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bigcat

First 1911 or 2011

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finally getting first 1911! Very excited and it should be in my hands tomorrow. I have heard how delicate they can be and I am a little nervous because I do a heavy amount of dry fire practice. The gun is a RIA double stack in 9mm by the way. Is there anything different about practicing dry fire than with a Glock?

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5 minutes ago, bigcat said:

finally getting first 1911! Very excited and it should be in my hands tomorrow. I have heard how delicate they can be and I am a little nervous because I do a heavy amount of dry fire practice. The gun is a RIA double stack in 9mm by the way. Is there anything different about practicing dry fire than with a Glock?

 

Your trigger probably won't suck as much?

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The only issue I have with dry firing with my 2011s is that mag well gets beat up, other than that you are fine.

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36 minutes ago, tanks said:

The only issue I have with dry firing with my 2011s is that mag well gets beat up, other than that you are fine.

Thanks. I have heard that they are a little delicate and something about you have to hold trigger when rack the slide on empty mag or some crap. Is that true

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12 minutes ago, bigcat said:

Thanks. I have heard that they are a little delicate and something about you have to hold trigger when rack the slide on empty mag or some crap. Is that true

Not that I've heard of. Just run it like any other gun.  Finger off trigger til you're on target. 

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16 hours ago, bigcat said:

Thanks. I have heard that they are a little delicate and something about you have to hold trigger when rack the slide on empty mag or some crap. Is that true

 

Never ever do this. 

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16 hours ago, bigcat said:

Thanks. I have heard that they are a little delicate and something about you have to hold trigger when rack the slide on empty mag or some crap. Is that true

You probably don’t want to drop the slide using slide stop on an empty chamber. 

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21 minutes ago, Cypress said:

 

Never ever do this. 

 

?

Normally when firing the last round the trigger is still held back while the slide cycles with a empty mag. 

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Just now, IHAVEGAS said:

 

?

Normally when firing the last round the trigger is still held back while the slide cycles with a empty mag. 

 

Maybe I misunderstood what the OP was trying to accomplish. I read it as manually racking the slide, not using a final shot. I can't picture why anyone would need to manually rack a slide on an empty mag (during a match), aside from when the slide doesn't lock back on empty. If the shooter is about to dump the empty mag and reload, a finger in the trigger guard is grounds for a DQ. But again, maybe I'm reading into it incorrectly. 

 

Quote

10.5.9 Failure to keep the finger outside the trigger guard during loading, reloading, or unloading. Exception: while complying with the “Make Ready” command to lower the hammer of a gun without a decocking lever, or while initially loading a revolver with a spurless hammer.

 

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13 minutes ago, bigcat said:

No I was just talking about racking the slide to dry fire practice. Not during a competition 

 

Man, I'd still caution you from fingering the trigger while manipulating the slide. Bad habit to train into your muscles. But that's just me. 

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7 minutes ago, Cypress said:

 

Man, I'd still caution you from fingering the trigger while manipulating the slide. Bad habit to train into your muscles. But that's just me. 

I don't want to I agree with you completely. It was something that I was told and I am starting to think from the response here he is crazy.

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The 1911 sear and hammer have a very small contact area. This area can be damaged by repeated dropping of the slide on an empty chamber. When you do this the slide and hammer come forward with greater speed than when loading a round from the magazine and can cause damage to the sears primary surface. So long story short, if you have a nice trigger job and you drop the slide on an empty chamber over and over it won't be nice for long.

 

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An old practice with bullseye 1911s was to load the gun by having the slide locked back, inserting a loaded magazine, holding the trigger all the way back and then dropping the slide by either slingshotting or with the slide release lever.  The idea was that this simulated the firing sequence and protected your sear/hammer interface from getting damaged.  Some advocate doing this during fry fire as well.  If you use this technique enough times you will eventually get an AD by letting the trigger go forward just a little.  Don’t do this.  Ever.  It’s a habit that will get you disqualified or injured eventually.  I dry fire my 1911s a lot by just running the slide and I don’t hold the trigger back when recocking the gun, even though it simulates the firing sequence.  I don’t let my slide drop on an empty chamber, just hold the slide and let it go forward slowly when dry firing.  If I have to replace ignition components early so be it, but thousands of dry fires have not done anything to any of my pistols so far.

Jeff

Edited by JNW

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58 minutes ago, JNW said:

An old practice with bullseye 1911s was to load the gun by having the slide locked back, inserting a loaded magazine, holding the trigger all the way back and then dropping the slide by either slingshotting or with the slide release lever.  The idea was that this simulated the firing sequence and protected your sear/hammer interface from getting damaged.  Some advocate doing this during fry fire as well.  If you use this technique enough times you will eventually get an AD by letting the trigger go forward just a little.  Don’t do this.  Ever.  It’s a habit that will get you disqualified or injured eventually.  I dry fire my 1911s a lot by just running the slide and I don’t hold the trigger back when recocking the gun, even though it simulates the firing sequence.  I don’t let my slide drop on an empty chamber, just hold the slide and let it go forward slowly when dry firing.  If I have to replace ignition components early so be it, but thousands of dry fires have not done anything to any of my pistols so far.

Jeff

Thank you that was what I wanted to know. That was exactly what I was told and I agree with your answer

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7 hours ago, SWprotected said:

The 1911 sear and hammer have a very small contact area. This area can be damaged by repeated dropping of the slide on an empty chamber. When you do this the slide and hammer come forward with greater speed than when loading a round from the magazine and can cause damage to the sears primary surface. So long story short, if you have a nice trigger job and you drop the slide on an empty chamber over and over it won't be nice for long.

 

Thank you

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Why rack the slide at all during dry fire?  I use snap caps so I load one the the mag load and rack.  After that I just cock the hammer.  

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39 minutes ago, mlmiller1 said:

Yeah why not just thumb cock hammer?

I heard that was a terrible thing to do?

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I've been running 1911's for over 40 years and lots of old school thinking regarding light trigger jobs; trying to preserve the sear hammer work.

Simply:

Rack the slide and let it down about half way before letting it go during dryfire, that stops the sear hammer interface from bouncing and helps save your trigger job.

Thumb cocking again IMO is an old school though process.   Today, to me, it's just a PITA to thumb cock and you'll likely never thumb cock your gun in a match so why do it during dryfire.

Rack the slide like you were loading the gun or clearing it etc.

then dryfire the heck out of it until it's all 2nd nature to you.

It's really hard to hurt a gun by using it. More get damaged by poor cleaning technique than from use.

Enjoy your new gun hope it works out great for you 

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11 minutes ago, jcc7x7 said:

I've been running 1911's for over 40 years and lots of old school thinking regarding light trigger jobs; trying to preserve the sear hammer work.

Simply:

Rack the slide and let it down about half way before letting it go during dryfire, that stops the sear hammer interface from bouncing and helps save your trigger job.

Thumb cocking again IMO is an old school though process.   Today, to me, it's just a PITA to thumb cock and you'll likely never thumb cock your gun in a match so why do it during dryfire.

Rack the slide like you were loading the gun or clearing it etc.

then dryfire the heck out of it until it's all 2nd nature to you.

It's really hard to hurt a gun by using it. More get damaged by poor cleaning technique than from use.

Enjoy your new gun hope it works out great for you 

Thank you. Excellent answer and I will enjoy. It is really nice

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