Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!
fmiller

2400 in .357 LSWC confusion

Recommended Posts

I've loaded a batch of 158gr LSWC's for testing 2400. Starting with 14 grs...  (14.5, 15, 15.5). This is for my 627 4-inch. (not the PC)

 

Just rechecking my numbers, I'm finding a HUGE variation in published data.
 

The Sierra manual lists 12.1 - 13.9 for it's jacketed round....  which would suggest a cast bullet would be even lower.

 

At the other end, the RCBS guide says 14.5 - 15.5 with muzzle velocities in the 1700s (this is for a CAST bullet...).

 

(this is all from Complete Reloading Manual compendium)

 

Are my loads too hot?

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think they are anywhere near excessive pressure wise,  probably good for hunting or self defense, maybe a little hot for just target shooting.  What purpose are you loading them for ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My loads for my Smith 686 with 158 JHP. 14.9 of 2400. 15 gr and I have to tap the cases out of the cylinder. So in my opinion you’re loading them to hot. You’re going to get a lot of lead build up. I would stay around 14 find something comfortable no sense in pushing them that hard.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, fmiller said:

I've loaded a batch of 158gr LSWC's for testing 2400. Starting with 14 grs...   

 

Have you put any thru the chrono, yet ?

 

I get conservative, and start LOW, and work UP slowly, with my chrono.     :) 

 

Are you using .38 or .357 brass ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Older data showed hotter 2400 loads.

 

There is a guy on the cast bullets forum that tested old vs. new 2400 and found it the same.

 

Elmer Kieth used 15.3grs 2400 with a 158gr

John Taffin says 14-15gr with a gas checked 158

 

speer #8 shows 15.5gr
My speer #10 book shows a max of 15.9gr

speer #12 drops to 12.5

current Sierra 5th still shows 15.0gr

I have worked up 158gr cast/coated to 15.8gr without any signs of pressure. 1364fps 5" 686

this is in a 686 dash 4

velocity is higher than max 110/296 loads and cases extract with ease.

This load does have sticky extraction from my rossi 1892 levergun.

I typically load them to 15grs 2400 / 158gr hardcast

14.7gr = 1275fps 158br MBC SWC

 

HbqNBcf.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Check the primers used in the data.  Speer has found differences with loads between standard and magnum primers and, I believe (no manual in front of me at present) that they currently recommend standard primers with 2400.

 

Also, much of the earlier data, such as the Speer No. 8 were not compiled using a pressure gun.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've loaded heavy bullet high velocity 357 loads for 40 years.

Old 2400 was the Keith load, as listed above.

New 2400 I've gone down a grain.

Linotype lead (hard and fitted to the bore) won't strip lead into the barrel.  the but is it has to really be sized

to your bore.  I use .358 dia. bullets after slugging the barrel and test firing bullets and carefully watching the bore

for any leading.

As mentioned start low and work up.  Once you get rounds sticking in the chambers go BACK to the previous 

load at least.

Also make sure your chambers in the cyl. all nice and smooth.

Remember 158gr hard cast bullet at 1000fps will penetrate through anything that isn't solid rock,brick etc.

Enjoy and be carefully observant 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My results with a MO coated 158 SWC Fed small pistol magnum primers, Didnt have any extraction issues.  But had much better results loading 180's felt better also.  Really liked the 180 flat points over 11.6 grs of 2400 gave me single digit SD's was very accurate. and 1161 fps out of my 5" 686. Intended use would be bowling pins and back country SD.



2400
14.7 gr, 1363 fps, SD 56
15gr 1433 fps SD 50
15.3gr 1431 fps SD 20.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The OP mentions load data variables all over the place, most likely because of the varying bullet hardness used in developing that data from one book to another.  Also I saw some comments that his load is too hard for lead to be pushed...lead pills pushed that hard can be done as it was pioneered by Phil Sharpe & Elmer Kieth and they had great success. That success without leading for longevity in accuracy was with good bullet lubes and bullets believe it or not with a BHN of 10-12! Todays production cast pills have mostly gone "hardball" around BHN of 18-20. As have coated bullets. There is no advantage to it other than to better withstand deformity in bulk packaged boxes during handling. Despite the thought you need a hard bullet to withstand higher velocities you don't. A softer alloy, to a point of course, will seal and mold itself to the bore and with good lube will not wipe off much lead in the bore. Hard alloys generally need the rifling to cut into the bullet displacing lead away from the bullet in order to conform to the bore resulting in loose deposits coating the bore. One last thing, I always had better accuracy with W296 in the .357 than 2400. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...