Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Improving reloads...


tanks
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have cleaned up some things in my reloads to gain .40 seconds in live fire (yes, it was bad). Basically brought the gun down just enough to see the magwell while the fiber is still on the target (so I can get back to it the moment I turn the gun)  and speed up the hand to get to the mag and shoot sooner rather than dwell on the target. What more can I do? The par timer  at the video is set at 1.5 secs. I want to get it down another .30 seconds if I can. I realize if I want to move from "C" to "B" i need faster reloads.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, TrackCage said:

I would also suggest having a mag in the gun. Without it, it can be easy to cheat the mag button and not really press it enough to drop the mag.

 

+1 , also you can delay the mag drop if you rotate the gun too much or too quickly, best to catch this in practice.

 

There is a great thread on fast reloads that I could not find with a quick search. One of the GM's on the other thread talked about slapping your weak arm like a wet rag (or whatever mental image gets you to really hammer movement to and from the mag pouch), my very amateur look at the vid made me think that the weak arm is moving sort of casually. I did not see a two step process - get the mag there fast - insert the mag. 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would at least use a mag in the magwell some of the time, to keep you honest. I drop mine over the laundry hamper.

 

I would advise breaking it into parts and work on those parts separately. Start with burkett reloads, where you insert 'just the tip' of the mag into the magwell and stop. you should be able to get those down to .6 or so, but it will require you to aggressively move your weak hand. Make sure you are getting your weak hand index finger lined up along the spine of the mag.

 

then do 'pause and effect' reloads ala steve anderson. set the partime for .1 or so, and do the burkett reload (just the tip), then wait for the beep to finish the reload, aggressively seating the mag and driving the gun back out on target as you acquire the sights. While waiting for the beep, verify that you index finger is in the right place, you are looking at the magwell, and the gun is in as high a position as you can make it work.

 

These 2 drills have helped me alot over the last year or so.  But take heart, I made A with a reload that wasn't any better than where you are now, so if you can execute at that speed *all the time*, you'll do just fine so don't forget to work on shot-calling.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I think the breaking it down to micro drills is a good idea. I think using a mag in the gun (with a couple dummy rounds in it) and some dummy rounds in your load mag are a good idea too.

 

bear in mind like most internet experts I suck fairly hard but I can (when warm) execute 1 second reloads with my open or production gear on drills like el prez and 4 aces in live fire.

 

If I had to pick apart some things in your vid:

 

no 'urgency' of your movement.

 

really REACT to that beep, weak hand off the gun, going to mag, slap down on that mag fast etc. you do look very smooth and relaxed though which are both good things. 

 

the 2 big things that got my reloads from being stuck at 1.5 down to 1-1.2 in live fire was:

 

1: moving weak hand much more aggressively to the mag

2: really pushing back out and rebuilding grip as SOON as mag is seated to get back to firing quickly without any dwell at the end of the reload.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Stoeger has a 3 target drill ; draw - press trigger 6 times while on A zone of first target - reload - second target - reload - last target. 

 

I use this as my main reload drill. I figure if you can practice 3 or 4 things at the same time, do it. Seems to make the reloads more like real reloading. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, BeerBaron said:

I think the breaking it down to micro drills is a good idea. I think using a mag in the gun (with a couple dummy rounds in it) and some dummy rounds in your load mag are a good idea too...

 

If I had to pick apart some things in your vid:

 

no 'urgency' of your movement.

 

really REACT to that beep, weak hand off the gun, going to mag, slap down on that mag fast etc. you do look very smooth and relaxed though which are both good things. 

 

Thanks. I actually have full 20 dummy rounds in my practice mag. I had bought a sample size of 180 grain Blue bullets and loaded them up with no powder and spent primer to differentiate from my regular bullets (red, green or gold).

 

Since I posted the video and saw the comments I have started to "explode" towards my mag both in regular and  Burkett reloads. I am beginning to see the difference in faster speeds. Now, just have to burn it in and make it consistent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

From the video I would absolutely agree with others that you need a mag in that gun to drop.  I say that based on what you're doing with the gun.   Never hurts to dedicate a mag or mags to this practice.  Although I understand the importance of practicing standing reloads it's not something we normally do in a match.  Working in some transitions or movement in your dryfire in addition to this wouldn't hurt.  Now as far as moving from C to B and reloads, I'm betting there other things hanging out there lower for plucking so I wouldn't get too hung up on reloads.  Not saying you are hung up on them but stay focused on all your fundamentals.  Keep up the good work.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, in a match of course there are lower hanging fruits (transitions, movement etc.) that I have been working on as well. However, for classifiers where you draw, fire 6 shots reload and fire 6 shots (seems to be most of them). Draw and reload is about half your time or more. I wasn't paying much attention to either before and had a slow draw and reload. Both have gotten better due to a more consistent and focused dry fire regimen since last November.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, tanks said:

Well, in a match of course there are lower hanging fruits (transitions, movement etc.) that I have been working on as well. However, for classifiers where you draw, fire 6 shots reload and fire 6 shots (seems to be most of them). Draw and reload is about half your time or more.r.

 

Better to get to be a good B class shooter & then classify there than the other way around, in my opinion. I tend to be able to classify better than I can run a field course, seems normal for the slow but accurate crowd. 

On the other hand, when you hit a reload right it is cool, I assume you are shooting for fun & slick reloads do add to the fun. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, IHAVEGAS said:

 

Better to get to be a good B class shooter & then classify there than the other way around, in my opinion. I tend to be able to classify better than I can run a field course, seems normal for the slow but accurate crowd. ...

 

Since Nationals where I placed at 53.4% (309A,32B,58C,15D,2M,1NPM) I have been working on my movement and transitions and shooting sooner by being ready to shoot as I come up to position, as the guys that placed around 60% were about 100+ seconds faster than me. So, I think my match performance has been going up due to that. The draw and reloads were weaknesses for classifiers as I had felt they were not that important in a match situation for a Limited shooter. You draw and move so faster draw doesn't matter as much and almost the same for the reload ( I had thought). But, I am realizing now that landing that reload within the first step and then hauling a** does save a smidgen of stage time and it all adds up overall.

 

Still have room for tons of improvement in all facets of the game and my new regimen (since Nationals) of two thirty minute dry fire sessions a day and one to two live fires a week coupled with weekly matches should help. Not to mention having a 4 hour training session 2-3 times a month with a local GM. It is amazing how iterative this game is and how much little changes can impact the overall performance over time.

Edited by tanks
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...
On 1/25/2018 at 8:33 PM, Rez805 said:

One thing I noticed (and it might just be the camera angle) is that you don't really break your grip immediately. It appears that both hands are on the gun as you bring it back.

Agreed! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Well, in a match of course there are lower hanging fruits (transitions, movement etc.) that I have been working on as well. However, for classifiers where you draw, fire 6 shots reload and fire 6 shots (seems to be most of them). Draw and reload is about half your time or more. I wasn't paying much attention to either before and had a slow draw and reload. Both have gotten better due to a more consistent and focused dry fire regimen since last November.

You’re right that reloads can help a lot on classifiers, but I think most people discount transitions on the stand and shoot stages. If you’re not familiar look up Stoeger’s distance change up drill. This drill has helped me a lot on transitions from open to partials on classifiers and in regular stages. As far as reloads go, when looking at B class it’s more important to have a great grip after the reload than to smash out sub second reloads. However, I found breaking the reload into two separate motions helped me a lot, especially getting the gun pushed back out on target quickly.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Something that helped me speed up my reload was getting the gun back on target quickly. It sounds dumb, but I would get the mag in the gun fast but I would push the gun out too slow. Breaking the reload down into two parts helped a lot.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For what it is worth. I think I have spent too much focus on getting the mag in the gun and too little focus on getting my butt hurried over to the next shooting position. 

 

Watching GM production gun folks seems to support this idea, not that they can't do crazy fast standing reloads at need. 

 

Disclaimer is that I do not care much about classifiers. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/26/2018 at 5:05 AM, IHAVEGAS said:

Disclaimer is that I do not care much about classifiers. 

 

They count towards my score, and I care about my score. Any speed-shoots with standing reloads also count towards my score, and pretty much every major match has a couple.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think its in Steve Anderson's book where he states that any movement that is considered extra movement is not necessarily. I look at that when i do my reloads, and I try to keep my gun holding hand as far out and as close to what it is when I'm standing and shooting as possible. So, I hold my right hand nearly straight out and keep it on target or as close as I have. To be fair, its fairly tough to reload like that.
When I'm moving and reloading, i pull the gun into my "work area" and reload smoothly while moving to the next box/target.


Full disclosure, I just started shooting USPSA 4 months ago, and all of my knowledge comes from Steve Andersons book and Ben Stoegers book. Soooo, I'm not a good source of knowledge on what works.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

A trick is to put the timer next to the mag pouch. The hand slap/grab should register.  That gives a measurable result on the first part of the reload. 

 

I can get a .40 - .43 pretty regular and sub .40 occasionally.  but, under .45-.50 and the grab gets too sloppy to have a clean reload. So im still burning in the correct grab at speed.

 

Good luck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...