Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!
obsessiveshooter

Other games that help your USPSA game

Recommended Posts

In the past month I have shot 2 bowling pin matches, as a way to get my 12 year old son to experience shooting in a competition environment.

As a sort of high-A Limited division shooter, I thought would clean up. Turns out it was harder than I thought. I wasn't used to aiming that hard and found that my default setting is to break the shot before my front sight is dead center of the rear notch. Knowing this gives me something to work on.

I can also see how playing tennis would be great for USPSA because you need to stay low and move like a bat out of hell to a new precise spot to do careful work with your hands.

What do you all find contributing to your USPSA performance?

 

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Steel Challenge. It's all about transitions. Originally invented by Mike Dalton and Mike Fishcman in 1981 as a practice venue for USPSA.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/6/2018 at 2:44 PM, Hi-Power Jack said:

Any other shooting sport - trigger time    :) 

 

IDPA hurt USPSA for me. Different equipment, & it weakens the sort of automatic course correction instincts that you develop, much better off skipping the IDPA match & practicing instead. 

 

Else, bicycle riding, sort of clears my head & helps with endurance. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, IHAVEGAS said:

 

IDPA hurt USPSA for me. Different equipment, & it weakens the sort of automatic course correction instincts that you develop, much better off skipping the IDPA match & practicing instead. 

 

Else, bicycle riding, sort of clears my head & helps with endurance. 

I also feel IDPA should be avoided if you want to get better at USPSA. Other shooting sport? Shoot more USPSA. Or practice for USPSA more. A well structured practice session could be more beneficial than a monthly match for skill improvement. 

 

Other games? I'd say anything that helps with aspects important to USPSA.  Movement, reaction times, hand eye coordination. 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Aceyduce said:

Badminton. You’d be surprised how fast and precise you need to be in that game.

I took badminton in college as a PE credit... I am NOT good at racket sports and the Asian guy that I always got stuck playing against seemed to have learned some sort of weaponized badminton when he was growing up.  I can still feel the bird hitting me, over and over and over again.  Yeah that was fun!  :(:unsure::ph34r:  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/8/2018 at 8:13 AM, B_RAD said:

 Shoot more USPSA. Or practice for USPSA more

 

 

 

 

Capt Obvious strikes again! Duh... Yes,  pure genius. Also take competition shooting lessons from a GM. 

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTOu-3no4Uzy2R-bMg7psT

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, 9x45 said:

 

Capt Obvious strikes again! Duh... Yes,  pure genius. Also take competition shooting lessons from a GM. 

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTOu-3no4Uzy2R-bMg7psT

 

 

Cool story bro. 

 

How many people ask how can I get better at X?  What they're asking is how can they get better at X without practicing X.  Sometimes Capt. Obvious has to make an appearance. Read the OP's last sentence. 

 

But good job taking one sentence of what I said out and trying to look cool.

 

 

 

Edited by B_RAD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm curious as to the sentiment that shooting IDPA would/could hinter USPSA development.  I'm interested in hearing more of the rationale.  Having spent a goodly amount of time regularly shooting both sports, my sentiment is that it could be plenty valuable, in particular for a newer/younger shooter.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, taadski said:

I'm curious as to the sentiment that shooting IDPA would/could hinter USPSA development.  I'm interested in hearing more of the rationale.  Having spent a goodly amount of time regularly shooting both sports, my sentiment is that it could be plenty valuable, in particular for a newer/younger shooter.    

This is just my opinion but I feel USPSA is more difficult. There are Masters in IDPA that are C class in USPSA.  To me it seems there's a lot more talent at USPSA matches. Plus, I think the stages are more difficult. More movement, more targets, ususally more difficult  targets too. Many different ways to shoot a stage. When I started shooting USPSA I felt like I was so far behind the curve on stage planning because most IDPA stages don't give many (if any) options on how a stage can be shot. It was programmed in for me to shoot outside in. The slice the pie target engagement requirement doesn't let people work to thier strengths.  I shot a lot of USPSA stages like I would IDPA and that's not always the best way for USPSA. Hardley ever is. IDPA is fun and is challenging but I just don't feel it makes you better at USPSA.

 

 

Edited by B_RAD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, taadski said:

I'm curious as to the sentiment that shooting IDPA would/could hinter USPSA development.  I'm interested in hearing more of the rationale.  Having spent a goodly amount of time regularly shooting both sports, my sentiment is that it could be plenty valuable, in particular for a newer/younger shooter.    

Having shot both.  I'll give my opinion.

IDPA stages tell you when and how to shoot their stages. (Tactical priority, Slice the pie, etc)  USPSA gives you the puzzle and says solve it.  You can watch 5 shooters shoot a USPSA stage and all five will shoot it differently.  EVERYONE shoots IDPA stages the same because you are told how to do it.  USPSA stages are harder and usually have higher round counts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, B_RAD said:

Cool story bro. 

 

How many people ask how can I get better at X?  What they're asking is how can they get better at X without practicing X.  

 

 

 

 

 

Yes, that is exactly what they are asking. Nobody wants to put in the time and effort, they just want some new magic to fix things. There is no new magic, there is only the fundamentals: stance, grip, sight picture and trigger control, along with movement and transition. True, some shooters look more cool than others while doing it. My plan is always the same as Vogels, except slower so I fell like I get more out of a stage. Don't want it to go by to fast.......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, B_RAD said:

This is just my opinion but I feel USPSA is more difficult. There are Masters in IDPA that are C class in USPSA.  To me it seems there's a lot more talent at USPSA matches. Plus, I think the stages are more difficult. More movement, more targets, ususally more difficult  targets too. Many different ways to shoot a stage. When I started shooting USPSA I felt like I was so far behind the curve on stage planning because most IDPA stages don't give many (if any) options on how a stage can be shot. It was programmed in for me to shoot outside in. The slice the pie target engagement requirement doesn't let people work to thier strengths.  I shot a lot of USPSA stages like I would IDPA and that's not always the best way for USPSA. Hardley ever is. IDPA is fun and is challenging but I just don't feel it makes you better at USPSA.

 

 

 

18 hours ago, stick said:

Having shot both.  I'll give my opinion.

IDPA stages tell you when and how to shoot their stages. (Tactical priority, Slice the pie, etc)  USPSA gives you the puzzle and says solve it.  You can watch 5 shooters shoot a USPSA stage and all five will shoot it differently.  EVERYONE shoots IDPA stages the same because you are told how to do it.  USPSA stages are harder and usually have higher round counts.

 

 

 

Those are all very fair points, fellas.  Thanks for taking the time. I agree with them for the most part.  The two games are quite different in some respects, no question. 

 

I agree in particular that USPSA is the more difficult of the two; longer courses of fire, more movement and athleticism, longer and potentially more difficult shooting requirements, etc...  And that’s not even factoring in the stage planning. 

 

But I think even some of the stage planning in IDPA (read “paint by numbers”) still requires many of the elements of memorization, visualization and then execution that USPSA does (on an admittedly smaller scale) and that it’s actually a nice stepping stone for folks learning the action shooting thing. I haven’t personally ever found it a hindrance stepping back up to bigger more complex USPSA stages.  In fact the opposite, which is why I asked. 

 

One could also argue that having a course of fire with less potential options would be a better test of the pure shooting, in contrast to ones stage breakdown/planning skills.  :P

 

At any rate, the folks capable of shooting As/zeros the fastest and the most efficiently are the ones winning both sports. I think the mechanics cross over pretty significantly. 

 

Just my take.   Thanks for entertaining the question. 

 

t

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not really a game but yoga is excellent for training shooting sports.

 

Got into it doing p90x workouts and it’s no joke. Strength, flexibility, breathing control and ability to “center” and relax your mind. 

 

Sounds something out of Beyond Fundamentals!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not a game, but I’ve seemed to see a correlation with people who work with their hands and good shooters.

People have hit the nail on the head with things I would say (anything stressing hand/eye coordination or athleticism), but also, try KIMs games or other mental acuity games.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...