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Pulling the trigger faster


RustedFrog

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I have a lot to work on and I know that. I am a C open shooter. Finally at nationals last year shot calling clicked. And I have finally realized the importance of staging a stage instead of just spending 30 seconds to find all the targets and be done. However when I watch video of myself compared to even other C class shooters my time between shots is extremely slow. Even on close shots when I am only seeing the sites once and pulling the trigger twice I will shoot two A’s most of the time and It feels fast. But when I look it isn’t. Not even close. What can I do to improve the speed of my trigger? I feel as though I’m pulling the trigger all out. 

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Do you dry fire?  do you have a timer?  practice dry firing with a shot timer.  You need to learn what you need to see faster.  Both Ben Stoeger and Steve Anderson have some really good dry firing books.  Set a par time or your drills and you will get faster.

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I don’t shoot open, but I noticed the same thing about myself last year.  My other problem was I dry fire too fast.  What I came to realize was my brain knew the difference between dry and live fire.  I made a conscious effort to practice live fire with targets of varying difficulty with a timer.  At first, I started from the low ready position and then added draws, movement, etc.  Fortunately, it didn’t take long to change this habit.

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If you are shooting with a dot you shouldn’t be seeing dot once and pulling trigger twice, same goes for iron sights. Most people getting started don’t know what to practice or what skills are need to shoot accurately fast. I see a lot of shooters rip off two shots and then they are scanning target looking for two hits on paper and repeat process. If you want to get better take a training class, one preferably that will get you introduced into what things you should be practicing and go from there.

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25 minutes ago, HoMiE said:

If you are shooting with a dot you shouldn’t be seeing dot once and pulling trigger twice, same goes for iron sights. Most people getting started don’t know what to practice or what skills are need to shoot accurately fast. I see a lot of shooters rip off two shots and then they are scanning target looking for two hits on paper and repeat process. If you want to get better take a training class, one preferably that will get you introduced into what things you should be practicing and go from there.

great advice

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I had money saved up to take a class with Max but after emailing him several times with no answer on a price or class availability or anything I had something come up and now I am back to saving again. Once I get the money again if I can’t get him to respond I’ll give up on him and see if I can get into one of Ben’s classes. 

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I did something that many people do not recommend but then I did hear Steve Anderson discuss it before and also says that you won't know how it feels until you do it.

I got a metronome app and set it at 180 while at the range.  (I had dryfired like this in the garage too using 3 targets.)

After getting the timing set in my mind again, I fired 10 rounds and 8/10 were in the "A" zone at 10 yards.

Just saying - this really gave me the confidence to push myself harder in the matches and it has paid off.

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2 hours ago, StratRider said:

I did something that many people do not recommend but then I did hear Steve Anderson discuss it before and also says that you won't know how it feels until you do it.

I got a metronome app and set it at 180 while at the range.  (I had dryfired like this in the garage too using 3 targets.)

After getting the timing set in my mind again, I fired 10 rounds and 8/10 were in the "A" zone at 10 yards.

Just saying - this really gave me the confidence to push myself harder in the matches and it has paid off.

Yes you have to push it to see how fast you can pull trigger but there comes a point where you have to put your focus somewhere and know where the shot is going. Spray and pray can only Take you so far. When the op says they are giving it all the can and it’s still not fast that leads me to believe they do not have a proper grip and are gripping to hard with strong hand and not able to manipulate trigger finger effectively. That’s where it is beneficial getting instruction is to see where shooter is at and work from there. 

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  • 3 months later...

Explore this in practice. Generally if something feels fast in a match it is because you are thinking about it. The goal is for these things to be subconscious, then you can feel slow and look fast instead.

I am also frustrated with my trigger speed. The best results I have had at improvement have been strengthening my grip to better manage recoil. I think that helped because it keeps the gun from moving around in my hands.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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  • 1 month later...
On 3/12/2018 at 12:32 PM, HoMiE said:

If you are shooting with a dot you shouldn’t be seeing dot once and pulling trigger twice, same goes for iron sights. Most people getting started don’t know what to practice or what skills are need to shoot accurately fast. I see a lot of shooters rip off two shots and then they are scanning target looking for two hits on paper and repeat process. If you want to get better take a training class, one preferably that will get you introduced into what things you should be practicing and go from there.

Agreed! 

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you can only shoot as fast as your front sight or in your case your dot. as soon as it falls onto the target again pull the trigger. better recoil control (tighter grip) will get you on target faster therefore allowing you to shoot faster. trying to time your second shot without watching your sights is only good for under 10 yds 

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worked on this for a while and then did a little math with a friend. So you shoot .20 splits and the other guy shoots .14 splits. Difference of .06 seconds. Now if you focus on your transitions and your time between targets is .25 and the other guy is .45, you have gained .20 per target. Let’s say 15 targets in a stage, that’s a 3 second advantage compared to a .90 second advantage per stage. Over a 8 stage match, that’s 24 seconds over the other guy.  Work on seeing your sights and using your core and legs to transition between targets faster.

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OP,

Why is it slow?  Is it an inability to manipulate the trigger, the gun is not on the target soon enough, or do you seem to have a set cadence when shooting in live fire/matches?

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  • 5 weeks later...

If you are seeing your sights, then get a steel target and a full mag and start shooting it, increasing your speed until you start to miss.  Figure out what you are or arent seeing. Find your limit and working on pushing that.  The audible feedback will instantly let you know what you need to know.  I think this is more helpful than pairs, since you can get into a timing routine with pairs that will fall apart when you end up on a stage with 3 shots per target.   The steel helped me, and I'd like to revisit this drill next time I'm at the range.

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Since this post I have done A LOT of practice. Hours and hours of dry fire along with a decent bit of live fire. I discovered several things. One I have never been truly pushing myself in the past in any of my practice. I was shooting as fast as I could shoot and still be exceptable (match mode) always. So in my dry fire I started pushing myself as hard as I could and then translated that over to about half of my live fire. It really made a difference. Another huge thing that I found was that I would get into a cadence. When I went back and watched my videos I would shot long or medium distance half targets and then move to close targets and my cadence would be the same. I did not adjust my speed any. I do still have a problem simply manipulating the trigger very fast. I just cannot seem to do it as fast as I think I should be able to. No matter what. But I have improved my speed a good bit since my original post. Maybe I just need a few more months of truly pushing myself in order to get faster.

 

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