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Grip Strength and Enducrance Training

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Posted (edited)

I’ve been using various forms of grip and forearm strengthening tools for a while now. I started with the traditional “crush” type, moved to the “crush” but individual fingers (which I feel has helped balance the strength of the smaller digits).

 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00KH3L7KC/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_3C2pBb5A9QNQP

 

I then found these finger extensor bands that, after working with progressive resistance training for other areas, has been GREAT at really bringing definition of my forearms. They’re very dynamic and you can adjust them to train exactly what you want and again, keep a balanced strength hand.

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B076HPM822/ref=oh_aui_i_d_old_o0_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Finally I grabbed this interesting gyroscopic strength trainer. I was skeptical at first and it took a LOT of getting the correct motion down, but MAN does this thing pump the blood through the entire forearm! I can physically see he muscles inflating with blood flow and left-to-right coordination has been much better than before. Still not perfectly balanced but it’s progress.

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00KNBVVXG/ref=oh_aui_i_d_old_o0_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I’ve also been trying to utilize these just prior to and during dry fire practice. It makes me feel like I grip the pistol better and more consistently.

 

Do any of you guys use any cool tools to help with grip strength and overall strength balance? It took me a LONG time of limited results in exercising that no matter how much you work an area, if the supporting areas aren’t equally as developed you’ll get NOWHERE.

Edited by Red_Dot

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Double overhand deadlifts and farmers carries have done wonders for my grip.

 

I can close a COC 2.5 now and was stuck at a 1.5 for quite a while.

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Posted (edited)

Just throwing out there, I value wrist locking strength (forearm) way more than grip strength. Because as long as the gun doesn't move around inside the hands, the grips job is done. but the joints (wrist, elbow, and shoulder) affects the recoil management a lot. I don't do any grip specific exercise but by doing general fitness, I have an ok grip strength :)

 

 

 

 

Edited by hwansikcjswo

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I keep one of those Thera-Band FlexBars at my desk at work.  Originally it was to do the elbow therapy stuff, but there are a bunch of thing you can do with it that improve overall hand strength and wrist stability.  

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Posted (edited)

You know what's more important than having strong grip strength?  NOT giving yourself tennis elbow.-- I speak from experience, as I'm pretty certain that my "shooters elbow" came from poor grip strength graining as much as anything else.  Just be careful with this stuff, especially where lots of repetitive motion is involved and stop if you feel anything funky in your elbow...

Edited by jkrispies

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On 7/6/2018 at 1:47 PM, jkrispies said:

You know what's more important than having strong grip strength?  NOT giving yourself tennis elbow.-- I speak from experience, as I'm pretty certain that my "shooters elbow" came from poor grip strength graining as much as anything else.  Just be careful with this stuff, especially where lots of repetitive motion is involved and stop if you feel anything funky in your elbow...

 

^^^^^ This!

 

Tendonopothy is a serious detriment to life generally and good pistol craft specifically. I frequently suffer from it because I get lax on properly stretching the hands and forearms. 

 

 Working the extensor muscles is as important as the flexors. 

 

Take good care of your self in youth so you can enjoy the wisdom you gain from mistakes. 

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On 7/6/2018 at 1:47 PM, jkrispies said:

You know what's more important than having strong grip strength?  NOT giving yourself tennis elbow.-- I speak from experience, as I'm pretty certain that my "shooters elbow" came from poor grip strength graining as much as anything else.  Just be careful with this stuff, especially where lots of repetitive motion is involved and stop if you feel anything funky in your elbow...

Yep, I'm fighting a minor case of tennis elbow right now, when I really need to be dry fire training the shotgun reload......

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On 7/6/2018 at 7:57 AM, Red_Dot said:

Do any of you guys use any cool tools to help with grip strength and overall strength balance?

I certified with Pavel in 2003 and so am a kettlebell (KB) guy. There are several KB exercises that are particularly good for grip strength. Bottom up cleans, shown below  by Jeff Martone,

doing pushups on an inverted KB (handle down on ground with both hands on bottom of bell while you do a pushup balancing on the handle), and doing KB swing with a towel. The latter is used to check your swing technique. The KB should rise faster than your hands if your technique is correct but it is also a burner for your grip. One of my favorite grip exercises is pretty simple - one hand dry fire.

 

A bit of advise. The lifts I mention are pretty straightforward but don't start messing with a lot of KB stuff without some instruction. You can screw yourself up pretty easily. And if you do the cleans Martone describes, start by just holding the inverted KB in the finish position so you know where you are headed when you do the lift and know how much weight you can reasonably handle. When you clean it, keep your attention on the KB, tighten everything up when it inverts, keep the elbow in, and check it with your free hand if it starts to twist in the wrong direction. That will probably happen when you first get started. If it does, your elbow is not tucked into your body and/or your grip is too loose. (Anything Jeff Martone says about KBs you can take to the bank. The guy is great.)

 

 

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I do powerlifting/crossfit everyday, and I dry fire (almost) every day for typically 15-30 minutes.  Deadlifts and pull-ups pretty much got me covered on my grip. I'm at about 140# max grip, with typical estimated grip on the gun around 100-110#.

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On 7/10/2018 at 11:03 AM, bluedevil008 said:

I do powerlifting/crossfit everyday, and I dry fire (almost) every day for typically 15-30 minutes.  Deadlifts and pull-ups pretty much got me covered on my grip.

I agree with this 100%. I've gotten in several discussions with other local shooters about particular dry fire drills to isolate grip etc etc, but, I firmly believe that if you are healthy enough to regularly do variations of power/oly/crossfit lifting, then you will begin to see your grip strength not become a problem anymore.

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Here's another good set of exercises.  These are recovery minded, but I suppose if you did them from the start you would avoid shooters elbow.

 

 

 

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I have benefited from those excercises that Chad Riley / absolute PT demonstrates below. Increased strength and no more tennis elbow! 

 

In order to do the excercises more frequently, I purchased one of these sidewinder pro extreme grip devices.

 

It allows me to get some reps in during conference calls at work. 

 

https://www.sportgrips.com/product/pro-xtreme-3

 

7 hours ago, Glock26Toter said:

Here's another good set of exercises.  These are recovery minded, but I suppose if you did them from the start you would avoid shooters elbow.

 

 

 

 

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thanks for the recommendation on the gyroscope powerball. i remember seeing one of those when i was a kid, and basically forgot they existed until i read about it here. ordered one off amazon, and the workout is amazing for my arms.

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On 7/6/2018 at 11:29 AM, hwansikcjswo said:

Just throwing out there, I value wrist locking strength (forearm) way more than grip strength. Because as long as the gun doesn't move around inside the hands, the grips job is done. but the joints (wrist, elbow, and shoulder) affects the recoil management a lot. I don't do any grip specific exercise but by doing general fitness, I have an ok grip strength :)

 

 

 

 

+1

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Thanks for some great information and exercises. I just started some of the exercises and can see the improvements. 

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