting this 9mm

with full earmuffs, in-doors or outdoors ?   Might be flinching (very easy to do with

the wrong muffs, shooting a 9mm indoors).

 

What kind of groups are you getting from your .22's, at 15 yards ?

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26 minutes ago, matir said:

 

Northern California (Bay Area).  I believe Richmond Rod & Gun club is the only USPSA club in the area, but I could be wrong of course.

 

Just a little too far for me to go with you or I would haha. I know there are quite a few clubs in Sacramento area that some of the guys at my local club even go to. I'm in Northern NV if you ever decide to come shoot here!

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1 hour ago, matir said:

How good a shot were you before you started shooting in USPSA?  How tight should my groups be?

 

I just got a CZ-75 SP-01 (my first full caliber pistol) and I'm very excited about trying competition, but right now my groups are still pretty terrible (6" at 15 yds).  How tight should I be getting them before I start competing?  I'd rather not look foolish at my first match, after all.

 

USPSA is not a bullseye sport, so don’t obsess about groups. The goal is acceptable accuracy at speed, which I’m still working on and will probably be refining up until the day I retire from the sport.

 

Several have already said to just go, so I’ll pivot to what I wish I had when I started. 

 

Buy Charlie Perez’s book

 

Listen to Steve Anderson’s podcast. 

 

Go have some fun. 

 

 

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It’s more important to start out as a safe  shooter than a good shooter. It’s wise to show up with enough mags, mag pouches, and a decent holster so you’re not fumbling around with that stuff and can concentrate on safely handling the gun.   The actual skills will develop over time, and this is oftentimes one of those sports where you won’t know what to practice until you do it.  Right now you’re concerned about groups, but at the end of the day you may realize it’s actually reloads that you need to practice, or remembering your stage plan, etc.  6” groups at 15 yards will get you A’s and C’s all day long.  Just go and have fun.  

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19 minutes ago, Hi-Power Jack said:

 

1.  I'd check www.uspsa.org for list of clubs in your area.

 

2.  I don't mean to be a negative person, but I'd try to figure out why your groups

     are 6" at 15 yards before I ventured forth on your lifelong journey into USPSA.

 

You have a Great Gun (can't blame that), but could be your sights are loose,

or you're using very poor ammo, or your trigger pull needs some work.

 

Are these 6" groups from a bench rest ?  Or standing and shooting two-handed ?

Rapid fire or very slow fire ?

 

I take it this is your first gun that's NOT a .22 Rimfire ?   Are you shooting this 9mm

with full earmuffs, in-doors or outdoors ?   Might be flinching (very easy to do with

the wrong muffs, shooting a 9mm indoors).

 

What kind of groups are you getting from your .22's, at 15 yards ?

 

Maybe his groups are that way cause he needs to go to a match and learn some solid basics on how to shoot.  I had shot pistols my whole life but didn't know what i didn't know till i went to a match and saw some people who could really shoot.  Then i had a Master class shooter give me a few pointers and the blinders came off and I learned more in a couple of matches than i had my entire life.  

 

To the OP, go to the match be safe have fun and start learning

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24 minutes ago, Hi-Power Jack said:

 

1.  I'd check www.uspsa.org for list of clubs in your area.

 

2.  I don't mean to be a negative person, but I'd try to figure out why your groups

     are 6" at 15 yards before I ventured forth on your lifelong journey into USPSA.

 

You have a Great Gun (can't blame that), but could be your sights are loose,

or you're using very poor ammo, or your trigger pull needs some work.

 

I had similar results with Blazer Brass and Remington UMC.  While neither are "top shelf" ammo, I don't think it's the ammo.  My trigger pull is definitely a possibility.

 

24 minutes ago, Hi-Power Jack said:

 

Are these 6" groups from a bench rest ?  Or standing and shooting two-handed ?

Rapid fire or very slow fire ?

 

Slow fire from standing with a two hand grip.

 

24 minutes ago, Hi-Power Jack said:

 

I take it this is your first gun that's NOT a .22 Rimfire ?   Are you shooting this 9mm

with full earmuffs, in-doors or outdoors ?   Might be flinching (very easy to do with

the wrong muffs, shooting a 9mm indoors).

 

This was outdoors at a public range, wearing earmuffs.

 

24 minutes ago, Hi-Power Jack said:

 

What kind of groups are you getting from your .22's, at 15 yards ?

 

2-3" groups.  Could obviously be better, but I've only been shooting for ~2 months.

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1 hour ago, matir said:

I'll give it a shot.  I don't have any friends who shoot competition right now, but hopefully I'll make some after I start attending a few matches.  :)

 

You don't have to have a friend go with you.  If you get the USPSA bug you'll acquire a lot of friends that are of a like mind.  My first match I shot with my M&P 9c carry gun.  That's all I had with a lot of magazines at the time.  I was at the range just plinking and the USPSA guys were there setting up all kinds of stuff.  I asked them what they were doing, they told me, and said come on and get some.  Everyone was friendly and helpful, from the poor shooters to the average shooters all the way up to the master shooters & sponsored shooters.  Everyone was helpful & inviting.  They were even offering me the use of their extra guns and equipment to try instead of my 9c.  The main thing they wanted to know I understood was safety, gun handling, etc.  Even if you don't climb high in the ranks over time your gun skills will be many times better than they currently are.

 

If you think USPSA might be a bit much at first (it isn't), look into Steel Challenge to get your feet wet in competitive shooting.

 

Just get in there and do it.  Not being good isn't anything to worry about.  Not even trying IS something to worry about (in more things than just shooting).  It takes some backbone to go try your first match.  It takes even more backbone to go back again after you see how badly some of these shooters beat you.  All those good shooters you see were once just like you.  It's humbling but well worth it.  Get in there.

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I have shot at Richmond several times and with several of them at my local matches. They are good guys.

Tell them you are new and everyone the will help you learn and make sure you are safe and walk you through the commands and stuff. Their stages might be a little intimidating for a first timer but don't let that worry you. Take your time and don't try to go fast, just learn the rules and methods.

If you drive out to Linden range (my local) they offer a new shooter course and goes a little slower through the stages with the instructor following you and coaching each shooter as needed.

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10 hours ago, matir said:

...  How tight should my groups be?

 

... but right now my groups are still pretty terrible (6" at 15 yds).  ...  I'd rather not look foolish at my first match, after all.

 

First, 6" at 15 yards is A zone, so you are good to go. Be safe and shoot as fast as you see your sights on the target.

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I took an "introduction to shooting sports" class as soon as I found one. That was after shooting some matches but if there is local instruction to get things started right I think it would be good to work with a better shooter asap. I would not go to a high dollar big name class, the one that I went to was $40 for an afternoon with a skilled local shooter 6-8 other beginners. If you do not have good basics, grip, stance, etc, I think you are best served trying to start out with good habits. 

 

I also reccomend reading Brian's book, some of it will be a bit deep at first but there is good stuff in there for the beginner as well. 

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16 hours ago, matir said:

 

2-3" groups (with a .22).  and 6" groups with a 9mm.   I've only been shooting for ~2 months.

 

Sounds like you're reacting to the noise and recoil of the 9mm cartridge.

 

That's normal, at first.

 

As you practice, I'd work on getting your shooting with the 9mm more in line with

what you're capable of with the .22   

 

Also, practice getting those groups At Speed - shooting rapidly.   And, try some

20 - 25 yard shots (USPSA does offer some small plates at 25 yards, now and 

then, and even some targets at 40+ yards.   Give them a try, also.

 

Just takes practice - only 2 months out, don't worry, it will come.     :) 

 

Have fun with it.     :cheers:

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Try using earplugs and muffs next time you shoot. 

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