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No grease?

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I have been using Slide Glide for years now and never had a issue but I also live in Texas. What is your take on the no grease video? 

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Maybe oil on tight fitted guns.  But I use the old adage of it it rotates oil, if it slides grease.  You want to form a boundary between wear points and a light grease works well.  You want a sflO grease.  Go over to Grant Cunningham’s blog and read his lubrication 101, it’s a good read.  Then go over to cherry balmz website and they have about 2 hours worth of reading on this very subject.  I know that Adam knows his guns and he builds some really nice blasters, but I don’t think he is a lube specialist. 

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lowest common denominator. Idgits use bearing grease in northern winters & it gums up. Sun baked idgits in the south use axle grease in the summer which catches sand & dirt and it gums up.

 

Gun Oil doesn't really collect junk and stays pretty fluid in most temperatures. Don't want warranty calls? Tell them to use a lubricant which causes the fewest issues. Is it the best? I dunno, not a Mech E. or Chem E. but do know business models.  Not a bash against Atlas, I'd expect most builders to follow this advice.

Edited by SCTaylor

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My guns feel so much better to me when I grease them vs oil when I rack them ect. After a match the grease is still there and when I would oil them not so much. I use Slide Glide Lite and love it. I do put oil on the trigger components and grease on everything else. 

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I've used Slide Glide in Florida with no issues. 

FYI - I've tried Tetra Gun Grease in Florida and it turned into oil while sitting in my garage cabinet.

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I've been using Slide Glide since I first read about it on here.  I am careful about which one I use in cold weather, but other than that, I've never had an issue.  I don't know anything about Atlas, but I can tell you that Infinity uses or at least used to use copious amounts of grease (Slide Glide) on every pistol they sent out the door.

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1 hour ago, RangerTrace said:

I've been using Slide Glide since I first read about it on here.  I am careful about which one I use in cold weather, but other than that, I've never had an issue.  I don't know anything about Atlas, but I can tell you that Infinity uses or at least used to use copious amounts of grease (Slide Glide) on every pistol they sent out the door.

use copious amounts of grease

that there sounds like a Ben Johnson line out of a movie.:)

 

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I'm surprised a guy that builds 1911s would drop the slide on an empty chamber (especially without holding the trigger back).

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Honestly a gun built with quality parts shouldn't have any drama having the slide dropped on a empty chamber. You see it in the vid but I bet it's not all the time, personally I tried slide glide on my CZ and it was good but on my edge that is tight it slowed the slide down for me. 

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1 hour ago, Qbert said:

I'm surprised a guy that builds 1911s would drop the slide on an empty chamber (especially without holding the trigger back).

 

meh. every time you run dry on a stage or in practice it does the same thing, and no kittens die.

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I've heard grease and dirty gun creates soemthing like a lapping compound.  Might be good for a new gun if it needs a break in but could that loosen up the gun prematurely?

 

I use oil only in my Atlas. Runs like a champ!  

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7 hours ago, rooster said:

Maybe oil on tight fitted guns.  But I use the old adage of it it rotates oil, if it slides grease.  You want to form a boundary between wear points and a light grease works well.  You want a sflO grease.  Go over to Grant Cunningham’s blog and read his lubrication 101, it’s a good read.  Then go over to cherry balmz website and they have about 2 hours worth of reading on this very subject.  I know that Adam knows his guns and he builds some really nice blasters, but I don’t think he is a lube specialist. 

Actually if it slides grease if it rotates oil doesn't really hold up that great. In a machine shop every lathe,boring, milling machine, slides you don't grease the slides you oil them. Wheel bearings rotate you grease them diffs rotate you oil them. A mobile crane extending the boom slides and you grease the contact points. So there are different variables that come into it. As long as it has a suitable lube there is no problem. If grease works then fine but oil works just as good in this application.

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In a machine shop your flushing parts with oil as they rotate at high speeds to cool and lubricate that’s why grease won’t work.  Wheel bearings are greased because it’s not really a closed system,  most enclosed machines use pumps and filters to reduce friction, usually the system is pressurized.  On open parts that slide grease stays put and forms a boundary.  However the grease that should be used on firearms is not your standard #2 grease.  It should be a #0 which is light viscosity grease.  Go here for a good read on firearms lubrication.  https://www.cherrybalmz.com/.   http://www.grantcunningham.com/2006/05/lubrication-101/

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Actually it's called coolant and that has nothing to do with the slides on the machine.

a lathe has a bed on which the saddle slides it uses oil not grease the cross slide sit on top of the saddle uses oil not grease. That is the easiest way to put it. I know why bearings have grease and why they are bathed in oil. I'm not here to argue just pointing out that saying grease is for parts that slide is not in fact totally true in a lot of places.

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What I like about slide glide is that it stays where you put it.  I don't shoot my work guns very often.  Maybe every 3-6 months.  But when I do, the slide glide is still there and the guns function perfectly.  

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My main Open gun is very tightly fit.  I can use Super Lube PTFE grease in the summer, but not in the winter.  In the winter I have problems with short stroking unless I oil it every other stage.  I recently switched to Weapons Shield cleaner and lube.  It works like a charm and much better than any of the dozen other oils I've tried.  Grease came with the kit, but I haven't tried it yet.

 

On my backup Open gun, and all my other pistols, oil works just fine.

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15 minutes ago, zzt said:

My main Open gun is very tightly fit.  I can use Super Lube PTFE grease in the summer, but not in the winter.  In the winter I have problems with short stroking unless I oil it every other stage.  I recently switched to Weapons Shield cleaner and lube.  It works like a charm and much better than any of the dozen other oils I've tried.  Grease came with the kit, but I haven't tried it yet.

 

On my backup Open gun, and all my other pistols, oil works just fine.

 

 

I have been using Weapon Shield Oil for a while now, and love it.

 

I also started using the Weapons Shield Grease on the slide rails on a few of my guns, and it seems to work really great, but for some reason I was not feeling the love on my Limited competition gun, so I switched back to just oil.

 

I ordered some Slide Glide about a month ago, but have not tried it yet.

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How do you tell if a lube is working well or not?

I've never had a stoppage, whatever I've put on the rails. In freezing temps I just check that there isn't much of it in the gun.

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I picked up my 9/40 Infinity in person, I was shocked at the amount of grease they put on everything, Lucus Red N Tacky, Casey recommended lubing it the same way, with 6 drops of Blue Oil on the rails, shooting the same ammo in my STI Marauder only lubed with Mobil 1, the difference in felt recoil is quit noticeable, yes the Marauder is lighter, but my Infinity sights seem to return to target faster, with the 40 barrel in shooting the recommended load of 5.2 N320 180 loaded at 1.2, I have found that 40 can be enjoyable to shoot, since this is probably my only Infinity I’ll ever get I plan on lubing mine with copious amount of Red n Tacky with blue oil on the grease on the rails

Edited by 427Cobra

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A light viscosity full synthetic grease on the rails during warm weather months has always worked well for me.  Slide Glide Light works quite well.

New and/or tight guns may short stroke with grease or tend to stumble in colder weather, so keep it in mind.

 

 

 

 

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Mobil 1 oil only. It doesn't burn off in the summer heat, nor thicken up in winter's cold. And it doesn't attract dirt and fouling like grease.

Our local gun range is a very dusty and sandy environment, and I never have a problem with Mobil 1, even in my 22's.

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Oil and grease.  Advanced Weapon Technologies makes the best in the industry. Try it. It is not expensive and well worth it.

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18 hours ago, motosapiens said:

 

meh. every time you run dry on a stage or in practice it does the same thing, and no kittens die.

 

I'm not saying it will damage the gun.  But I do consider it a major faux pas if someone is examining my pistol and they thumb the release on an empty chamber.  That is the last time I let said person handle one of my firearms.

 

That said, Bill Wilson recommends against the practice of dropping an empty slide in his book, "The Combat Auto".  Springfield Armory warns against doing so also.  Check out page 20, #4 of their 1911 manual:

http://www.springfield-armory.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/1911Manual.pdf

 

Those guys know more about building a 1911 than I do, so I'll take their word for it.

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