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My Father Died In April

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Thank you all so much. ;)

As I hope most feel, my dad was truly a special man. He gave and gave and gave his whole life, and never asked for anything in return. I always considered it a personal victory if I could ever, after summoning all my persuasive powers, get to accept anything from me. Man was he stubborn. As times goes by, I realize I'm more like him than I'd have ever thought. (In the stubborn category for sure.)

One of my most striking memories (funny for me, cause of what he said) is from when I'd absolutely pissed him off like I'd never seen till then. (I was 17 and it was the first time I ever heard him use the "f" word.) I won't recount the exact scenario, but I'd been brought home by the police. (It was nothing serious, just got caught running around the streets when I was supposed to be sleeping over at a friends house.) Maybe I'd been on a roll lately... For whatever reason my dad was furious. After he told me that I was on restriction until I was 18, he said "In all my life I never met any SOB that is more stubborn than me!" (I took that as an incredibly huge compliment.) "And if any of your friends ask why you're grounded till you're 18, you tell them it's because you're f'ning old man said so." Wow. I towed the line till I was 18. (About 3 months.) Actually, I think he felt a little bad later, as he slacked on the "till you're 18" time frame. That could also be the first time I ever remember him softening up after he'd laid down the rules. Maybe he realized I wasn't all that different from him after all. :D

be

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Brian,

You can be proud to be called your dad's son. I am sure he was proud to be your dad.

Alan

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You can be proud to be called your dad's son.  I am sure he was proud to be your dad.

What a beautiful quote.

Brian, I extend my sincere condolences to you and your family.

Ironically I just read today about Lance Armstrong's amazing achievement (7th Tour de France win) and about his major battle with cancer, and his commitment to reach out to the cancer community (survivors, researchers, and others). I also learned of the book he wrote in 1999 entitled It's Not About The Bike, and I immediately thought of you BE !

And along those same lines, I was very inspired when I noticed he was quoted as saying 'There's this ancient Chinese belief that when a person is held in the hearts and minds and souls of so many other people, they can do better.'

Reminded me a little bit of another Zen master we all know very well ;) ...... but seriously, it has such a great ring of truth to it. Knowing that when others believe in the strengths & power of one individual, that one individual can rise above adversity!

Lance felt that the faith, hope, and encouragement of his fans, helped lead him on to victory. And the same thing can happen to you, me, everybody ... everyday ... in shooting, and in life!

LIVE STRONG Brian, and think of your Dad often!

You are always connected with him ..... for you ARE your fathers son!

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Sincere condolences to you and your family. I lost my mom about 2 years ago, and a younger brother a few years back. It hurts, you still remember the good times though.

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BE,

I think that what you wrote is the greatest show of love a dad could ever imagine. What a wonderful person your dad was. May God bless you and your family.

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Brian,

Funny how we are similar to our parents ;)

Not just stubborn part but give and give part, I think you are quite same as your old man. You give a lot to the community. Without this forum and you, I would'be still making bad ammos and spewing bulwets all over. ;)

I have never had a pleasure to meet your father but he so lives in you. We all thank your father for you!

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Brian,

Sorry to hear the news. I know how hard it is to accept the passing of a Dad. I lost mine this past May, and still think of him often. I can think of no better feeling than to know your dad was proud of you..

Mike

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Brian, I’m sorry to here of your loss. My father passed away this past February and I know the pain of your loss, but as all Great Fathers they live on in us. When you said he was your “Greatest Fan” those were the exact words I used in my fathers eulogy. You truly have my heart felt condolences.

Steve

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BE,

Deepest sympathies.

Parkinson's Disease is in the process of claiming my dad. My brother and I help mom take care of him, so he can die here at the place he lived and raised his family.

The most profound grace of life, is that great people can live on with us for the rest of our lives.

Hugh

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Sorry to hear that Brian.

He sounds like he was a great man.

May his memories last forever!

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Thank you everyone. As far as memories of my dad go - they're all good. I feel nothing but happy and lucky. One day, as I was on a plane returning to AZ (from a match, somewhere), it suddenly hit me like a ton of bricks - My dad adopted me when I was 6 months old. (Funny, when I typed that, for some reason it didn't "feel" right. I thought about it for a second, and realized it should be "6 months new.") If he wouldn't have adopted me, I couldn't even begin to imagine how my life may have turned out. Who knows what would have happened to me. I was filled with an enormous feeling of gratitude. At that particular moment in life I couldn't have been happier. And then to realize that I had my dad to thank for ALL of it was just too much. I think in that way, because I was adopted, I was able to appreciate my dad in an unusually great way. I wrote him a letter and told him everything I felt. The next time I talked to him on the phone, my dad, not being given to discussing such things, actually said - "Thank you for the letter - that was a keeper." Later my mom told me that he cried when he read it. I love my dad so much, and I know he loves me so much. Thank you all for your heartfelt comments.

be

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Sorry for your loss Brian...My thoughts and prayers will be with you and your family..

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My thoughts go out to you and your family, Brian.

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Brian,

To me it’s always comforting to hear men tell how much they love their father. It may be because I love mine so much and because I would like that one day my sons say the same about me. This kind of love that grows from respect and admiration defeats death. Your Dad loved you and left his love to you. He was made proud by you, cherished your love and took it with him.

Celebrate his life with the memories and continue to be an exceptional father and son duo.

“Un abrazo fraternal”

Nelson “Nemo” Colón

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Brian,

Men like that, the whole WWII generation made our sport available to us, and I'm grateful. Your discipline (sp) makes our sport enjoyable; so for the things you gleened from your mom and dad, and the things you share so freely-I am especially grateful. I use some of your "sayings" to my advantage in every day life, possibly soon with my father.

Thanks

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When I lost my brother I was told that, in time, I would get over it. I never did and am glad of it. The ache will always be, but its a good ache when coupled with positive memories.

Take care.

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Brian,

Men like that, the whole WWII generation made our sport available to us, and I'm grateful. Your discipline (sp) makes our sport enjoyable; so for the things you gleened from your mom and dad, and the things you share so freely-I am especially grateful. I use some of your "sayings" to my advantage in every day life, possibly soon with my father.

Thanks

Thank you - especially in your first post.

;)

When I lost my brother I was told that, in time, I would get over it. I never did and am glad of it. The ache will always be, but its a good ache when coupled with positive memories.

Take care.

I feel the same way. Even though the hardest thing is to realize every day that I'll never talk to him again, I doubt if a day will go by when I don't think in some good way about my dad.

My best friend ever, Rondy Neill, died from Lou Gerig's disease in Sept, 1997. I miss him and think about him every day, and hope I always do.

Thank you,

Brian

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Brian,

I am sorry to hear about the loss of your Dad. I lost mine nearly 6 years ago, and it was the lowest point in my life. When someone compares me in any way to my Dad, they have no idea of the compliment I consider that to be, and I have no doubt that you will be the same way. Stubborn? I think that may describe an entire generation. Times were hard, and tough. But they never quit, and accomplished a great deal. There is no good time or way to lose a parent, but I am glad that you had those 14 years.

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My brother, Clay, recently sent me his poem he wrote about "The Old Man."

Our Old Man could not be better memorialized. It put me in tears, twice now.

The Old Man

I remember when the Old Man came into my life,

Though he wasn’t quite so aged in those days.

He had taken my mother to be his new wife.

He was different and certainly had his ways.

The Old Man had a stature that was quite small.

But I'd learn it didn’t matter one little bit.

For when you did something which did him appall,

Just one look and “whatever” - you quickly quit.

The Old Man was quite stubborn and often very tough.

He lived by his own set of rules.

I learned to never try and call any of his bluffs,

He was hard – I bent over many stools.

The Old Man wasn’t perfect and often he would err,

But with fairness he always tried to live.

Junior Bowling he ran – of Little League he took care,

Of himself he would often gladly give.

The Old Man, in later years, had much to forbear

As cancer raged war for fourteen years.

Never once he did complain or say life was unfair.

With that gruffness he defeated all his fears.

The Old Man passed away just a few years ago,

Luckier than most who suffer for this long.

In his own home he died with his wife there also,

His journey done – no longer did here he belong.

The Old Man is in my thoughts and his absence makes me sigh,

For his sourness I still often get a yen.

Even though in later years we didn’t see eye to eye.

He was my father, and I loved him – The Old Man

Clay T. Enos June 9, 2008.

Dedicated to the memory of my step father

Harold (Bud) G. Enos Jr.

(1925-2005)

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I am so sorry Brian, I somehow missed this thread. Your mom and dad will forever stick in my memories of the Masters 3 Gun as some of the nicest people I met there. Rod and I are hoping you will grieve less as the days go by, and just be so grateful you had such a good man to look up to. We are here should you need anything~

Rod and Cheryl

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