Jump to content
Brian Enos's Forums... Maku mozo!

Found a simple method to measure spring rate


igolfat8

Recommended Posts

I was sorting through some recoil springs and thought some “felt” a different rate than others in the same rate. I needed a way to measure spring rate but couldn’t find an simple method in the search function. So .... I took my pistol cleaning rod (minus the jag) and slid a flat washer on it and then a recoil spring. I placed the spring vertically on my digital postal scale. Then I pressed down on the flat washer to compress the recoil spring on the pistol cleaning rod. I read the weight on the postal scale and darn if it wasn’t pretty close to the rated spring weight. I measured all of the springs I had and most were very close, within a few ounces. A couple were a pound to pound and a half off. At least this gives me a method to compare and measure my recoil springs now. Perhaps this method has been used before by others but if not give it a try.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/12/2018 at 7:17 AM, Climbhard said:

What is the compressed length of a spring for a 5” 1911?

The length 5” 1911 springs are rated at is 1.625”. Commanders are rated at 1.125”, and Officers at 0.70”. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

Nice tip!   I'm interested in using this method to measure when I need to replace the recoil spring.  So, can anyone provide data on how much a worn spring is reduced compared to a newer one?  Others from this forum suggested replacing when old spring is 3 coils shorter than the new one.  Just curious.  One way to answer my own question would be with a set of various spring weights and seeing which weight was too low.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/9/2018 at 6:35 PM, igolfat8 said:

I was sorting through some recoil springs and thought some “felt” a different rate than others in the same rate. I needed a way to measure spring rate but couldn’t find an simple method in the search function. So .... I took my pistol cleaning rod (minus the jag) and slid a flat washer on it and then a recoil spring. I placed the spring vertically on my digital postal scale. Then I pressed down on the flat washer to compress the recoil spring on the pistol cleaning rod. I read the weight on the postal scale and darn if it wasn’t pretty close to the rated spring weight. I measured all of the springs I had and most were very close, within a few ounces. A couple were a pound to pound and a half off. At least this gives me a method to compare and measure my recoil springs now. Perhaps this method has been used before by others but if not give it a try.

That is brilliant, I am going to check my known ones with a few that I have laying around.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Just an fyi, for anyone with a Dillon press, the large pistol primer tube is the exact od to fit perfectly into a 1911/2011 recoil spring. Makes for real easy measuring and most of us have one laying around probably not in use. Slap on a washer, grab a food scale or postal scale, go to town. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, tcazes said:

Just an fyi, for anyone with a Dillon press, the large pistol primer tube is the exact od to fit perfectly into a 1911/2011 recoil spring. Makes for real easy measuring and most of us have one laying around probably not in use. Slap on a washer, grab a food scale or postal scale, go to town. 

Why do we have to go to town? Can't we measure it at home?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 3/31/2018 at 2:57 PM, Zmaniac said:

Nice tip!   I'm interested in using this method to measure when I need to replace the recoil spring.  

 

Before it breaks.

I never replace recoil springs. Only issue I have ever seen is a broken spring in a compact 9mm. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i have found that as my splits start getting worse and worse ill replace the spring and it tightens things back up (open gun). usually happens every 4k or so rounds. realistically i could get probably 8 or 10k out of it but they are super cheap so i swap them out regularly. more of a precautionary swap than anything. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I use a 5/8" deep wall socket without any gun disassembly. Place the socket square drive side down on your scale. Place your pistol muzzle over the top of the socket and press down just shy of bottoming out your slide travel. Your barrel will simply extend into the deep wall socket unhindered. Observe your scale reading. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...