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Guy shot himself during “make ready”.

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On ‎6‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 4:30 AM, EEH said:

I know of one guy did the same thing with 1911. 45 acp..

 

what at gets me is the race to put gun in holster when finished shooting,, some guys think their still on the clock..

who can unload show clear the fastest.

totally agree

I always did the show clear/holster stuff slowly so the ro stays calm. just like getting pulled over in the car do everything slow.

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On 6/8/2018 at 9:23 PM, SoCalDep said:

... I know it's a horrible inconvenience, but if our range commands started with "make ready and then safely holster with your finger on the frame", there might be a whole lot less DQs.  Much, much more importantly, we'd be encouraging safe firearm manipulation.  If an expert didn't or doesn't like it... then I'm more concerned about them than the new shooter. 

 

Except, not every start in a stage starts with the gun in the holster. You have gun on a table, gun in a box, gun on a barrel, etc., etc.. Are you going to have different commands for different starts? "Make ready" covers all situations.  It is also simple to understand. The commands are the same worldwide in IPSC and are in English. It is the only English some of those people know. 

 

You want strict guidance? IDPA is ? way. ?

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We had a shooter at a match that had a jam and started slapping the muzzle to loosen it, needless to say he went home shortly after that attempt. Luckily he did not shoot himself 

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On 6/9/2018 at 12:23 AM, SoCalDep said:

The "rules" are a far second place to safety.  So is a stage plan, clearing the mind, relaxing, mentally and physically getting prepared to shoot, and anything else firearms related.  PERIOD.

 

I'm not saying we treat everyone like an idiot.  What I'm saying is that as the people responsible for safety on a range, it is our absolute responsibility to make sure that range is as safe as possible while still allowing a fun match (nothing is completely safe).  That means we need to be constantly thinking about what we can do better. 

 

One of those things we can do better is to understand the dynamics of human behavior and physiological training.  If you don't expect everyone to show up a B or better shooter, then you better be prepared to deal with the realities that come with the lesser experienced.  We need to keep in mind that it is "natural" to put the trigger finger on the trigger.  I know it's a horrible inconvenience, but if our range commands started with "make ready and then safely holster with your finger on the frame", there might be a whole lot less DQs.  Much, much more importantly, we'd be encouraging safe firearm manipulation.  If an expert didn't or doesn't like it... then I'm more concerned about them than the new shooter. 

Actually, the C class or below shooters are the ones that are more careful of holstering and doing it slower.  the B class and above shooters are the ones more complacent and not paying attention to holstering.

When playing in our sport, you are expected to be safe.  I would not recommend a new shooter to play in our sport.  having finger outside the trigger guard should be second nature, not naturally on the trigger as you say.

So I disagree that anything more than "make ready" is necessary.  When I RO, I do watch the gun go into the holster and if I see finger in the trigger and/or the safety is off, I will remind the shooter if there is time...so far so good...I just saved somebody from a DQ this past weekend because he forgot to put his safety on prior to putting it in the holster...

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Posted (edited)

As an RO I try to limit the jaw jacking, however if I feel the need to say something (other than the official commands) I do it before the MR command.  Quite a few shooters have a process they need to go through prior to the buzzer, so I have the courtesy to allow everyone that same opportunity.

 

As for the competitor mentioned in the initial post, I'm hoping he/she is OK, has learned a valuable lesson and comes back to shoot more USPSA matches; ideally better informed, trained and prepared.

Edited by muncie21

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Posted (edited)
On 7/5/2018 at 7:47 AM, racerba said:

Actually, the C class or below shooters are the ones that are more careful of holstering and doing it slower.  the B class and above shooters are the ones more complacent and not paying attention to holstering.

 

Last year I was at a match. I had already shot the stage and was sitting at the back of the shade structure. An A class shooter was MR about 20 feet in front of me. Suddenly there was a bunch of commotion and people scattering in front of me. As I'm getting up I see the muzzle of a big fat .45 pointed directly at me laying on the ground. Yep, he missed his holster and dropped the weapon on the ground. A class shooter headed for DQ.

 

Also, I learned a lesson, don't plant your ass in a chair anywhere directly to the rear )or maybe 45 degrees) of the start box.

Edited by Eureka1911

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This isn’t a surprising situation. It’s crazy how many people actually do this. It’s why my indoor range won’t let people draw until they’ve passed an hour long class and sign a waiver.

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Follow up to this thread.  There was no law suit, and the shooter actually asked if he could come back to that club and shoot.  That a boy for taking responsibility for you own actions!

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